Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Programming: GNU/Linux Development and Custom Android ROMs

Filed under
Android
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Create a Linux desktop application with Ruby

    Recently, while experimenting with GTK and its Ruby bindings, I decided to write a tutorial introducing this functionality. In this post, we will create a simple ToDo application (something like what we created with Ruby on Rails) using the gtk3 gem (a.k.a. the GTK+ Ruby bindings).

  • C# developer, Linux two of the fastest-growing search terms for Canadian tech job seekers

    A new report from Indeed Canada shows the fastest-growing search terms for tech job seekers in Canada.

  • The pain of installing custom ROMs on Android phones

    A while back I bought a Nexus 5x. During a three-day ordeal I finally got Omnirom installed - with full disk encryption, root access and some stitched together fake Google Play code that allowed me to run Signal without actually letting Google into my computer.

    A short while later, Open Whisper Systems released a version of Signal that uses Web Sockets when Google Play services is not installed (and allows for installation via a web page without the need for the Google Play store). Dang. Should have waited.

    Now, post Meltdown/Spectre, I worked up the courage to go through this process again. In the comments of my Omnirom post, I received a few suggestions about not really needing root. Hm - why didn't I think of that? Who needs root anyway? Combining root with full disk encryption was the real pain point in my previous install, so perhaps I can make things much easier. Also, not needing any of the fake Google software would be a definite plus.

    This time around I decided to go with LineageOS since it seems to be the most mainstream of the custom ROMs. I found perfectly reasonable sounding instructions.

Linux Mint Monthly News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Monthly News – April 2018

    Before anything else, let’s thank all the people who contribute to this project. Many people do, in very different ways. Special thanks to our donors to our “silent friend” from Germany for the coffee!

    Many thanks also to all the developers who interacted with us on Github lately. We’ve seen a lot of new faces and very cool contributions. A slack team was recently set up to improve communication between new developers and the development team.

  • Linux Mint Continues Work On Mint 19, LMDE 3

    The Linux Mint project has published their monthly recap of activities going on for April with this popular desktop Linux distribution.

    To little surprise, much of their time has been spent on setting up their re-base against Ubuntu Bionic (Ubuntu 18.04) for Linux Mint 19 and Debian Stretch for the upcoming LMDE3 (Linux Mint Debian Edition). As part of these upcoming OS releases, they have also been buttoning up the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment update.

Tired of Windows and macOS? Try out elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It’s interesting to change your default OS to try out something new sometimes, but then if you already have Windows 10 on your machine, I don’t see a strong argument to install elementary OS. Some might prefer it, but I think I will go back to Windows for now and check back with other solutions in the future. Please consider this as my own humble opinion. I recommend you to try out new solutions and find your own favorites. So, can elementary OS replace the big players? It could, but I suppose it’s mainly depending on the tools you (want to) use in your workflows.

If you mostly leverage software that’s exclusively available on Windows or macOS, it doesn’t really work out to swap between the systems, but if you can manage to shift it all towards Linux, you might survive the transition without too much pain points. If you’re mostly working within Google Chrome, you can also just install Chrome for Linux on elementary OS and run your work like that. In this particular case, you’ll feel almost no change, but then, you might as well opt for Remix OS or another type of Chrome OS.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Now Available To Download With 5Yrs Of Support

Belated Coverage of GIMP 2.10.0

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • GIMP 2.10.0 Has Arrived & You Can Download It For Free

    Back in March, we said that the GIMP team were '12 blocker bugs away from making the final release' of the latest version of their free-to-use photo editing software and it seems the bugs have been fixed as version 2.10.0 is now available for download.

    The new release comes after 6 years of work and there's a long list of notable changes including an updated UI, new blend modes, layer groups can finally have masks on them and new tools such as the Warp transform, the Unified transform and the Handle transform tools have been introduced.

  • GIMP 2.10 open source image editor released, finally supports HiDPI displays

    GIMP is a free and open source graphics editing program for Linux, Mac, and Windows computers. Its been around for more than two decades, and it’s a powerful tool that’s often compared to Adobe Photoshop… although Photoshop users tend to complain that GIMP’s menus and tools are unintuitive. But it’s hard to complain about the price: GIMP is free for anyone to use.

  • GIMP 2.10 Image Editing Software Now Supports HiDPI Displays

    The development team behind the open source image editing software GIMP have this week released the highly anticipated GIMP 2.10.0 which brings with it a wide variety of new enhancements, tweaks and features including support for HiDPI displays.

    GIMP is an acronym for GNU Image Manipulation Program and is a freely distributed program providing an application to retouch photographs, adjust image composition and image authoring. Features of the latest version of GIMP 2.10.0 include :

    – Image processing nearly fully ported to GEGL, allowing high bit depth processing, multi-threaded and hardware accelerated pixel

    [...]

  • Miner One Is Launching Its Bitcoin-Mining High-Altitude Ballon Today, New Stable Version of GIMP and More

UBOS Beta 14: support for data disks and more

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Just in time for the Let’s Self-host Installathon at Linuxfest NorthWest in Bellingham, WA, UBOS beta 14 is out!

