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Development

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Intel Is Working On A New ‘Data Parallel C++’ Programming Language

    ntel has been working on its OneAPI project for quite some time. The company has now shared more details of the software project — including the launch of a new programming language called “Data Parallel C++ (DPC++).”

  • 6 Best Data Science and Machine Learning Courses for Beginners

    Many programmers are moving towards data science and machine learning hoping for better pay and career opportunities --- and there is a reason for it. The Data scientist has been ranked the number one job on Glassdoor for last a couple of years and the average salary of a data scientist is over** $120,000** in the United States according to Indeed.

    Data science is not only a rewarding career in terms of money but it also provides the opportunity for you to solve some of the world's most interesting problems. IMHO, that's the main motivation many good programmers are moving towards data science, machine learning and artificial intelligence.

  • Find the smallest number within a list with python

    In this example, we will create a python function which will take in a list of numbers and then return the smallest value. The solution to this problem is first to create a place holder for the first number within the list, then compares that number with other numbers within the same list in the loop. If the program found a number which is smaller than the one in the place holder, then the smaller number will be assigned to that place holder.

  • Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

    To be useful, a program usually needs to communicate with the outside world by obtaining input data from the user and displaying result data back to the user. This tutorial will introduce you to Python input and output.

    Input may come directly from the user via the keyboard, or from some external source like a file or database. Output can be displayed directly to the console or IDE, to the screen via a Graphical User Interface (GUI), or again to an external source.

  • Want to level up your Python? Join Weekly Python Exercise, starting July 2nd

    Let’s face it: Stack Overflow has made developers’ lives easier. Almost every time I have a question, I find that someone on Stack Overflow has asked it, and that people have answered it, often in great detail.

    I’m thus not against Stack Overflow, not by a long shot. But I have found that many Python developers visit there 10 or even 20 times a day, to find answers (and even code) that they can use to solve their problems.

  • Introducing pytest-elk-reporter

    Few years back I’ve wrote a post about how I’ve connected python based test to ELK setup - “ELK is fun”, it was using an xunit xml, parsing it and sending it via Logstash.

    Over time I’ve learn a lot about ElasticSearch and it’s friend Kibana, using them as a tool to handle logs. and also as a backend for a search component on my previous job.

    So now I know logstash isn’t needed for reporting test result, posting straight into elasticsearch is easier and gives you better control, ES is doing anything “automagiclly” anyhow nowadays.

Programming/Development Leftovers

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Development
  • binb 0.0.4: Several nice improvements

    The fourth release of the binb package just arrived on CRAN. binb regroups four rather nice themes for writing LaTeX Beamer presentations much more easily in in (R)Markdown. As a teaser, a quick demo combining all four themes follows; documentation and examples are in the package.

  • Watermarking photos? "I can do that in Python!"

    The Python Image Library (PIL), although not in the standard library, has been Python’s best-known 2-D image processing library. It predated installers such as pip, so a “friendly fork” called Pillow was created. Although the package is called Pillow, you import it as PIL to make it compatible with the older PIL.

  • EuroPython 2019: Schedule is online

    Please make sure you book your ticket in the coming days. We will switch to late bird rates next week.
    If you want to attend the training sessions, please buy a training pass in addition to your conference ticket, or get a combined ticket. We only have very few training seats left.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Geir Arne Hjelle

    This week we welcome Geir Arne Hjelle (@gahjelle) as our PyDev of the Week! Geir is a regular contributor to Real Python. You can also find some of his work over on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Geir now!

  • Python's Mypy--Advanced Usage

    In my last article, I introduced Mypy, a package that enforces type checking in Python programs. Python itself is, and always will remain, a dynamically typed language. However, Python 3 supports "annotations", a feature that allows you to attach an object to variables, function parameters and function return values. These annotations are ignored by Python itself, but they can be used by external tools.

    Mypy is one such tool, and it's an increasingly popular one. The idea is that you run Mypy on your code before running it. Mypy looks at your code and makes sure that your annotations correspond with actual usage. In that sense, it's far stricter than Python itself, but that's the whole point.

