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Development

Software and Development: CodeBlocks, Cumulonimbus, LibreOffice, devRantron, GCC

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Development
Software
  • CodeBlocks – A Free & Cross-Platform C, C++ and Fortran IDE

    CodeBlocks is a free and open-source IDE for C, C++ and FORTRAN development. It features a consistent User Interface across all desktop platforms with a class browser, a tabbed interface, and its functions can be extended using plugins.

    It also features keyboard shortcuts, smart indentation, code folding, and a to-do list management panel that different users can use, among others. It is written in C++ and it does not require any interpreted languages or proprietary libraries.

  • Cumulonimbus: Terrible Name, Terrific Podcast Client

    Unlike many other Electron podcast apps I have come across on Github this one is still being developed, is easy to install, and it supports Linux.

  • LibreOffice Calc Is Finally Being Threaded

    While LibreOffice Calc for a while now has been offering OpenCL support for speeding up spreadsheet computations, with not all drivers/GPUs supporting OpenCL, this Microsoft Office alternative is finally receiving proper multi-threading support.

    Collabora developers have landed their initial work on multi-threading / parallelism as they look to speed-up the LibreOffice Calc spreadsheet program's calculations.

  • devRantron – An Unofficial Desktop Client for devRant Programmers

    devRantron is a free, open-source, and cross-platform (unofficial) desktop client for the famous Dev Rant Android and iOS social media application for programmers, developers, and designers.

    Before now, devRant was only accessible on the mobile phones, but now users can post complaints and follow up on rants by developers from all around the globe even while working on their desktops and it’s thanks to a group of friends who concluded that devRant was taking too long to deliver a desktop client.

  • The New Compiler Features & Changes Of GCC 8

    With GCC 8 feature development over and onto bug fixing, here is a look at some of the changes to find with the GCC 8 compiler stack that will be released as stable early next year in the form of GCC 8.1.

Qt 5.9.3 Released

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Development
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.9.3 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.3 does not add any new functionality, focus is in bug fixes and performance improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.2, the new Qt 5.9.3 contains over 100 bug fixes and in total more than 500 changes since Qt 5.9.2. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.3.

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Programming and howtos: Python, Swift and Recipes

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Development
HowTos

Programming Leftovers

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Development

Programming: Swift, Brilliant Jerks in Engineering, and Career Path for Software Developers

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Development
  • Swift code will run on Google's Fuchsia OS

    A few days ago, there was a flash-in-the-pan controversy over Google "forking" Apple's open-source programming language Swift. After a few minutes of speculation over whether Google was going to make its own special flavor of the language for its own purposes, Swift's creator Chris Lattner (who now works at Google) helpfully clarified the situation:

  • Brilliant Jerks in Engineering

    This are numerous articles and opinions on the topic, including Brilliant Jerks Cost More Than They Are Worth, and It's Better to Avoid a Toxic Employee than Hire a Superstar. My colleague Justin Becker is also giving a talk at QConSF 2017 on the topic: Am I a Brilliant Jerk?.

    It may help to clarify that "brilliant jerk" can mean different things to different people. To illustrate, I'll describe two types of brilliant jerks: the selfless and the selfish, and their behavior in detail. I'll then describe the damage caused by these jerks, and ways to deal with them.

    The following are fictional characters. These are not two actual engineers, but are collections of related traits to help examine this behavior beyond the simple "no asshole rule." These are engineers who by default act like jerks, not engineers who sometimes act that way.

  • [Older] The missing career path for software developers

    You started hacking on technology thrilled with every stroke of the key, making discoveries with every commit. You went about solving problems, finding new challenges. You were happy for a while, until you hit a plateau. There was a choice to be made. Continue solving the same problems or start managing others. You tried it out, and hated it. Longing to focus on technology, not people, you turned to your open source project. When it became successful, you became an open source maintainer but ended up overwhelmed and burned out. Hoping to get back to doing work that fascinates you, you went work for yourself. Lacking experience running a business, you're crushed with all the decisions you need to make. You’re nearing burnout — again. It feels like you’re on a hamster wheel.

Debian Developers

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Development
Debian
  • Joey Hess: stupid long route

    Yesterday, I surpassed all that, and I did it in a way that hearkens right back to the original story. I had two computers, 20 feet apart, I wanted one to talk to the other, and the route between the two ended up traveling not around the Earth, but almost the distance to the Moon.

    I was rebuilding my home's access point, and ran into a annoying bug that prevented it from listening to wifi. I knew it was still connected over ethernet to the satellite receiver.

    I connected my laptop to the satellite receiver over wifi. But, I didn't know the IP address to reach the access point. Then I remembered I had set it up so incoming ssh to the satellite receiver was directed to the access point.

