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Development

In-Development Software

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Development
  • Chromium Now Enables GTK3 For 32-Bit Builds
  • Oracle Outs VirtualBox 5.1.22 and 5.0.40 Maintenance Releases to Fix ALSA Issues

    Oracle released two new maintenance updates of its open-source and cross-platform virtualization software, VirtualBox 5.1.22 and VirtualBox 5.0.40, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows.

    Both VirtualBox 5.1.22 and VirtualBox 5.0.40 are bugfix releases that come about ten days after the launch of the previous updates, in this case VirtualBox 5.1.20 and VirtualBox 5.0.38. They include pretty much the same changes with small exceptions.

  • GNOME 3.25.1 Released

    GNOME 3.25.1 is now available as the first development milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26.

  • ETSI announces the latest release of its Open Source MANO

    The ETSI Open Source MANO group (ETSI OSM) has announced OSM Release TWO. The standards body says this new release of its management and orchestration (MANO) work brings significant improvements in terms of interoperability, performance, stability, security and resources footprint to meet operators’ requirements for trials and upcoming RFx processes.

COBOL, Python and BeeWare

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Development
  • Banks should let ancient programming language COBOL die [iophk: "easy money"]

    Despite the fact that three trillion dollars run through COBOL systems every single day they are mostly maintained by retired programming veterans. There are almost no new COBOL programmers available so as retirees start passing away, then so does the maintenance for software written in the ancient programming language.

  • Cross-platform development with Python and BeeWare

    If you want to develop for Android, you have to use Java. If you want to develop for iOS, you have to use Objective C. And if you want to develop for the web, you have to use JavaScript. Right?

    These may be the preferred languages for these platforms, but at the end of the day, mobile phones and web browsers are computing platforms, and with a little work, you can use any language you want. With the BeeWare suite of libraries and bridges, you can use just Python. And, you can use the same code to deploy on all these platforms.

Qt 5.10 and digiKam

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Development
KDE
  • Qt 5.10 Platform Support Changes Being Discussed

    Qt developers have begun a fresh round of discussions over the supported platforms / operating systems of Qt 5.10 that will be released in the later part of this calendar years.

    Among the officially supported Linux distribution changes would be moving to RHEL 7.3, openSUSE Leap 42.2, Ubuntu 17.04 (still keeping around 16.04 LTS too), moving the Windows MinGW to MinGW 6.3, and more.

  • digiKam – A Professional Photo Editing and Management Software

    digiKam is an advanced cross-platform digital photo management app inspired by photographers’ needs to view, tweak, enhance, organize, and share photographs across Linux systems.

    It possesses all the tools and feature set necessary to process, manage, organize, and transfer photographs, videos, and RAW files – while consistently receiving optimization upgrades to its feature set and workflow.

Development News: Rust 1.17 and SourceForge

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Development
  • Announcing Rust 1.17

    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.17.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Rust 1.17 Released

    Judging by the massive Rust fan base in our forums, those of you reading this will be delighted today about the newest version of Rustlang, v1.17.

  • SourceForge: Let's hold hands in a post-CodePlex world [Ed: Microsoft Gavin needlessly interjects Microsoft into it. Like CodePlex was EVER relevant…]

    President Logan Abbott has said he’ll seek tighter integration between SourceForge’s tools and those of others – including giant rival GitHub.

GNOME Development

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.25.1 Released

    The first development snapshots of GNOME Shell and Mutter in the 3.25 series were released today in preparation for this week's GNOME 3.25.1 milestone.

    Mutter 3.25.1 contains a number of improvements, mostly around its low-level monitor and display code. Some of the 3.25.1 work includes syncing window geometry on state changes, using EGL rather than GLX on OpenGL ES drawing, fixed HiDPI detection for vertical monitor layouts, scaling relative motion deltas with the monitor scale, a rework of low-level monitor configuration, and other fixes.

  • GNOME development release for Shell & Mutter 3.25.1 is now out, stable 3.26 due in September

    The first development release of what will become GNOME 3.26 has released today for Shell and Mutter.

    For Mutter, the window manager for GNOME, this development release changes: fixed HiDPI detection on vertical monitors, fixes a lock-up when using additional theme variants and they also did a rework of low-level monitor configuration and more.

Enlightenment Development

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Development
GNU
Linux
  • Enlightenment image viewer Ephoto 1.0 released

    The fancy looking Ephoto 1.0 [Official Site, Git] for Enlightenment has been officially released recently with lots of useful features to manage your image library.

  • Enlightenment Working On OpenGL-Accelerated Evas Filters

    An Enlightenment developer has been working on support for accelerating EFL Evas filters with OpenGL shaders.

    Evas is Enlightenment's display canvas API. Those wishing to learn about Evas before reading this article can see this Enlightenment.org page.

Development News

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Development

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GCC 6 Becoming Auxiliary Compiler In OpenIndiana

    While GCC 7 is being released in the days ahead, the OpenIndiana crew continuing to advance the open-source Solaris stack has begun offering GCC 6 as an auxiliary/supplementary compiler.

  • LLVM Still Working Towards Apache 2.0 Relicensing

    LLVM developers have been wanting to move from their 3-clause BSD-like "LLVM license" to the Apache 2.0 license with exceptions. It's been a while since last hearing about the effort while now a third round of request for comments was issued.

  • How Operation Code helps veterans learn programming skills

    After leaving the military, Army Captain David Molina knew he wanted to go into software development. As Molina did research on the field, he found himself overwhelmed by the vast amount of information and choices. For example: What coding language is the right one to learn? What language is the most valuable for being competitive in the job market? To add to the confusion, there are a myriad of for-profit code schools that are proliferating at an exponential rate, and each one advertises career outcomes for a fraction of the cost of a four-year computer science degree. Where could he turn for guidance on how to enter the tech industry?

Node.js Foundation Interview and New Offer

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Development
Interviews

Development News

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Development
  • 5 ways to succeed at learning a programming language

    Whether you're taking up programming for the first time, or learning your 50th language, you might ask, "What's the best way to learn to program?" I surveyed dozens of people who taught themselves to program in Rust as part of my OSCON talk in 2016, and asked the expert autodidacts what advice they would give to others for picking up a new language. I found that despite their diverse backgrounds, all of my interviewees shared five common approaches to building new programming skills.

  • GitHub Developer Program shows bigger love

    The GitHub Developer Program (programme, if we’re using Her Majesty’s English) has been around for around three years now.

    Essentially, this initiative exists to encourage developers to test out application builds that integrate with GitHub.

  • GitHub Opens Developer Program to All

    GitHub Inc. has revamped its developer program with several changes, including opening it up to all developers for the first time.

    Previously, the three-year-old GitHub Developer Program was available to only those developers who had paid accounts at the open source code repository and software development platform specializing in Git-based version control.

  • RcppQuantuccia 0.0.1
  • 3 open source code libraries to handle MARC-formatted records
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More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated
    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both. After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets. I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.
  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.