    In my last article, I covered some basic uses for Mypy. Here, I want to expand upon those basics and show how Mypy really digs deeply into type definitions, allowing you to describe your code in a way that lets you be more confident of its stability.

  • One Of AMD's Leading LLVM Compiler Experts Jumped Ship To Unity

    AMD has lost one of their leading LLVM compiler developers as well as serving as a Vulkan/SPIR-V expert with being involved in those Khronos specifications.

    Neil Henning has parted ways with AMD and is now joining Unity Technologies. Neil was brought to AMD to improve the performance of their LLVM compiler, in particular their LLVM Pipeline Compiler (LLPC) used by the likes of their official AMD Vulkan driver in order to make it competitive with their long-standing, proprietary shader compiler currently used by their binary graphics drivers. While at AMD, he was able to increase the performance of their LLVM shader compiler stack by about 2x over the past year. He also implemented various Vulkan driver extensions into their stack.

  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 4 Report

    As this week was my last week in my exams I worked in many minor points to finish it and finish all missing parts for phase1.

Programming/Development Leftovers

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Development
  • What's the Most Secure Programming Language?

    WhiteSource recently put out a report, taking a deeper dive into the security of the most popular programming languages.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Plum UI Kit

    The mobile framework NativeScript team is releasing a new open-source project this week designed to help developers style their applications. The team calls the Plum UI Kit a “kitchen sink native app” meant to provide common app scenarios with copy-and-paste abilities.

  • Kedro Open Source library For Machine Learning

    A new open source development workflow framework for creating machine learning code has been released. Kedro has PySpark integration and an SDK for working with datasets.

    Kedro has been developed by QuantumBlack, an analytics firm acquired by McKinsey's in 2015, and the name Kedro derives from the Greek word meaning center or core. Kedro helps structure your data pipeline using software engineering principles. It also provides a standardized approach to collaboration for teams.

  • Prisons Are Banning Books That Teach Prisoners How to Code

    According to public records obtained by the Salem Reporter, the Oregon Department of Corrections has banned dozens of books related to programming and technology as they come through the mail room, ensuring that they don’t get to the hands of prisoners.

  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns

    Chan said he understands security concerns for books related to hacking, but they often see introductory or basic books disallowed.

Programming: PNG, AArch64, Python and Tor

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  • Segfaults and Twitter monkeys: a tale of pointlessness

    For a few years in the 1990s, when PNG was just getting established as a Web image format, I was a developer on the libpng team.

    One reason I got involved is that the compression patent on GIFs was a big deal at the time. I had been the maintainer of GIFLIB since 1989; it was on my watch that Marc Andreesen chose that code for use in the first graphics-capable browser in ’94. But I handed that library off to a hacker in Japan who I thought would be less exposed to the vagaries of U.S. IP law. (Years later, after the century had turned and the LZW patents expired, it came back to me.)

    Then, sometime within a few years of 1996, I happened to read the PNG standard, and thought the design of the format was very elegant. So I started submitting patches to libpng and ended up writing the support for six of the minor chunk types, as well as implementing the high-level interface to the library that’s now in general use.

    As part of my work on PNG, I volunteered to clean up some code that Greg Roelofs had been maintaining and package it for release. This was “gif2png” and it was more or less the project’s official GIF converter.

  • AArch64 support for ELF Dissector

    After having been limited to maintenance for a while I finally got around to some feature work on ELF Dissector again this week, another side-project of mine I haven’t written about here yet. ELF Dissector is an inspection tool for the internals of ELF files, the file format used for executables and shared libraries on Linux and a few other operating systems.

    [...]

