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Development

Flatpak Officially Released for Next-Generation, Standalone GNU/Linux Apps

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Development
GNU
Linux

Softpedia has been informed by GNOME Project's Allan Day about the official unveiling and general availability of the Flatpak project for various GNU/Linux operating systems.

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Qt News

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Development
KDE
  • The Qt Company Is Still Aiming To Get Qt 5.8 Out This Year

    This year has already encountered the releases of the much-delayed Qt 5.6 followed quite quickly by Qt 5.7.

  • QtWebKit Technology Preview 2
  • New Technology Preview Of QtWebKit

    There's a new technology preview release of QtWebKit for those wanting to use this formerly retired WebKit-based module instead of the newer QtWebEngine that makes use of Chromium's Blink engine.

    As covered earlier this month, QtWebKit has been aiming for a return by interested developers wishing to continue to leverage WebKit in Qt applications rather than moving over to Qt WebEngine. Konstantin Tokarev who has been leading the revival on QtWebKit announced the release of its second technology preview release.

Development News

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Development

4MRescueKit 18.0 Enters Beta, Adds Antivirus Live CD 18.0-0.99.2 & 4MParted 18.0

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Linux

Today, June 20, 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki proudly informed Softpedia about the general availability of a Beta release of his upcoming 4MRescueKit 18.0 Live CD project.

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SourceForge Seeks a Return to Relevancy

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Development
OSS

The new owners of SourceForge, once the primary code repository for open source projects, work to make good on a promise to restore a reputation that was tarnished by its former owners.

It’s been about 2 1/2 years since GIMP began what became something of a mass exodus of large open source projects away from SourceForge, which at one time had been the go-to code repository for open source projects.

The site’s reputation began to wane almost immediately after it was purchased from Geeknet in September, 2012, by Dice Holdings in a deal that included Slashdot and Freecode/Freshmeat. In July, 2013, Dice introduced DevShare, an optional profit sharing feature that included closed-source ad-supported content in the binary Windows installers and gave projects agreeing to use the feature a portion of the revenue.

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Development News (mostly Python)

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Development
  • Python 3.6 and 3.7 release cycles

    Ned Deily, who is the release manager for the upcoming Python 3.6 release and will "probably be the 3.7 release manager", led a session at the 2016 Python Language Summit to review and discuss the release cycle for the language. There have been some changes for 3.6 compared to the 3.5 cycle and there may be opportunities to make some additional changes for 3.7 and beyond.

  • PyCharm and type hints

    A mini-theme at this year's Python Language Summit was tools that are using the PEP 484 type hints. In the final session on that theme, Andrey Vlasovskikh, the community lead for the PyCharm IDE, described that tool's support for type hints.

  • An introduction to pytype

    Google's pytype tool, which uses the PEP 484 type hints for static analysis, was the subject of a presentation by one of its developers, Matthias Kramm, at the 2016 Python Language Summit. In it, he compared several different tools and their reaction to various kinds of type errors in the code. He also described pytype's static type-inference capabilities.

  • The state of mypy

    At last year's Python Language Summit, Guido van Rossum gave an introduction to "type hints", which are an optional feature to allow static checkers to spot type errors in Python programs. At this year's summit, he discussed mypy, which is one of several static type checkers for Python. It is being used by Dropbox, Van Rossum's employer, on its large Python codebase—with good results.

  • Python's GitHub migration and workflow changes

    Brett Cannon gave an update on the migration of Python's repositories to GitHub and the associated workflow changes at the 2016 Python Language Summit. The goal is modernize the development process; right now that process is "old school", which is "good or bad depending on who you ask". After looking at the options, GitHub seemed to be the best choice for housing the repositories; PEP 512 lays out the options and rationale for those interested. LWN looked at some of the discussion surrounding the move back in December 2014.

  • 20 Most Important Programming Languages In The World

    If we make a list of the most important programming languages, we’ll come across two categories. There are many vintage programming languages that just won’t die and continue to be used in their respective field. Along with them, there are some newer programming languages that have managed to make their mark upon the tech world.

