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LLVM/Clang

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The 6 unwritten rules of open source development

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Development
OSS

The sports world is rife with unwritten rules. These are the behaviors and rituals that are observed but rarely documented in an official capacity. For example, in baseball, unwritten rules range from not stealing bases when well ahead to never giving up an intentional walk when there’s a runner on first. To outsiders, these are esoteric, perhaps even nonsensical guidelines, but they are followed by every player who wants to be a valued teammate and respected opponent.

Software development, particularly open source software development, also has an invisible rulebook. As in other team sports, these rules can have a significant impact on how an open source community treats a developer, especially newcomers.

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C Compiler News

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Development
GNU
  • Fedora 26 Likely To Receive GCC 7, Other Changes Still Being Devised

    Fedora 26 will likely be using GCC 7 as its default compiler.

    This shouldn't come as a big surprise since Fedora usually always ships with the latest stable GNU Compiler Collection release. GCC 7.1, the first stable GCC 7 version, should be out in late March or early April while it's just about in the final state of development and could allow GCC 7 being added to F26/Rawhide very soon.

  • A Look At The New Features Coming To GNU C Library 2.25

    Three weeks from today should mark a new release of the GNU C Library, glibc 2.25, and it's coming with many feature additions.

Development News:

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Development
  • How to choose your first programming language

    The reasons for learning to program are as a varied as the people who want to learn. You might have a program you want to make, or maybe you just want to jump in. So, before choosing your first programming language, ask yourself: Where do you want that program to run? What do you want that program to do?

  • Go 1.8 Baking Garbage Collector Improvements, Lower Cgo Overhead

    The first release candidate of Google's Go 1.8 programming language is now available ahead of the official launch expected next month.

    Go 1.8 now has 32-bit MIPS LE/BE Linux support, this will be the last release with Linux ARMv5E/ARMv6 support (Go 1.9 will likely still support though the ARMv6K for the RPi1), the Assembler supports more instructions, the new 64-bit x86 back-end is now much more mature, and there are a variety of library changes.

  • The difference between development and deployment

    One possibility is that tools like version control systems were not designed to be used in production environments. For example, giving someone permission to push to the testing branch but not the production branch is not possible. The most common objection to this scheme is that if a vulnerability were discovered, you would want to mark certain commits as inaccessible. This would be another case of finer grained permissions; developers would have read access to all commits, but external users would not. We might need some additional engineering for existing tools to support this paradigm, but the features are easily understood and have been engineered into other software artifacts. For example, Linux (or PostgreSQL) implements the idea of fine grained permissions for different users.

LLVM News

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Development
BSD

  • LLVM Founder, Swift Creator Chris Lattner Is Leaving Apple

    Chris Lattner who is known most recently for starting the Swift programming language while most profoundly he is the original creator of LLVM/Clang, is leaving his job at Apple.

    Lattner had been the director of the Developer Tools department, including Xcode and similar compiler efforts around Swift/LLVM. Chris joined Apple in 2005 due to his work on LLVM/Clang. His wife is the president of the LLVM Foundation. Coming as a surprise today is that he's leaving Apple and no longer the Swift Project Lead, per this mailing list post.

  • LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

    The latest LLVM and Clang compiler code as of this morning now has support for Zen (AMD Ryzen) processors.

    Back in 2015 there was the AMD Zen "znver1" patches for GCC along with Zen for Binutils while with the latest Git/SVN development code for LLVM/Clang today is similar "znver1" support.

Development News:

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Development
  • Top 50 Developer Tools of 2016

    It took a bit of time to comb through the data, but there are some killer insights in here. To piece this list together, we aggregated usage from 40K+ tech stacks, over a million unique visits, and thousands of developer comments, reviews, and votes across all of 2016 (more on methodology below). Through it, we found some of the top tech trends coming into 2017 and what should be on your bucket list. Let’s get started!

  • Keynote: State of the Union: node.js by Rod Vagg, NodeSource

    During his keynote at Node.js Interactive in November, Rod Vagg, Technical Steering Committee Director at the Node.js Foundation talked about the progress that the project made during 2016.

  • Node.js: The State of the Union

    By all metrics, it has been a good year for Node.js. During his keynote at Node.js Interactive in November, Rod Vagg, Technical Steering Committee Director at the Node.js Foundation talked about the progress that the project made during 2016.

Development News

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Development
  • Hot Functions for IronFunctions
  • Google Develops Experimental Python Runtime In Golang

    Google's open-source team today announced Grumpy, a Python runtime written in the Go programming language.

    Google makes use of Python extensively and with concurrent workloads not being a strong suit for CPython and other Python runtimes having their own shortcomings, Google decided to develop the "Grumpy" runtime.

  • Grumpy: Go running Python!

    Google runs millions of lines of Python code. The front-end server that drives youtube.com and YouTube’s APIs is primarily written in Python, and it serves millions of requests per second! YouTube’s front-end runs on CPython 2.7, so we’ve put a ton of work into improving the runtime and adapting our application to work optimally within it. These efforts have borne a lot of fruit over the years, but we always run up against the same issue: it's very difficult to make concurrent workloads perform well on CPython.