  • I am now a Debian Developer

    On the 6th of April 2017, I finally took the plunge and applied for Debian Developer status. On 1 August, during DebConf in Montréal, my application was approved. If you’re paying attention to the dates you might notice that that was nearly 4 months ago already. I was trying to write a story about how it came to be, but it ended up long. Really long (current draft is around 20 times longer than this entire post). So I decided I’d rather do a proper bio page one day and just do a super short version for now so that someone might end up actually reading it.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Programming: GNU Nano, Software Engineering Talent Shortage, HHVM (PHP)

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Development
GNU
  • GNU Nano Latest Version 2.9.0

    GNU nano 2.9.0 "Eta" introduces the ability to record and
    replay keystrokes (M-: to start and stop recording, M-;
    to play the macro back), makes ^Q and ^S do something
    useful by default (^Q starts a backward search, and ^S
    saves the current file), changes ^W to start always a
    forward search, shows the number of open buffers (when
    more than one) in the title bar, no longer asks to press
    Enter when there are errors in an rc file, retires the
    options '--quiet' and 'set quiet' and 'set backwards',
    makes indenting and unindenting undoable, will look in
    $XDG_CONFIG_HOME for a nanorc file and in $XDG_DATA_HOME
    for the history files, adds a history stack for executed
    commands (^R^X), does not overwrite the position-history
    file of another nano, and fixes a score of tiny bugs.

  • GNU Nano Text Editor Can Now Record & Replay Keystrokes

    GNU Nano 2.9 is now available as the latest feature release of this popular CLI text editor and it's bringing several new capabilities.

    First up, GNU Nano 2.9 has the ability to record and replay keystrokes within the text editor. M-: is used to start/stop the keystroke recording session while M-; is used to playback the macro / recorded keystrokes.

  • 2018's Software Engineering Talent Shortage— It’s quality, not just quantity

    The software engineering shortage is not a lack of individuals calling themselves “engineers”, the shortage is one of quality — a lack of well-studied, experienced engineers with a formal and deep understanding of software engineering.

  • HHVM 3.23

    HHVM 3.23 is released! This release contains new features, bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places, however we have rotated the GPG key used to sign packages; see the installation instructions for more information.

  • Facebook Releases HHVM 3.23 With OpenSSL 1.1 Support, Experimental Bytecode Emitter

    HHVM 3.23 has been released as their high performance virtual machine for powering their Hack programming language and current PHP support.

    As mentioned back in September though, Facebook will stop focusing on PHP 7 compatibility in favor of driving their own Hack programming language forward. It's after their next release, HHVM 3.24, in early 2018 they will stop their commitment to supporting PHP5 features and at the same time not focus on PHP7 support. Due to the advancements made by upstream PHP on improving their performance, etc, Facebook is diverting their attention to instead just bolstering Hack and thus overtime the PHP support within HHVM will degrade.

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

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Development
  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018

    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself.

    With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.

  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support

    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.

  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser

    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing.

    Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.

Development of Linux 4.15

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Development
Linux
  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15

    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.

  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15

    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening.

    Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.

  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code

    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

Linux 4.15 Development Updates

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Development
Linux
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Security: Firefox "Breach Alerts", Uber Crack, and Intel Back Doors

  • Firefox “Breach Alerts” Will Warn If You Visit A ‘Hacked’ Website
    One more thing is coming to add to the capabilities of the recently released Firefox 57 aka Firefox Quantum. Mozilla is working on a new feature for Firefox, dubbed Breach Alerts, which will warn users when they visit a website, whether it was hacked in the past or not.
  • GCHQ: change your passwords now even if Uber says it contained the breach
    Uber claims to have paid $100,000 to secure 57 million accounts exposed in a breach last year, but the UK's spy agency, GCHQ, suggests consumers don't place too much faith in Uber’s claim. The GCHQ's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) on Thursday published guidance for Uber users, reminding those affected by the firm’s just revealed 2016 breach they should take precautionary action even if their personal details may not have been compromised. The agency warned that Uber drivers and riders should “immediately change passwords” that were used for Uber.
  • Drive-By Phishing Scams Race Toward Uber Users
    Indeed, hardly any time elapsed after Uber came clean Tuesday about the year-old breach it had concealed before crack teams of social engineers unleashed appropriately themed phishing messages designed to bamboozle the masses (see Fast and Furious Data Breach Scandal Overtakes Uber).
  • EU authorities consider creating data breach justice league to tackle uber hack
    Multiple investigations prompted by Uber's admission that it concealed a hack could join together for one big mega-probe into the incident. An EU working group which has responsibility for data protection will decide next week whether to co-ordinate different investigations taking place in the UK, Italy, Austria, Poland and the Netherlands.
  • Intel Didn't Heed Security Experts Warnings About ME [Ed: Intel refused to speak about back doors until it became too mainstream a topic, then pretended it's a "bug"]
    For nearly eight years, the chip maker has been turning a deaf ear on security warnings about the wisdom of Intel Management Engine.

today's howtos

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more