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RapidDisk 3.2 Now Available.

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Linux
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RapidDisk and RapidCache are a collection of Linux RAM drive and block level RAM caching modules. It is designed to achieve high performance without the need of acquiring new hardware.

I would like to announce the release of version 3.2. The Changelog is as follows.

  • Replaced procfs management to sysfs.
  • Identified & corrected a couple of memory leaks.

GitHub Code

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Development Releases

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GitHub Reveals Most Popular Programming Languages

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Python Misc.

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  • Interview with Mikey Ariel, Django Girls EuroPython 2015

    Django Girls is a rapidly growing initiative that aims to bring more women into world of programming. It started a year ago at EuroPython 2014, and since then Django Girls workshops have been held all over the world. In just a year, more than 1,600 women learned about Python and Django during the workshops and many, many more did it at home by reading their open source Django tutorial.

  • Doing Astronomy with Python

    One of the things that makes Python so powerful is that you can find a module for almost anything. In this article, I cover Astropy, which was originally developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute for doing astronomy calculations like image processing and observatory calculations. Because this is a Python program, you can install it with either pip or easy_install. Your Linux distribution already should have a package included.

  • Shell-o world: Turtle graphics in Python

    One of my teacher colleagues recently shared his strategies for using Turtle graphics with Python. This piqued my interest (due to my earlier experiences). Since Python is included with most Linux distributions, I was eager to meet my old friend the Turtle.

    To begin, I needed to install Python's graphical interface, Tkinter. Once I accomplished that, I was ready to begin. I opened a terminal, typed "python," and pressed Enter.

    At the Python prompt, I typed "import turtle"—and was ready to begin. At the prompt, I typed, "turtle.forward(100)" and pressed Enter. The graphical interface appeared, and the turtle moved 100 turtle steps forward.

    You can use many commands to turn, change the pen color, pick up the pen, change the background color, and more. The Python documentation is very good.

GNOME Control Center Gets a Major Revamp with LTE and Pyongyang Time Support

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GNOME

The development team behind the GNOME Project is hard at work these days preparing to release the first Beta build of the upcoming GNOME Control Center app, an essential component of the anticipated GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.

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Also: GNOME Maps Gets Support for Copying Geo URIs in GNOME 3.18

GTK+ 3.18 to Receive Support for Touchpad Gesture Events for Wayland

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The developers of the famous GTK+ GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit are hard at work these days preparing for the final release of the GTK+ 3.18 software, which will be distributed as part of the GNOME 3.18 desktop environment.

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Geary 0.10.0 Email Client Lands in Elementary OS

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Geary is the default email client default in Elementary OS and it's also present in a number of other repositories as well. Developers have just made an important upgrade to it that should turn some heads.

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Love for Perl unites diverse community

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OSS

I've used Perl for several years, beginning in 2002 on Solaris, then moving to Debian and working on Koha in 2008. Surprisingly (bafflingly, in retrospect), I had not connected with the larger Perl community at all in that time, choosing to stay within the smaller communities I was already embedded in.

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Linux 4.2-rc6

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Linux

So last week I wasn't very happy about the state of the release candidates, but things are looking up. Not only is rc6 finally shrinking noticeably, the issues I was worried about had fixes come in early in the week, and so I don't have anything big pending. Assuming nothing new comes up, I suspect we will end up with the regular release schedule after all (ie in two weeks). Knock wood.

In -rc6 , the diffstat looks a bit odd, in that the ARC arch updates dominate (at around 30% of the diffs). That's partly because the rest is pretty small, and partly because the llock/scond livelock fix wasn't tiny. But I don't find it in myself to worry about it.

Apart from that ARC oddity, things look normal. Mostly drivers (gpu, sound, i2c, input, usb, thermal, you name it) and other architecture updates (mips and sparc). With some filesystem and VM fixes rounding up the changes.

But please go out and test, and make sure all the issues really are solved. Ok?

Linus

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Ubuntu Kylin 15.10 Beta 1 Is Out with Updated Software Center, Linux Kernel 4.1 LTS

As part of the release of Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Beta 1 for opt-in flavors, the Ubuntu Kylin team had the pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Beta build of the upcoming Ubuntu Kylin 15.10 distro. Read more Also: Kubuntu Wily Beta 1

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Croatian policy encourages open source adoption

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Is Office 365 cheaper than OpenOffice and open source?

Indeed, Microsoft's marketing team published a press release recently saying Office 365 is about 80% cheaper compared to the open source office suite, OpenOffice - with the figures stemming from reports in Italy and the City Council of Pesaro. The Redmond giant claims that to roll out Open Office, Pesaro incurred a one off cost of about €300,000 and had lots of problems with document formatting. But equally how would you convince a public sector organisation to migrate to your cloud services instead of using 'expensive' open source software? The obvious way would be to present a case study from a similar organisation together with a well written report commissioned to an "independent" consultancy firm. At this point your future customer has all the data and justifications required to sign on the dotted line. And some journalists are now presenting this case as fact of Microsoft Office 365 being 80% more economical than open source alternatives. I would argue that this is an isolated case and the PR efforts by big technology vendors, like many other methods, are being used to trick private and public organisations into signing contracts based on data or claims that may be not completely true. Read more