Development News

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Development
  • KDevelop 5.1 Beta 1 released

    We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.1 Beta! Tons of new stuff entered KDevelop 5.1, a bigger blog post show-casing all the features in 5.1 will follow when we release the final version. Here's a brief summary of what's new in this version:

  • KDevelop 5.1 Beta 1 Released With LLDB Debugger Support
  • What does cross stitch have to do with programming? More than you think

    Arts and crafts. Creativity and diligence. Taking the mundane and adding that touch of genius and individuality. A needleworker spends hours creating artwork with simple threads of many colors, and programming is the same—words and numbers woven over hours to create something with a purpose.

    Recently, I’ve started learning JavaScript, and around the same time I also started teaching myself cross stitching. As I've learned both I've experienced the parallels between learning a traditional craft like cross stitching and a modern craft like programming. Learning traditional crafts can teach us new ways for learning coding efficiently as the techniques and skills acquired when learning traditional crafts are easily transferable to modern crafts like programming.

  • Dawn-CC: Automatically Adding OpenACC/OpenMP Directives To Programs

    The DawnCC project is out of the UFMG University and aims to provide automatic parallelization of code for mobile devices and other supported software/hardware of OpenACC and OpenMP.

    DawnCC attempts to automatically add OpenACC and OpenMP directives to C and C++ code-bases. The Dawn compiler makes use of LLVM IR to analyze memory chunks, dependencies within loops, etc, in order to be able to automatically produce code that makes use of OpenMP and OpenACC where relevant.

Germany's 1&1 Still Working On MARS For The Linux Kernel, Still Hoping For Upstream

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Development
Linux

At the end of last year was an update on MARS Replication System Still Being Worked On For Upstream Linux Kernel and like clock work, the German web hosting provider has issued another update on the in-development MARS replication system and is still hoping to mainline it, maybe next year.

MARS' tag-line at the 1&1 web hosting company is "replicating petabytes over long distances" and "has replaced DRBD as the backbone of the 1&1 geo-redundancy feature as publicly advertised for 1&1 Shared Hosting Linux (ShaHoLin). MARS is also running on several other 1&1 clusters. Some other people over the world have also seemingly started to use it."

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GNOME/GTK News

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Builder 3.24 Promises Big Features, 3.22.4 Improves Flatpak Support

    The developers behind the open-source and free GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) app released the fourth maintenance update to the 3.22 stable series.

    That's right, we're talking about GNOME Builder 3.22.4, which comes approximately three weeks after the third point release in the series and promises to improve various components and features of the application, but also to address many of those nasty issues reported by users since GNOME Builder 3.22.3.

  • GTK+ 4 Development Continues with Vulkan Implementation and More Deprecated APIs

    A new development build of the upcoming GTK+ 4 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit used to create those beautiful GTK apps everyone adores arrived last week with a lot of new features and bug fixes.

    GTK+ 3.89.2 comes just one month after the first development snapshot, versioned 3.89.1, and it looks like it comes with a new Vulkan implementation that was added in parallel to the OpenGL one, CSS border-spacing support for the GtkBox and GtkGrid widgets, as well as the gadgets, and a working gtk4-icon-browser.

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More in Tux Machines

Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space

Panasonic Jan. 12 unveiled a new tablet in its Toughpad series of devices designed for the corporate world. But unlike so many other rugged Panasonic machines, the FZ-A2 doesn’t run Windows. Instead, the device is running on Google’s Android Marshmallow, an operating system not typically associated with rugged PCs and mobile devices designed for rough-and-tumble field-service work. But the FZ-A2 is just the latest model in Panasonic's expanding line of Android tablets. This new Toughpad includes several corporate-friendly features such as robust security, a hot-swappable battery and plenty of ports that allow connection to a wide range of accessories. The Toughpad is launching at a time when market reports have consistently shown a steady decline in popularity of tablets. But Panasonic says its device is coming along at the right time. This slide show will take a look at the Toughpad to see whether its features will convince field-service workers and corporate hardware buyers that the tablet really is as appealing a buy as Panasonic claims it is. Read on to learn more about Panasonic’s FZ-A2 Toughpad. Read more

LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26

A new spin/flavor has been proposed for Fedora 26, one integrating the LXQt desktop environment. For those late to the party, LXQt is the formation of the LXDE and Razor-qt projects and built around the Qt5 tool-kit. Fedora currently has an LXDE spin while this proposed Fedora LXQt would continue to co-exist alongside the existing LXDE version. Christian Dersch who proposed the LXQt spin explained, "LXDE spin will exist until its maintainer will stop it, LXQt is independent from LXDE spin. So nobody is forced to change ;) Also both projects are maintained upstream so there is no reason to drop anything here." Read more Also: F26 Self Contained Change: LXQt Spin

Linux Graphics

Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux

In the previous two posts I wrote about SUSE Linux and Fedora/Manjaro ARM/Ubuntu MATE for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The results were mixed, at best. This time I'm taking on even more of a challenge because I'm going to be looking at the original Raspberry Pi Model B and B+, and the Raspberry Pi Zero. These models all have much more limited CPU power and memory than the Pi 2 and 3, so it will be interesting to see what can be done with them. Read more