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Development

Preview of Android O

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Android
Development
Google

New PyPy Releases

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Development

WebKitGTK+ 2.16

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GNOME

The Igalia WebKit team is happy to announce WebKitGTK+ 2.16. This new release drastically improves the memory consumption, adds new API as required by applications, includes new debugging tools, and of course fixes a lot of bugs.

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Development News/Languages

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Development
  • Principles for C programming

    In the words of Doug Gwyn, “Unix was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things”. C is a very powerful tool, but it is to be used with care and discipline. Learning this discipline is well worth the effort, because C is one of the best programming languages ever made. A disciplined C programmer will…

  • Growing Young FOSS Programmers With Help of Scratch and Al Sweigart

    If your young child is showing an interest in learning computers, an introduction to Scratch and these instructional videos by Al Sweigart might be in order.

  • The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017

    Besides the above plot, which can be difficult to parse even at full size, we offer the following numerical rankings. As will be observed, this run produced several ties which are reflected below (they are listed out here alphabetically rather than consolidated as ties because the latter approach led to misunderstandings). Note that this is actually a list of the Top 23 languages, not Top 20, because of said ties.

  • Algorithm Time Complexity and Big O Notation

Development News:/Trools

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Development
  • Happy IDEs of March: Which code editor do you prefer?

    Welcome to the Ides of March, or as we'd like to call it, the IDEs of March. To celebrate, we're asking our readers to let us know which code editing tool they prefer, whether a full-fledged integrated development environment or a simple text editor. Fortunately, there are tons of open source options out there for you to choose from. Which one is your favorite?

  • There’s More to Life Than Code: How to Keep Your Team Engaged

    She found that her engineers actually were most productive when they not only felt like they were part of an engineering team, but when they felt like they were a part of the entire company. When Rent The Runway created cross-functional teams -- with people from all departments working together to solve single problems -- her engineers were at their happiest and most productive.

  • Teaching Children to Code

    Two experiences in my life have shaped the way I try to talk about technology. One was over ten years ago when I taught a room full of retirees, long-term unemployed, and recent immigrants basic computer skills. I realized that I could throw many of the subjects I had studied out of the window and that the best way to teach people was to give them a reason to learn. Fast forward to last year (and a subject I wrote previously on SitePoint) when I taught programming to a group of recent Syrian refugees. Again, I had to throw away much of my own learning and preconceptions and think afresh.

  • [Older] (Emacs) Bug report statistics on OS and arch

    If I tell you that one person is responsible for 10% of the 18500 Emacs bug reports over the past 9 years (next most enthusiastic is me with 2%), you can see that this effect can be significant.

  • [PostgreSQL] Parallel Query v2

    A recent Twitter poll asked What is your favorite upcoming feature of PostgreSQL V10? In this admittedly unscientific survey, "better parallelism" (37%) beat out "logical replication" (32%) and "native partitioning" (31%). I think it's fruitless to argue about which of those features is actually most important; the real point is that all of those are amazing features, and PostgreSQL 10 is on track to be an amazing release. There are a number of already-committed or likely-to-be-committed features which in any other release would qualify as headline features, but in this release they'll have to fight it out with the ones mentioned above.

  • Chromium Adds Support For Animated PNGs

    Google's Chrome/Chromium web-browser is introducing support for animated PNGs (APNG).

  • Life of free software project

    During last week I've noticed several interesting posts about challenges being free software maintainer. After being active in open source for 16 years I can share much of the feelings I've read and I can also share my dealings with the things.

    [...]

    Obviously if you can not cope with the work, let's find more people to do the work. Unfortunately it's not that easy. Sometimes people come by, contribute few patches, but it's not that easy to turn them into regular contributor. You should encourage them to stay and to care about the part of the project they have touched.

    You can try to attract completely new contributors through programs as Google Summer of Code (GSoC) or Outreachy, but that has it's own challenges as well.

    With phpMyAdmin we're participating regularly in GSoC (we've only missed last year as we were not chosen by Google that year) and it indeed helps to bring new people on the board. Many of them even stay around your project (currently 3 of 5 phpMyAdmin team members are former GSoC students). But I think this approach really works only for bigger organizations.

LLVM 4.0.0 Release

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Development
BSD
  • LLVM 4.0.0 Release

    It is my pleasure to announce that LLVM 4 is now available.

  • LLVM 4.0 Released

    Hans Wennborg has announced the release of LLVM 4.0 and connected sub-projects like Clang 4.0. LLVM/Clang 4.0 is a big update to this open-source compiler infrastructure stack and also marks the change to their new versioning scheme.

