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Development

Development News

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Development
  • Google GSoC, Outreachy Kick Off Their Summer 2016 Coding Projects

    Yesterday marked the official start of the projects for this year's Google Summer of Code and the summer round of the Outreachy (formerly the Outreach Program for Women) projects.

    The Google Open-Source Blog announced the start of GSoC 2016 with this being their 12th year and having around 1,200 students with 178 different open-source organizations participating.

  • Japan Just Made Computer Programming A Compulsory Subject In Its Schools

    With an aim to improve children’s creative and logical thinking, Japan has decided to make programming a compulsory subject in its schools. To start this program from 2020, the Japanese government has constituted panels to decide the programming syllabus and incorporated the matter in its growth strategy agenda.

  • GitLab Container Registry

    Yesterday we released GitLab 8.8, super powering GitLab's built-in continuous integration. With it, you can build a pipeline in GitLab, visualizing your builds, tests, deploys and any other stage of the life cycle of your software. Today (and already in GitLab 8.8), we're releasing the next step: GitLab Container Registry.

    GitLab Container Registry is a secure and private registry for Docker images. Built on open source software, GitLab Container Registry isn't just a standalone registry; it's completely integrated with GitLab.

  • Moving on From GitHub

    Last year I joined GitHub as Director Of Community. My role has been to champion and manage GitHub’s global, scalable community development initiatives. Friday was my last day as a hubber and I wanted to share a few words about why I have decided to move on.

    My passion has always been about building productive, engaging communities, particularly focused on open source and technology. I have devoted my career to understanding the nuances of this work and which workflow, technical, psychological, and leadership ingredients can deliver the most effective and rewarding results.

    As part of this body of work I wrote The Art of Community, founded the annual Community Leadership Summit, and I have led the development of community at Canonical, XPRIZE, OpenAdvantage, and for a range of organizations as a consultant and advisor.

  • My time with Rails is up

    Last year I made a decision that I won’t be using Rails anymore, nor I will support Rails in gems that I maintain. Furthermore, I will do my best to never have to work with Rails again at work.

    Since I’m involved with many Ruby projects and people have been asking me many times why I don’t like Rails, what kind of problems I have with it and so on, I decided to write this long post to summarize and explain everything.

    This is semi-technical, semi-personal and unfortunately semi-rant. I’m not writing this to bring attention, get visitors or whatever, I have no interest in that at all. I’m writing this because I want to end my discussions about Rails and have a place to refer people to whenever I hear the same kind of questions.

  • An overview of Lean, Agile and DevOps

    The lunch of big corporate IT is being stolen by smaller, nimbler companies. Big IT, with its greater resources, should have crushed the competition. Rather it is playing catch-up. But things are changing. There is a quiet revolution in corporate IT. Big organisations are learning from small companies and are beginning to use it at scale. Goliath is back but acting like David.

Development News

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Development
  • Discharge rate estimate in new battery statistics collector for Debian

    Yesterday I updated the battery-stats package in Debian with a few patches sent to me by skilled and enterprising users. There were some nice user and visible changes. First of all, both desktop menu entries now work. A design flaw in one of the script made the history graph fail to show up (its PNG was dumped in ~/.xsession-errors) if no controlling TTY was available. The script worked when called from the command line, but not when called from the desktop menu. I changed this to look for a DISPLAY variable or a TTY before deciding where to draw the graph, and now the graph window pop up as expected.

  • Repurposing Old Smartphones for Home Automation

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit, Mozilla Technical Evangelist Dietrich Ayala proposed a simple and affordable solution to home automation: A discarded smartphone can handle some of the most useful home automation tasks without requiring expensive hubs and sensors -- or risking data security in the cloud.

    “With a smartphone you can detect motion, sound, presence, and the absence of radio services,” said Ayala in his presentation, “Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web.”

  • Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web by Dietrich Ayala
  • GNU Make 4.2 Released!
  • DevOps and Culture: The Evolution of DevOps in the Tech Industry
  • Linux 4.7 Gets a Security Boost with ChromeOS Feature

    We're currently inside of the two week merge window where code is being pulled in to form the Linux 4.7 kernel. One of the GIT pull requests came from Linux kernel developer James Morris and includes at least one really interesting new security feature, by way of a new Linux Security Module (LSM).

Solus Operating System Now Provides Out-of-the-Box Support for 32-bit Apps

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OS
Development

The Solus developers are having the time of their lives these days as part of a new, online event called Solus Hackfest 1.2, where the operating system's developers are trying to implement new features to the upcoming Solus 1.2 release.

Read more

Development News

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Development
  • Python, Go, And Scala — Best Programming Languages You Should Learn To Boost Your Salary
  • crossroad 0.6 released: cross-building GIMP as an example

    Over the years, I have written a tool to cross-compile software under a GNU/Linux OS for other targets: crossroad. Well to this day, the only supported targets are Windows 32/64-bit. I realized I never advertised this tool much which — even though it has been originally built to help me build and hack a specific project (GIMP) — ended up as a generic cross-compilation system for Linux.

