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8 Not-so-Crazy Linux Predictions for 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

With a new year upon us we felt it was time to share some of our Linux predictions for 2018.

Whether they are likely to happen, or just hopeful thinking, is up for debate.

But 2017 showed us that nothing is truly predictable. During the previous 12 months we saw:

Linux market share increase to suspiciously high levels
Ubuntu drop Unity and return to the GNOME fold
Big name games launched on Linux
Wayland ship by default on more distributions
Several new Linux kernel releases

And a lot more!

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LinuxConsole 2018 Gaming Operating System Released with TORCS and SuperTuxKart

Filed under
GNU
Linux

LinuxConsole developer Yann Le Doaré just informed us on Twitter that he released today LinuxConsole 2018, an independently developed operating system for children and kids.

Designed as a modern, gaming, and educational GNU/Linux distribution that can be easily installed on 32-bit or 64-bit computers and comes pre-installed with ready-to-use software and games, LinuxConsole 2018 brings up-to-date components like Linux kernel 4.9.66 LTS (64-bit) and Linux kernel 4.1.48 LTS (32-bit).

MATE 1.18 is used as default desktop environment in LinuxConsole 2018, which makes it possible to manage Bluetooth devices and simplifies the configuration of wireless networks. It also comes with the latest Mozilla Firefox 57 Quantum web browser and supports Arabic locale.

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And the best distro of 2017 is ... (Kubuntu)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This probably does not come to you as any surprise. But Zesty Plasma is akin to Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr when it comes to reliability, flexibility and fun. Not only have I done my usual share of testing, I had it committed on multiple machines, I use it regularly as a near-production system - 'twould be a production one if it were fully supported for five years, alas - and even after long, continuous use, it maintains its elegance and charm.

Kubuntu 17.04 really revived the Plasma world. A stunning, high-quality release with many advanced, smart and semi-pro to pro features. Great stability, good fonts, seamless networking, improved smartphone support, excellent performance. I can keep on using the superlatives, but that's too fanboyish. At the end of the day, no matter what I threw at it, Zesty persevered. And the biggest testament to its success is the fact that I am using it daily and that I have seriously contemplated (still do) having my next prod machine running Kubuntu, a conviction that got a little disturbed by the rather lackluster Aardvark release. But all that said, nothing can spoil Kubuntu Zoomy Zoltan's glory. It really and truly is the perfect little desktop system.

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Orange Pi One Plus Single Board Computer With Android Is Here, Linux Images Are Coming

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Whenever we discuss single board computer and Raspberry Pi-alternatives, Orange Pi definitely earns a mention. This cheap, tiny computer looks just like Raspberry Pi and packs some useful features. Its makers have recently released the latest iteration in the form of Orange Pi One Plus, which is available on AliExpress for $19.99 + shipping.

The most important feature of this device is the brand-new SoC — Allwinner H6 V200 quad-core Cortex A53 processor with Arm Mali-T720MP2 GPU. This processor is designed for Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0, PCI interfaces, etc. However, with Pi One Plus, you only get one USB 2.0 host port and microUSB for power. You can also power it via 4V/2A DC power barrel jack.

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Kernel Exploit For Sony PS4 Firmware 4.05 Released, Full Jailbreak Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

A ‘jailbreak’ allows users to modify (a smartphone or other electronic device) to remove restrictions imposed by the manufacturer or operator, for instance, allow the installation of unauthorized software, third-party applications, and games that are basically not possible because of the anti-piracy mechanisms implicated on the device. In this case, it is the Sony PlayStation 4, which comes with its own firmware and an operating system designed by the company, but with the option to install GNU / Linux distros.

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14 Linux and open source conferences worth attending in 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Whether your budget permits you to attend large, global events or just small local shows, there's a Linux and open source conference to suit everyone.

As I write this at the end of 2017, my thoughts turn to holiday celebrations, friends and family, and setting up my 2018 Linux and open source trade show calendar. OK, so maybe everyone doesn't put that last item on their project planning list, but when you cover Linux and open source as deeply as I do, detailed scheduling is necessary.

Even if you don’t live and breathe open source, I highly recommend you attend at least one conference that fits your schedule and travel budget. The technical know-how you gain can make your life easier, and it’s helpful to know what’s on the horizon. Sometimes, a single how-to presentation can save you a week of work or a panel discussion can help you formulate your company’s IT strategy—and that justifies the cost.

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On GUADEC:

  • Sam Thursfield: 2017 in review

    The single biggest event was certainly bringing GUADEC 2017 to Manchester. I had various goals for this such as ensuring we got a GUADEC 2017, showing my colleages at Codethink that GNOME is a great community, and being in the top 10 page authors on wiki.gnome.org for the year. The run up to the event from about January to July took up many evenings and it was sometimes hard to trade it off with my work at Codethink; it was great working with Allan, Alberto, Lene and Javier though and once the conference actually arrived there was a mass positive force from all involved that made sure it went well. The strangest moment was definitely walking into Kro Bar slightly before the preregistration event was due to start to find half the GNOME community already crammed into the tiny bar area waiting for something to happen. Obviously my experience of organizing music events (where you can expect people to arrive about 2 hours after you want them somewhere) didn’t help here.

Top 10 Most Popular Linux Distributions of 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As the year 2017 comes to an end, it’s time to find out which Linux distributions are most popular. However, the news of the Linux world at the Desktop level was not very surprising, while in the segment of Internet of Things, Blockchain and Cloud, Linux has been one of the systems in the spotlight.

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Linux Lite 3.8 Beta Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Lite 3.8 Beta is now available for testing. There have been a number of changes since the 3.6 release.
This is the last release for Series 3.x

Linux Lite 3.8 Final will be released on February 1st, 2018.

The changes for Linux Lite 3.8 include - more support for LibreOffice, regional support for DVDs, a Font Viewer/Installer and we now have our own Google based Search page as the home page in Firefox. We've also added TLP for Laptops to Lite Tweaks.

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How to Configure Linux for Children

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you’ve been around computers for a while, you might associate Linux with a certain stereotype of computer user. How do you know someone uses Linux? Don’t worry, they’ll tell you.

But Linux is an exceptionally customizable operating system. This allows users an unprecedented degree of control. In fact, parents can set up a specialized distro of Linux for children, ensuring children don’t stumble across dangerous content accidentally. While the process is more prolonged than using Windows, it’s also more powerful and durable. Linux is also free, which can make it well-suited for classroom or computer lab deployment.

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Top 10 Microsoft Visio Alternatives for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft Visio is a great tool for creating or generating mission-critical diagrams and vector representations. While it may be a good tool for making floor plans or other kinds of diagrams – it is neither free nor open source.

Moreover, Microsoft Visio is not a standalone product. It comes bundled with Microsoft Office. We have already seen open source alternatives to MS Office in the past. Today we’ll see what tools you can use in place of Visio on Linux.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released