    For release highlights of LLVM/Clang 4.0, see our feature overview for the advancements made to this compiler stack over the past half-year. LLVM 4.0 was supposed to ship back in February but bugs had dragged out the release until today.

Development News

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Development
  • Open Source Firmware For A Cheap Programmable Power Supply

    A few months ago, someone clued us in on a neat little programmable power supply from the usual Chinese retailers. The DPS5005 is a programmable power supply that takes power from a big AC to DC wall wart and turns it into a tiny bench-top power supply. You can pick one of these things up for about thirty bucks, so if you already have a sufficiently large AC to DC converter you can build a nice 250 Watt power supply on the cheap.

    [Johan] picked up one of these tiny programmable power supplies. His overall impression was positive, but like so many cheap products on AliExpress, there wasn’t a whole lot of polish to the interface. Additionally, the DPS5005 lacked the ability to be controlled over a serial port or WiFi.

  • Secrets of Maintainable Codebases

    You should write maintainable code. I assume people have told you this, at some point. The admonishment is as obligatory as it is vague. So, I’m sure, when you heard this, you didn’t react effusively with, “oh, good idea — thanks!”

    If you take to the internet, you won’t need to venture far to find essays, lists, and stack exchange questions on the subject. As you can see, software developers frequently offer opinions on this particular topic. And I present no exception; I have little doubt that you could find posts about this on my own blog.

  • Facebook Brings HHVM To ARM 64-bit

    It looks like Facebook could be exploring more from ARM servers in their data centers as they have now brought their HHVM PHP implementation to AArch64.

Development News:/Trools

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Development
  • IBM adds new API to quantum computing cloud service

    IBM announced today that it was updating its Quantum Experience cloud with a new API that it hopes will increase the abilities of researchers and other interested parties to build more sophisticated applications with its experimental quantum computing system.

  • IBM Expands Quantum Computing Efforts

    IBM is moving forward in its effort to enable the era of quantum computing, with a new Application Program Interface (API) that gives developers the ability to build quantum programs that could interface with current computing systems, via the IBM cloud.

    [...]

    As such, the actual quantum hardware is not physically managed using IBM's cloud technologies. In a cloud model, systems are set up as multi-tenant environments with many different services and applications running concurrently.

  • Top 20 Most Popular Programming Languages in 2017

    The software engineering craft has been steadily growing in popularity for the past couple of decades. The innovations in technological startups and companies depending on digital sales, along with groundbreaking research in AI and the latest developments in Internet of things, are promising for technical professionals considering long-term opportunities in the software development industry.

  • C++17 Is Near, A Look At The New Features

    Reports out over the weekend indicate that C++17 is "done" as the next version of the C++ ISO standard.

    While no official announcements have been made yet about the state of C++17, previous communications have signaled that C++17 should be considered technically complete by the time of the ACCU conference happening at the end of April.

  • Zapcc 1.0 Compiler Announced

    Several times in the past we have covered Zapcc as an LLVM Clang based compiler focused on very fast compilation speeds. Zapcc 1.0 has been released today.

Top 4 JavaScipt code editors

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Development

JavaScript is everywhere, and its ubiquitous presence on the web is undeniable. Every app uses it in one form or another. And any developer who is serious about the web should learn JavaScript. If you already know it, be sure to continue learning new frameworks, libraries, and tools, because JavaScript is a living, evolving language.

The JavaScript community has a great open source environment, and that has led to some excellent open source JavaScript IDEs (Integrated Development Environments). The open source movement is strong, and there are many IDEs that you can use to code your JavaScript program.

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Red Hat Development

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Development
Red Hat
  • Systemd open issues after 233 release

    In May last year, we made good progress with the bug backlog. This was before the systemd-230 release. In November, we were preparing for systemd-232, a we made a nice dip too. After four more months of development, systemd-233 was released. I was a bit disappointed to see that this time we didn't make such visible progress...

  • Fedora Free Media programme group refresh

    Fedorahosted closed down at the end of last month. Unfortunately, Free Media has quite a few components and we haven't been able to migrate the pipeline to Pagure completely yet. In fact, we've temporarily closed Free Media down for the moment - the form says so too. Since we're re-doing the complete process and the infrastructure, we also decided to refresh the membership list.

  • Rawhide notes from the trail, the 2017-03-04 edition

    Well, branching of Fedora 26 off rawhide has come and gone, and it was a bit of a rocky ride this time sadly.

    The branched composes were failing at first, then working, but not actually syncing to the master mirrors in order for mirrormanager to notice it and people to you know, actually use it.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.