    ELF Dissector had its first commit more than six years ago, but it is still lingering around in a playground repository, which doesn’t really do it justice. One major blocker for making it painlessly distributable however are its dependencies on private Binutils/GCC API. Using the Capstone disassembler is therefore also a big step towards addressing that, now only the use of the demangler API remains.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (clxxxiii) stackoverflow python report
  • denemo @ Savannah: Release 2.3 is imminent - please test.
  • Arguments | Another way to work with user inputs – Part 7
  • Call for setting up new obfs4 bridges

    BridgeDB is running low on obfs4 bridges and often fails to provide users with three bridges per request. Besides, we recently fixed a BridgeDB issue that could get an obfs4 bridge blocked because of its vanilla bridge descriptor: <https://bugs.torproject.org/28655>

    We therefore want to encourage volunteers to set up new obfs4 bridges to help censored users. Over the last few weeks, we have been improving our obfs4 setup guide which walks you through the process: <https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/PluggableTransports/obfs4proxy>p>

today's howtos and programming bits

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Development
HowTos

Development: bzip2, curl, debci and programming leftovers (C++, Python etc.)

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Development
  • Preparing the bzip2-1.0.7 release

    From bzip2-1.0.1 (from the year 2000), until bzip2-1.0.6 (from 2010), release tarballs came with a special Makefile-libbz2_so to generate a shared library instead of a static one.

    This never used libtool or anything; it specified linker flags by hand. Various distributions either patched this special makefile, or replaced it by another one, or outright replaced the complete build system for a different one.

  • Bzip2 Is About To See Its First Real Update In Close To A Decade

    The Bzip2 open-source compression program is about to see its first real release since September 2010. This new version brings new build systems, security fixes, and much more. 

    Earlier this month we wrote about Bzip2 seeing a revival under new maintainership. With Federico Mena-Quintero having taken the reigns from Bzip2 creator Julian Seward, he's busy working on this imminent 1.0.7 release as well as longer-term plans like potentially porting parts of the program to Rust.

  • Kids can be so crurl: Lead dev unchuffed with Google's plan to remake curl in its own image

    Google is planning to reimplement parts of libcurl, a widely used open-source file transfer library, as a wrapper for Chromium's networking API – but curl's lead developer does not welcome the "competition".

    Issue 973603 in the Chromium bug tracker describes libcrurl,"a wrapper library for the libcurl easy interface implemented via Cronet API".

    Cronet is the Chromium network stack, used not only by Google's browser but also available to Android applications.

  • Java and JavaScript remain the most popular programming languages

    That's according to State of Developer Ecosystem report out of JetBrains, which saw the firm survey 7,000 coders about key industry trends. The main takeaways are that Java is the most popular primary programming language; JavaScript is the most used overall; Go is the most promising; and Python is the most studied.

    69 per cent of developers (nice) have used JavaScript over the past 12 months, followed by HTML/CSS (61 per cent), SQL (56 per cent), Java (50 per cent), Python (49 per cent) and Shell scripting languages (40 per cent).

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 5: What is debci?

    After being asked sooo many times what am I doing for this internship, I think I never explained it well enough so that others could understand. Let me give it a try here.

    debci is short for “Debian Continuous Integration”, so I’ll start with a short definition of what “Continuous Integration” is then!

  • Token Based Authentication for Django Rest Framework

    Django is of the popular web development framework based on python having a large community and is used by many top websites presently. And Django Rest Framework, one of the most popular python package meant for Django to develop rest api’s and it made things really easier from authentication to responses each and everything.

  • Report from February 2019 ISO WG21 C++ Standards Committee Meeting

    The February 2019 ISO C++ meeting was held in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. As usual, Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting: I attended in the SG1 (parallelism and concurrency) group, Jonathan Wakely in Library, and Jason Merrill in the Core Working Group (see Jason’s report here). In this report, I’ll cover a few highlights of the meeting, focusing on the papers that were discussed.

    The first part of the week in SG1 was spent primarily on papers related to the Executors proposal (p0443). First up was “Integrating executors with the parallel algorithms” (p1019). SG1 also saw this paper at the Fall WG21 meeting in San Diego (see my Fall 2018 trip report). Much of the discussion around this paper in Kona centered on whether supplying an executor to an algorithm required that the algorithm must execute on the supplied executor. Currently, execution policies are just hints to the algorithm, and the algorithm is free to ignore the hint (e.g., some algorithms have no profitable parallelization, or parallelization may not be profitable for small input ranges, so an algorithm may ignore the user’s request for parallelization).

