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Development

Programming: Programming Skills, Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0, DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community

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  • The Four Layers of Programming Skills

    When learning how to code for the first time, there's a common misconception that learning how to code is primarily about learning the syntax of a programming language. That is, learning how the special symbols, keywords, and characters must be written in the right order for the language to run without errors.

    However, focusing only on knowledge of syntax is a bit like practicing to write a novel by only studying grammar and spelling. Grammar and spelling are needed to write a novel, but there are many other layers of skills that are needed in order to write an original, creative novel.

    [...]

    This is the layer that is most often focused on in the early learning phase. Syntax skills essentially means how to read and write a programming language using the rules for how different characters must be used for the code to actually work.

  • Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0

    For those making use of Beignet for Intel graphics OpenCL acceleration on Linux, it finally has added support for LLVM 5.0.

    Beignet doesn't tend to support new LLVM versions early but rather a bit notorious for their tardiness in supporting new LLVM releases. LLVM 5.0 has been out for two weeks, so Beignet Git has moved on to adding support for LLVM 5.

    There were Beignet changes to libocl and GBE for enabling the LLVM 5.0 support.

  • DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community, the Premier Open Source Toolkit to Simplify End-to-End Web Development Processes

IBM open sources WebSphere Liberty code

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Server
OSS

Programming: OpenJ9, HHVM, and Good API Documentation

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  • IBM open-sources a microservices-friendly Java app server

    A few weeks ago, Nginx released its multilanguage microservices-friendly app server, but without Java support at launch. Now IBM has a beta build of its own microservices-friendly app server for Java applications: the open source Open Liberty, which implements IBM’s version of Java EE and MicroProfile microservices implementation.

    Open Liberty will provide a runtime supporting Java microservices that can be quickly updated and moved among different cloud environments. When combined with the Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine, OpenLiberty will provide a full Java stack, IBM said. (OpenJ9 had been IBM’s J9 JVM, which it contributed to the Eclipse Foundation that now manages Java EE.)

  • The Future of HHVM

    Several months ago, PHP officially announced the end-of-life for PHP5.

    The HHVM team is happy about the direction PHP has taken with PHP7, and we’re proud of the role we’ve played in pushing the language and runtime to where they are today. Since the PHP community is finally saying goodbye to PHP5, we’ve decided to do so as well.

  • The Ten Essentials for Good API Documentation

Debian Development Reports

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Debian
  • Free software log (July and August 2017)

    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years.

    After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125

    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

Development: RTOS, LipidFinder, Github Threat, and Stack Overflow Survey

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  • RTOS Primer, Part Two: Real Time Applications

    Employing Linux as an embedded RTOS has several advantages that make it highly attractive on a number of levels, specifically the most important concern these days, which seems to be cost. The second concern is security; Linux proves to be pretty secure in comparison to several common alternatives like Windows.

  • LipidFinder: An Open-Source Python Workflow for Novel Lipid Discovery

    Obtaining precise, high-quality lipidomic (or metabolomic) datasets comes with its challenges. One factor that I am sure comes to mind is the ability to minimize, or even better, eliminate those large numbers of artefacts that could otherwise hinder your mass spectrometry data analysis, to ensure accurate interpretation.

  • The Github threat

    The Github application belongs to a single entity, Github Inc, a US company which manage it alone. So, a unique company under US legislation manages the access to most of Free Software application code sources, which may be a problem with groups using it when a code source is no longer available, for political or technical reason.

  • Stack Overflow gives an even closer look at developer salaries

    Today, Stack Overflow announced a slightly more useful application for that same data, with the Stack Overflow Salary Calculator. Tell it where you live, how much experience and education you have, and what kind of developer you are, and it will tell you the salary range you should expect to make in five national markets (US, Canada, UK, France, Germany) and a handful of cities (New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Toronto, London, Paris, Berlin).

Programming: OpenJ9, SCons, and Adafruit NeoPixel Stick

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  • Some Early Tests Of The Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine

    With IBM's newly open-sourced J9 Java Virtual Machine as the Eclipse OpenJ9, I've run some quick benchmarks to get an idea how its performance is comparing to the de facto Java Virtual Machine, Hotspot.

  • SCons 3.0 Released

    For those that haven't jumped fully on the Meson build system bandwagon, the SCons 3.0 software construction utility is now available.

  • Small Glowing Thing

    Quite a while ago I obtained an Adafruit NeoPixel Stick. It was cheap enough to be an impulse buy but it took me some time to get around to actually doing something with it.

