Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

On End of Linux Mint KDE Edition

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
  • Linux Mint to No Longer Offer a KDE Edition After Release of Linux Mint 18.3

    Linux Mint founder Clement Lefebvre announced that the upcoming Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" operating system is the last release to ship with a KDE edition.

    So, believe it or not, Linux Mint is dropping the KDE Edition after the release of Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" next month. Clement Lefebvre said that he and his team want to concentrate more on making Linux Mint a better GNU/Linux operating system, and they no longer want to focus on the Linux Mint KDE Edition.

    "With Linux Mint 18.3, we’ll release one more KDE edition. I wanted this announcement to come before the release," said Clement Lefebvre. "It will hurt its popularity of course, but I wanted to give users time, either to react right now or to take their time, upgrade and adapt to this later on. I’m sure this edition will be missed, and I hope its users understand our decision."

  • Linux Mint 18.3 will be the last to include KDE spin

    Clem Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has authored a new blog post detailing plans about the project’s future. He said the Linux Mint 19 will only be available in Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce flavours and that the KDE spin will be discontinued. Mint 18.3 will still be available with KDE out of the box.

  • Linux Mint Is Killing Its KDE Edition, Debian-based LMDE 3 “Cindy” Is Coming

    Last month, we told you that Linux Mint 18.3 will be codenamed Sylvia and gave you a preview of what features you should expect from the upcoming release. While there isn’t any specific release date fixed for Mint 18.3, we can expect to land somewhere in December 2017 with Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS base.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 will come with Flatpak and Redshift

    With November fast approaching, the Linux Mint team is getting ready to push out version 18.3, the final release before Linux Mint 19. For a point release, it’s got some pretty nice changes included with it like support for Flatpak, and a better Private Internet Access client in the Software Manager to improve the experience for customers of that VPN service.

Latest Linux laptops: from open SBC spin-offs to Coffee Lake conquerors

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux laptop scene is perking up with ARM-based open hardware projects on the low end to high-end models rocking the latest Intel 8th Gen CPUs.

Recently, Linux desktop usage has grown from 2.14 percent to 3.23 percent according to NetMarketShare. Much of this increase appears to have come from Linux-based Chromebooks, which are likely undercounted due in part to their widespread use in schools.

Read more

CAINE 9.0 "Quantum" is out!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

CAINE (Computer Aided INvestigative Environment) is an Italian GNU/Linux live distribution created as a Digital Forensics project
Currently the project manager is Nanni Bassetti (Bari - Italy).
CAINE offers a complete forensic environment that is organized to integrate existing software tools as software modules and to provide a friendly graphical interface.

Read more

GNU: FSFE Newsletter, Glibc, GCC

Filed under
GNU
  • FSFE Newsletter - October 2017

     

    The EU is currently revising its copyright rules in its proposal for the EU Copyright Directive in the Digital Single Market, so that they may be more suitable for the modern digital age. Instead of recognising the realities of how different content is being shared online, the current EU Copyright Directive proposal, and in particular its Article 13 targeted at online hosting providers, threatens our ability to access public code repositories and share code online. The new rules enshrined in Article 13 intend to introduce new obligations for code hosting platforms in order to prevent any possible copyright infringement: if they do not implement these, the platforms will end up being directly liable for their users' activity. [...]

  • Glibc 2.27 Will Premiere With Many Optimizations

    When glibc 2.26 was released in August it was a noteworthy release with plenty of optimizations and introduced its own per-thread cache. With the next installment of the GNU C Library there will also be many more optimizations.

    A few days back I wrote about more functions receiving FMA optimizations including powerf/logf/exp2f/log2f. That article also mentioned how replacing some old Assembly versions of functions with generic C code has also resulted in significant performance improvements. That's not all.

  • Intel Pushes More GCC Patches For New Instructions On Icelake Processors

    Intel has published more patches for supporting new instruction set extensions that will debut with "Ice Lake" processors when launched in late 2018 or early 2019.

    Besides Intel recently landing CET support in GCC as the Control-flow Enforcement Technology, their compiler engineers have been working on supporting the other instruction set extensions coming with Icelake processors, which is the successor to the next-gen Cannonlake CPUs.