    We also spent some time trying to get a clearer definition of what counts as a Thread of Execution (ToE) in the context of p1019 (e.g., does a ToE imply TLS? What about fibers, SIMD lanes, etc.?) and the standard parallel algorithms, as well as how exceptions might be handled. Currently, exceptions in parallel algorithms terminate the calling program. The consensus was that we’d like to aim for executors supplied to algorithms to require that the algorithm strictly execute on the supplied executor. The author was asked to work on a subsequent revision of the paper with this guidance in mind. No conclusions were reached on the topic of exception propagation or what specifically constitutes a ToE in this context.

    Next, there was a brief discussion on an experience report I wrote for the Fall meeting (p1192). I had no new information on this paper for Kona but expect to bring either an update or a new paper based on work I will be doing to replace the default execution backend of the libstdc++ implementation of parallel algorithms from Intel’s Thread Building Blocks to a backend based on OpenMP.

  • 3D – Interactions with Qt, KUESA and Qt Design Studio, Part 1

    I’m a 3D designer, mostly working in blender. Sometimes I come across interesting problems and I’ll try to share those here. For example, trying to display things on low-end hardware – where memory is sometimes limited, meaning every polygon and triangle counts; where the renderer doesn’t do what the designer wants it to, that sort of thing. The problem that I’ll cover today is, how to easily create a reflection in KUESA or Qt 3D Studio.

    Neither KUESA or Qt 3D Studio will give you free reflections. If you know a little about 3D, you know that requires ray tracing software, not OpenGL. So, I wondered if there would be an easy way to create this effect. I mean, all that a reflection is, is a mirror of an object projected onto a plane, right? So, I wondered, could this be imitated?

  • Linear Regression in Python

    Linear Regression is a supervised statistical technique where we try to estimate the dependent variable with a given set of independent variables. We assume the relationship to be linear and our dependent variable must be continuous in nature.

  • Announcing GitLabracadabra 0.2.1

    Mid-October I started at work a tool in Python to create and update our projects hosted in our GitLab instance.

  • Kubernetes 1.15 Releaased, Offensive Security Reveals the 2019-2020 Roadmap for Kali Linux, Canonical Releases a New Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS, Vivaldi 2.6 Now Available, and Mathieu Parent Announces GitLabracadabra

    Mathieu Parent today announces GitLabracadabra 0.2.1. He started working on the tool to in Python to create and update projects in GitLab. He notes that "This tool is still very young and documentation is sparse, but following the 'release early, release often' motto I think it is ready for general usage."

  • Let’s Build A Simple Interpreter. Part 15.

    Before moving on to topics of recognizing and interpreting procedure calls, let’s make some changes to improve our error reporting a bit. Up until now, if there was a problem getting a new token from text, parsing source code, or doing semantic analysis, a stack trace would be thrown right into your face with a very generic message. We can do better than that.

    To provide better error messages pinpointing where in the code an issue happened, we need to add some features to our interpreter. Let’s do that and make some other changes along the way. This will make the interpreter more user friendly and give us an opportunity to flex our muscles after a “short” break in the series. It will also give us a chance to prepare for new features that we will be adding in future articles.

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Getting Started with Rust: Working with Files and Doing File I/O

    This article demonstrates how to perform basic file and file I/O operations in Rust, and also introduces Rust's ownership concept and the Cargo tool. If you are seeing Rust code for the first time, this article should provide a pretty good idea of how Rust deals with files and file I/O, and if you've used Rust before, you still will appreciate the code examples in this article.

  • PyCharm 2019.2 EAP 4

    This week’s Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm can now be downloaded from our website.

  • The First Step in Contributing to Open Source Projects

    I've been "programming" in Python for a while now, enough to be dangerous as they say. I've learned enough to be able to help others from time to time, but new enough that I still get distracted by the next shiny package I hear about on a podcast.