Development News

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Development
  • Top 100 Most Popular Programming Languages Of 2016

    You might be familiarized with the top programming languages like C++, Java, Python, JavaScript etc., but there exists a vast pool of programming languages that you need to know about. All these languages have different strengths and applications that should be studied before learning them. Here, we are sharing a list of the top 100 most popular programming languages of 2016.

  • What cognitive linguistics can teach developers

    Chris Prather never metaphor he didn't like.

    That's what he tells developers, at any rate. And on stage at SouthEast LinuxFest in Charlotte, NC, Prather explained how a deep understanding of metaphor—and the critical role it plays in cognitive function—can improve an open source software developer's work. He delivered his presentation, "I Never Metaphor I Didn't Like: How Cognitive Linguistics Can Help You Be A (More) Bad-ass Developer," last Friday.

    Metaphors "are more than just flowery language, even though that's how they're taught to us in gradeschool and college," said Prather, CEO of Tamarou, a boutique Perl development shop.

  • How A Student Fooled 17,000 Coders Into Running His ‘Sketchy’ Programming Code

    Using the typosquatting technique, a German college student tricked more than 17,000 people from cybersecurity and programming community into clicking his fake software packages. More than half the time his code ran with administrative rights, affecting government and military organizations.

Development News

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Development
  • The Python Kids Club

    An 11-year-old asks her grandfather how computer games are made and he tells her they’re created by programmers “using complex mathematical code.” The next thing he knows, she’s learning Python on her own, and getting her chums involved too.

  • The Quest to Make Code Work Like Biology Just Took A Big Step

    In the early 1970s, at Silicon Valley’s Xerox PARC, Alan Kay envisioned computer software as something akin to a biological system, a vast collection of small cells that could communicate via simple messages. Each cell would perform its own discrete task. But in communicating with the rest, it would form a more complex whole. “This is an almost foolproof way of operating,” Kay once told me. Computer programmers could build something large by focusing on something small. That’s a simpler task, and in the end, the thing you build is stronger and more efficient.

Git 2.9

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Software
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More in Tux Machines

NVIDIA Linux Performance-Per-Dollar: What The RX 480 Will Have To Compete Against

There's a lot of benchmarking going on this weekend at Phoronix in preparation for next week's Radeon RX 480 Linux review. Here are some fresh results on the NVIDIA side showing the current performance-per-dollar data for the NVIDIA Maxwell and Pascal graphics cards for seeing what the RX 480 "Polaris 10" card will be competing against under Linux. Read more

RaspAnd Project Brings Android 6.0 Marshmallow to Raspberry Pi 3, Now with GAAPS

Android-x86 and GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has informed Softpedia today, June 25, 2016, about the immediate availability of a new build of his RaspAnd distribution for Raspberry Pi single-board computers. RaspAnd Build 160625 is the first to move the Android-x86-based distro to the latest Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow mobile operating system created by Google. And in the good tradition of the RaspAnd project, both Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and Raspberry Pi 2 Model B are supported. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 5 Released, Schedule So Far Going On Track
    The fifth alpha release of the huge FreeBSD 11.0 operating system update is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a wide range of other enhancements outlined via the in-progress release notes.
  • DragonFly's HAMMER2 File-System Sees Some Improvements
    The HAMMER2 file-system is going on four years in development by the DragonFlyBSD crew, namely by its founder Matthew Dillon. It's still maturing and taking longer than anticipated, but this is yet another open-source file-system.

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" to Ship with GCC 6 by Default, Binutils 2.27

Debian developer Matthias Klose has announced that the new GCC 6 compiler, which will be made the default GCC compiler for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, is now available in the Debian Testing repos. Debian users who are currently using Debian Testing can make GCC 6 the default compiler by installing the gcc/g++ packages from experimental. If installing it, they are also urged to help fix reported built failures in Debian Testing and Debian Unstable. Read more