Read more

GIMP 2.10.0 Coverage

Filed under
GNU
GNOME
  • GIMP 2.10.0 Has Been Released with HIDPI Display support and New Dark Theme

    GIMP is a free and open source software for creating and editing image content. The development team has just announced the new stable release GIMP 2.10.0. It’s been almost six years of heavy development since the earlier stable release GIMP 2.8.x back in 2012. So, let’s check what’s new in GIMP 2.10.0.

  • After 6 Years, GIMP 2.10 is Here With Ravishing New Looks and Tons of New Features

    Free and open source image editing application GIMP has a new major release today. GIMP 2.10 comes six years after the last major release 2.8.

    It won’t be an exaggeration if I say that GIMP is the most popular image editor in Linux world and perhaps the best Adobe Photoshop alternative. The project was first started in 1996 and in the last 22 years, it has become the default image editor on almost all major Linux distributions. It is also available on Windows and macOS.

Should Have Installed GNU/Linux....

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Microsoft sends recycler to jail for reinstalling obsolete, licensed copies of Windows on refurbished PCs

     

    After doing everything in its power to put this amazing, brilliant, principled man in jail, Microsoft issued a statement smearing him and calling him a "counterfeiter."
     

    As JWZ puts it: "In case you've forgotten: Microsoft is still a vile garbage fire of a company."

  • Penguins in a sandbox: Google nudges Linux apps toward Chrome OS

    This indicates it's a feature aimed squarely at developers and system administrators – a world away from the education market where locked-down Chromebooks rule.

    "Signs point to other devices, even ones with ARM system-on-chips, receiving support in the future," wrote Miyamoto. "But perhaps not quite yet for 32-bit machines. There are also hints that some parts of VM functionality required to run Crostini won't be available for devices with older kernel versions."

    More may be revealed at Google's annual developer conference, I/O, starting 8 May.

  • Crostini Linux Container Apps Getting Full Native Treatment on Chromebooks

    Another day, another Crostini feature comes to light. So far, we have the Linux Terminal installer, Files app integration, and Material Design cues already rounding out the Linux app experience. As we continue to uncover clues by the day, it seems development of the Crostini Project is full steam ahead today is no different. Each clue we uncover continues to push the entire experience closer to something I believe will be delivered to developers and general users alike.

GIMP 2.10 Officially Released as the Biggest Release Ever, Here's What's New

Filed under
GNU

The latest release, GIMP 2.10, is the biggest yet, bringing so many changes that it would be impossible for us to list them all here. Instead, we'll have a look at the most prominent ones, which include multi-threaded, high bit depth, and hardware accelerated pixel processing.

This is possible thanks to the GEGL porting of the image processing engine inside GIMP, which can now do a lot more than that. Also ported to GEGL (Generic Graphics Library) is the on-canvas preview for all filters that ship by default with GIMP 2.10.

Read more

Also: GIMP 2.10 Released With A Ton Of Improvements

Crostini for GNU/Linux Ubiquity

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Linux Apps On Chromebooks

    Don't you sometimes wish that you could throw the entire development stack out and start again. Yes we all do, but we all also know that if we did no-one would follow us. The reasons we use the technology we do has very little to do with good engineering and nothing at all to do with good design. We sort of struggle on from where we are to get a little further down the road. It isn't even that we know what our end point is, it is more that we inch along to a slightly better place. Viewed from 1000 feet our progress must look a lot like a random walk.

  • Chrome OS will support Linux apps — with a dash of Material Design

    A commit to Chromium’s code has revealed more about Google’s plan to support Linux apps in Chrome OS with a dash of Material Design.

    Google’s annual I/O developer conference is just around the corner, and we’re starting to see the usual early hints at what to expect. We’ve known about Project Crostini, the codename for the project to bring Linux apps to Chrome, for some time — but the UI elements have remained a mystery, until now.

    The developers behind Crostini appear to have settled on the Material Design-inspired ‘Adapta’ theme for Linux. Google may choose to create its own bespoke theme which is even closer to Chrome OS, but for now, it seems this is what’s being used.

  • “Terminal” App Brings Crostini And Linux Apps One Step Closer To Chrome OS

    Developers continue to bring together bits and pieces of the still mysterious Project Crostini and this week we see more detail of what the end-user could see whenever the new feature is made available. Yesterday, Robby shared a sneak-peek as some new UI elements that will bring a Material Design feel to the container tech as well as evidence that Crostini will have access to the Files App on Chromebooks.

  • Crostini Seemingly Gaining Direct File Access In Chrome OS

    Google Chromebook owners who frequently have to work with Linux applications can attest that one of the biggest limitations of the Crostini Linux container is that it does not have direct access to the device’s file system, but it seems that this may be changing soon. The way things work now forces files generated in the Crostini container to stay there, and keeps users from using local files inside the container’s application. A workaround is available via SSH, but it can be cumbersome. A recent code commit in the Chromium repository points to Google using Crostini’s built-in SSH and a pre-built action library to create an easier solution, essentially giving Crostini file access privileges to and from the Chromebook.

Google Just Forked a Popular GTK Theme

Filed under
GNU
Google
GNOME

Rumour is that desktop Linux apps are coming to Chromebooks, and when they do they may look rather familiar.

Like, Adapta GTK theme familiar.

Reports earlier in the year revealed plans Google has to add Linux virtual machine support in Chrome OS via LXD containers.

We speculated at the time that the move could allow end-users to run desktop Linux apps on Chromebooks without resorting to existing Crouton-based hybrid-OS solutions.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more