    I recently decided that, to help progress me further and to give back a little, I would help contribute to a package. I've heard the call to arms a few times, "Update the documentation, fix the bugs, build new features!". It's the Emerald City of the open source world. Being able to give back to the community that gives me something I enjoy so much was something that couldn't be ignored.

    But where to start? PyPI has over 100,000 packages, how does one just randomly pick one? Do I pick a well known product? Surely they can always use the help, but the large packages are so refined. With dozens of contributors already helping how could I possibly add something of value? Is it better to go for a smaller package? Find one that still needs work?

  • Python Pandas : Drop columns from Dataframe
  • What's the difference between PyQt5 and PySide2?
  • #135 macOS deprecates Python 2, will stop shipping it (eventually)
  • For Loop – Python Programming
  • EuroPython 2019: Beginners’ Day Workshop
  • GNU Guile: GNU Guile 2.2.5 released

    We are pleased to announce GNU Guile 2.2.5, the fifth bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series. This release represents 100 commits by 11 people since version 2.2.4. It fixes bugs that had accumulated over the last few months, notably in the SRFI-19 date and time library and in the (web uri) module. This release also greatly improves performance of bidirectional pipes, and introduces the new get-bytevector-some! binary input primitive that made it possible.

Programming/Development Leftovers

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  • ‘I code in my dreams too’, say developers in Jetbrains State of Developer Ecosystem 2019 Survey

    Last week, Jetbrains published its annual survey results known as The State of Developer Ecosystem 2019. More than 19,000 people participated in this developer ecosystem survey. But responses from only 7000 developers from 17 countries were included in the report. The survey had over 150 questions and key results from the survey are published, complete results along with the raw data will be shared later. Jetbrains prepared an infographics based on the survey answers they received. Let us take a look at their key takeaways:

  • Python and "dead" batteries

    Python is, famously, a "batteries included" language; it comes with a rich standard library right out of the box, which makes for a highly useful starting point for everyone. But that does have some downsides as well. The standard library modules are largely maintained by the CPython core developers, which adds to their duties; the modules themselves are subject to the CPython release schedule, which may be suboptimal. For those reasons and others, there have been thoughts about retiring some of the older modules; it is a topic that has come up several times over the last year or so.

    It probably had been discussed even earlier, but a session at the 2018 Python Language Summit (PLS) is the starting point this time around. At that time, Christian Heimes listed a few modules that he thought should be considered for removal; he said he was working on a PEP to that end. PEP 594 ("Removing dead batteries from the standard library") surfaced in May with a much longer list of potentially dead batteries. There was also a session at this year's PLS, where Amber Brown advocated moving toward a much smaller standard library, arguing that including modules in the standard library stifles their growth. Some at PLS seemed to be receptive to Brown's ideas, at least to some extent, though Guido van Rossum was apparently not pleased with her presentation and "stormed from the room".

  • When and How to Win With New Programming Languages
  • Understanding Data Ops and it's impact on Application Quality

Programming: Firefox Binaries, Python, GCC, Kotlin, C++ and Rust

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  • Stack Write Traffic In Firefox Binaries

    I became interested in how much CPU memory write traffic corresponds to "stack writes". For x86-64 this roughly corresponds to writes that use RSP or RBP as a base register (including implicitly via PUSH/CALL). I thought I had pretty good intuitions about x86 machine code, but the results surprised me.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: membernator -- validate membership cards

    I currently work part-time for student unions in Montreal and they often have large general assemblies (more than 2000 people). As you can likely figure out by yourself, running through paper lists to validate people's identity is a real PITA and takes quite a long time.

    For example, even if you have 4 people checking names, if validating someone's identity takes 5 seconds on average (that's pretty fast), it takes around 40 minutes to go through 2000 people.

    Introducing membernator, a python program written using pygame that validates membership cards against a CSV database! The idea is to use barcode scanners to scan people's school ID cards and see if they are in our digital lists. Hopefull, it will make our GA process easier for everyone.