    I’ve been wanting to play a little more with the ATtiny range of microcontrollers so these things seemed to go together nicely. It turns out that getting an ATtiny programmed is actually rather simple using an Arduino as an ISP programmer. I’ve written up some notes on the procedure at the 57North Hacklab wiki.

Programming: HHVM, OpenJ9, and RcppClassic

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  • Facebook's HHVM To Focus More On Hack, No Longer Focusing On PHP7 Compatibility

    Some interesting remarks today by Facebook's HHVM/Hack language team as they plot their future agenda.

    First up, the HHVM 3.24 release due out in early 2018 will be their last release to commit to supporting PHP5. PHP5-specific features after that release may end up being dropped.

    Along with dropping PHP5 support, HHVM developers will no longer be focusing on PHP7 compatibility.

  • IBM's Eclipse OpenJ9 Is A Promising Open-Source JVM

    For those that missed the news over the weekend, IBM has open-sourced its in-house JVM and contributed it to the Eclipse Foundation. Eclipse OpenJ9 is this new, full-featured, enterprise-ready open-source Java Virtual Machine.

  • RcppClassic 0.9.7

    A rather boring and otherwise uneventful release 0.9.7 of RcppClassic is now at CRAN. This package provides a maintained version of the otherwise deprecated first Rcpp API; no new projects should use it.

Free Software Development

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OSS

Kernel: Linux Foundation, 4.14 RC1 and Graphics

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Linux
  • Linux Foundation head proclaims year of Linux desktop – from a Mac

    In what could well take the award for the most hypocritical tech statement of the year, Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin last week announced that 2017 was the year of the Linux desktop – while using a macOS machine for his presentation.

    Zemlin's statement was made during his keynote at the Open Source Summit 2017 that took place in Los Angeles from 11 to 14 September.

  • Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc1
  • The Exciting New Features Of The Linux 4.14 Kernel: Zstd, Vega Hugepages, AMD SME, New Drivers
  • The Graphics Talks Of The 2017 Open-Source Summit NA

    This week the Linux Foundation hosted their annual Open-Source Summit 2017 North America. There were two graphics talks this year led by Collabora developers.

    The slides for many of the talks from the 2017 Open-Source Summit NA can be found via the schedule page if hovering over a track.

    I've already covered some of the interesting ones like the Clear Linux GCC/GLIBC optimization approach while there were also just two Linux graphics talks of interest this year.

  • Experimental Nouveau Reclocking Patches Updated, Including For Maxwell GPUs

    Karol Herbst has sent out 29 updated patches on Friday for a major rework to the Nouveau clock related code for re-clocking and related functionality. This includes a "hacky workaround" for getting re-clocking to function on GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" GPUs.

    The 29 patches by this independent Nouveau contributor work on restoring clocks after a system suspend, fixed reclocking when entering suspend, initial support for thermal throttling and to trigger reclocking on temperature changes, the "hacky workaround" for Maxwell2 reclocking, a new debugfs file for changing the boost mode, and other related work.

  • [Old] The beginning of the end of the RadeonHD driver

    Soon it will be a decade since we started the RadeonHD driver, where we pushed ATI to a point of no return, got a proper C coded graphics driver and freely accessible documentation out. We all know just what happened to this in the end, and i will make a rather complete write-up spanning multiple blog entries over the following months. But while i was digging out backed up home directories for information, i came across this...

Python Growth and Possible Danger

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  • Python explosion blamed on pandas

    Not content to bait developers by declaring that Python is the fastest-growing major programming language, coding community site Stack Overflow has revealed the reason for its metastasis.

    Coming a day after Programmer Day, which falls on the 256th day of the year – except January 7: – the explanatory post by data scientist David Robinson could be flagged as an off-by-one error.

    But his case for the rise and rise of Python is no less plausible for its tardiness. Programmers love pandas.

    Not the black-and-white bamboo eaters, but the Python data science library. "Pandas is by a large margin the tag most visited by Python developers, which isn't surprising after we saw its earlier growth," Robinson explained.

  • Devs unknowingly use “malicious” modules snuck into official Python repository

    The official repository for the widely used Python programming language has been tainted with modified code packages, a computer security authority in Slovakia warned. The authority also said the packages have been downloaded by unwitting developers who incorporated them into software over the past three months.

    Multiple code packages were uploaded to the Python Package Index, often abbreviated as PyPI, and were subsequently incorporated into software multiple times from June through this month, Slovakia's National Security Authority said in an advisory published Thursday. The unidentified people who made available the code packages gave them names that closely resembled those used for packages found in the standard Python library. The packages contained the exact same code as the upstream libraries except for an installation script, which was changed to include a "malicious (but relatively benign) code."

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.