Should You Use Linux Mint's Debian or Standard Edition?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

At first, users might wonder why Linux Mint offers both its Ubuntu-based Linux Mint Standard Edition and the Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). Since Debian, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu all derive from the Debian repositories, isn't the family resemblance too close to bother?

To the casual user, the choice may appear to be no more than the result of Linux Mint trying to accommodate as many users as possible. However, depending on your needs and preferences, you may find that one edition suits your needs more than the other.

In general, the two editions have much in common. Both the Debian and the standard editions are available in 32- and 64-bit downloads that default to the Cinnamon or Mate desktops. Both use the same installer, and both open for the first time on desktops with similar wallpapers and tools. Both, too, can add other desktop environments from the Mint repositories that they both share. According to Linux Mint, LMDE is faster than the standard edition, but in practice the difference is slight enough that many users probably never notice.

However, look closer, and the differences start to appear -- although these difference have changed over the years. For example, it is no longer true that the LMDE is a rolling release -- one that adds new packages as they become available, rather than waiting for a general release -- although LMDE 1 was.

Also, contrary to a widely circulating story, LMDE 2 is fully capable of using Ubuntu PPA repositories for packages in development. The PPAs simply have to be added as a package source in /etc/apt/. Alternatively, their packages can be downloaded and installed using the dpkg command. Since Debian and Ubuntu have been different distros for well over a decade now, you may find that some packages from PPAs are not compatible with Debian, but these cases are relatively rare, particularly if you stick to productivity applications rather than core system components.

Read more

antiX-17 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A very quick announcement for now, just to let you all know that antiX-17 “Heather Heyer” is now available.

Get the various iso files from here for now.

Read more

ArchLabs 2017.10 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

So in my previous release blog post I made mention that 2017.09 was probably our last major release for the year…….I told porkies…..

2017.10 was going to be just an ISO refresh as Arch has just released one themselves but as it happens, when you are chipping away at settings and configs, they take on a life of their own. We decided that we had added too many cool things and tweaked enough that to call 2017.10 a mere “refresh” wasn’t really a fair description or representation.

But, before I carry on about the new release I would like to welcome to the ArchLabs team as a collaborator, Josiah Ward. He brings with him a ton of Linux knowledge. Josiah is a part of the Revenge distro and was kind enough to help us out with a few things.

Read more

Devices: Purism Librem 5, 'IoT', and ConnMan

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Purism Librem 5 Crowdfunding Ends With Over $2 million Raised

    That’s it: time is up on the Purism Librem 5 crowdfunding campaign.

    The bold project to build a privacy-orientated smartphone powered by free software ends with over $2.1 million raised against its $1.5 million goal (which it reached in early October).

  • Comment: Disrupting the insurance business with open source IoT hardware

    The adoption of IoT products is a bit sluggish. While there are many causes, the number one reason stems from the high cost of hardware, with the retail price of IoT devices typically much more than disconnected alternatives. But pricey hardware only partly explains the underlying reasons for the mammoth difference — a broken revenue model is the real elephant in the room.

  • Managing Internet connections on Linux devices with ConnMan

    Connection Manager (ConnMan) is a connection management daemon (connmand) for managing Internet connections within devices running the Linux operating system. It offers low memory consumption with a fast, coherent, synchronized reaction to changing network conditions.

  • Orange, DT unite to show how open source can aid IoT

    Orange and Deutsche Telekom are working together on a project that aims to demonstrate how smart home devices can be integrated through open source software and open standards.

Richard Stallman - One Of My Favorites (GNU/Linux)

Filed under
GNU

Renowned programmer and promoter of free software *, Richard Stallman developed many flagship software, notably those underlying the GNU project and the general public license known by the acronym GPL, which he wrote with the lawyer Eben Moglen and the collaboration of Roland McGrath.

This program was at the origin of the flowering of the Wiki, initiated by Ward Cunningham in 1995, modifiable websites constructed by the community of the Internet users, such as Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Stallman was also the author of the term copyleft in ironical reference to the notion of copyright that he was fighting.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Darling ('Wine' for OS X) and Games Leftovers

Linux 4.13.14, 4.9.63, 4.4.99, and 3.18.82