  • Django and PostgreSQL composite types

    PostgreSQL has this nifty feature called composite types that you can use to create your own types from the built-in PostgreSQL types. It’s a bit like hstore, only structured, which makes it great for structured data that you might reuse multiple times in a model, like addresses.

    Unfortunately to date, they were pretty much a pain to use in Django. There were some older implementations for versions of Django before 1.7, but they tended to do things like create surprise new objects in the namespace, not be migrateable, and require connection to the DB at any time (i.e. during your build).

  • GHC 8.0.1 is available!
  • GHC 8.0.1 Haskell Compiler Released

    Developers behind the Glasgow Haskell Compiler announced their first "super-major version" of the compiler in six years.

  • GNU Make 4.2 Released

Development News

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Development
  • Upcoming changes in PHP 7.1

    Below are the key changes that will be introduced (or removed) in PHP 7.1. For a full list, and to see which changes are being discussed, check out the official PHP RFC.

  • Changes Being Worked On For PHP 7.1

    PHP 7.1 is coming later this year as the first significant update to last year's PHP 7 release that delivered huge speed improvements.

    We've already been looking forward to new features with PHP 7.1 and in not looking at the 7.1 work in a few months, more improvements have materialized.

  • Perl 5.24 upgrade
  • Selected projects and mentoring organizations

    The following projects have been selected to participate to SOCIS 2016.

    Instruction for students: you can apply now, but you must first contact the mentor of the project of your choice and discuss the contents.

FOSS contributors

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Development
OSS
  • 1000 contributors!

    On the ownCloud blog, Jos shared today that the ownCloud community has hit an impressive milestone!

    The project I started 6 years ago just got a contribution from the 1000th volunteer who considered ownCloud worth the time and effort to contribute code to! Only a year ago, we were so proud having hit over 550 contributors at our 5 year anniversary. It is stunning how fast ownCloud has continued to grow.

  • 7 ways to make new contributors feel welcome

    Sumana Harihareswara and Maria Naggaga gave back-to-back talks at OSCON 2016 on how we can build our open source communities in such a way that contributors feel safe and loved.

    First, recognize that people participate in open source for many reasons. Some of us are lucky enough to get paid to work on it, others are doing it for a school project, and others are doing it just for fun or for the passion of the project. Start by looking at your project as an outsider and try to think about what they might find discouraging or not helpful. There are things in our projects that can be alienating. Evaluate these weird things in your projects and decide if you want to make changes or not.

Why Should Every Developer Contribute To Open Source Software?

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Development
OSS

Since the beginning of the free and open source software movement, a lot has changed. Today, open technologies are being used by millions of individuals and companies to make their products better. Open source software development also brings numerous benefits to a developer and here we are going to talk more about the same.

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$1 Open Source Hacking Board Is Here For Programming And Electronics

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Development
Hardware

To make the process of learning programming and DIYing easier and cheaper, One Dollar Board’s crowdfunding campaign has arrived on Indiegogo. The team behind the project aims to make the board available at a price of $1 + shipping all across the world, with a focus on developing countries.

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Git and GitHub

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Development
  • Git 2.8.3 Source Code Management System Introduces over 20 Improvements

    Git, the popular and acclaimed source code management system, has received its third point release, version 2.8.3, bringing over 20 improvements and bug fixes to the current stable 2.8 branch.

  • Your project's RCS history affects ease of contribution (or: don't squash PRs)

    Github recently introduced the option to squash commits on merge, and even before then several projects requested that contributors squash their commits after review but before merge. This is a terrible idea that makes it more difficult for people to contribute to projects.

    I'm spending today working on reworking some code to integrate with a new feature that was just integrated into Kubernetes. The PR in question was absolutely fine, but just before it was merged the entire commit history was squashed down to a single commit at the request of the reviewer. This single commit contains type declarations, the functionality itself, the integration of that functionality into the scheduler, the client code and a large pile of autogenerated code.

Development News

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Development
  • 4 Ways Custom Code Metrics Improve a Development Team

    One of the things that has surprised me over the years is how infrequently people take advantage of custom code metrics. I say this not from the perspective of a geek with esoteric interest in a subject, wishing other people would share my interest. Rather, I say this from the perspective of a business man, making money, and wondering why I seem to have little competition.

  • Why Continuous Integration Is Important

    Everything starts out fine, with management asking the developers for the amount of time it will take to implement a feature. The developers provide an answer, and management takes them at their word.

    Inevitably, one of two situations results: the deadline goes by yet the feature isn’t finished, or the feature is implemented on time, but it’s either faulty, creates new bugs, or both.

  • 3 open source Python GUI frameworks

    There comes a time in the journey of most any programmer when they are ready to branch out past the basic examples and start to build a graphical interface to their program.

    In Python, the steps to get started with GUI programming are not terribly complex, but they do require the user to begin making some choices. By its nature as a general purpose programming language with interpreters available across every common operating system, Python has to be fairly agnostic as to the choices it presents for creating graphical user interfaces.

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