  • Developer Toolset 8.1 and GCC 8.3 now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Developer Toolset delivers GCC, GDB, and a set of complementary development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to share that Developer Toolset 8.1 with GCC 8.3 is now available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

    The Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 release includes many enhancements and changes, but here are a few of the highlights...

  • Finished converting all the buildfiles to groovy and downgraded to gradle 4.4.1; week 3+ update

    During the third week I mainly spent my time converting all the buildfiles in the "dist" task graph to groovy from kotlin-dsl.

    I finished converting all the build files from kotlin-dsl to groovy. I then proceeded to build the entire project with only the subprojects required for the dist task so that we can avoid converting all the uneeded subproject buildfiles to groovy. Ran tests on the binary obtained from the newly onverted project and compared it to the test result on an original unconverted project. Since the new project only contains the needed subprojects this new project is unable to run all the needed tests. So inorder to overcome this we copy the binaries built by our new project and run the tests using the original unaltered projects. The compiler test task we need is "compilerTest"; this is the only aplicalbe test for out build binary from the "dist" task. I have run "distTest" for the unaltered project and uploaded it here; "distTest" task encompasses compilerTest task within it. Here is the log of the "compilerTest" run on the geenrated binaries.

  • Intel Developing "Data Parallel C++" As Part Of OneAPI Initiative

    Intel announced an interesting development in their oneAPI initiative: they are developing a new programming language/dialect.

    Intel originally began talking about oneAPI last December for optimizing code across CPUs / GPUs / FPGAs and as part of "no transistor left behind." Early details sounded similar to HSA while with time more bits have become known while the big reveal isn't expected until Q4'2019 when it will enter beta.

    We've known OpenCL will take a big role and their LLVM upstreaming effort around their SYCL compiler back-end. The SYCL single-source C++ programming standard from The Khronos Group we've expected Intel to use as their basis for oneAPI while now it seems they are going a bit beyond just targeting SYCL.

  • You can't buy DevOps [Ed: Poor article about mere buzzwords]
  • This Week in Rust 291

Programming: Lucid Vision Labs, Librem 5, Instana, Python and GNU

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  • Time-of-Flight camera is powered by Jetson TX2

    Lucid Vision Labs unveiled a MIPI-CSI2 equipped “Helios Embedded” version of its new Helios Time of Flight 3D camera that combines a Jetson TX2 with a Sony DepthSense IMX556PLR ToF sensor with under-5mm accuracy at 0.3 to 1.5 meters.

    Time-of-Flight (ToF) technology spans a range of infrared laser scanners from 3D imaging and navigation systems found on autonomous robots and self-driving cars to the camera flash mechanism inside the Huawei Honor View 20 phone. Most ToF cameras are controlled from a Windows or Linux PCs, such as the Basler ToF Camera, the Terabee 3Dcam 80×60, or Lucid Vision Labs’ Helios ToF Camera, which was announced last October and is due to ship later this month. Now Lucid has announced a similar Helios Embedded version of the Helios ToF due in Q4 2019 that can operate autonomously thanks to its Jetson TX2 module.

  • Librem 5 June Software Update

    Hi everyone! The Librem 5 team has been hard at work, and we want to update you all on our software progress.

    Conferences

    A couple of blog posts back, we mentioned that our hardware engineer gave a talk at KiCon—and it is available for watching now!

    Also, recently Tobias Bernard attended the Libre Graphics Meeting, where he had lots of conversation around the future photo viewing application for the Librem 5 phone.

  • Instana Releases Red Hat OpenShift Kubernetes Operator Built on Quarkus

    Red Hat OpenShift introduced Kubernetes (K8s) Operator support with version 3.11. Since that time, the number of Operators created by the OpenShift community has been steadily growing. Instana introduced our Red Hat OpenShift Kubernetes Operator at Red Hat Summit 2019, and will be demonstrating our K8s capabilities at KubeCon Barcelona this week.

  • Book Contest: Creating GUI Applications with wxPython
  • How to Use Python lambda Functions
  • Event - GNU Hackers Meeting (Madrid, Spain)

    Twelve years after its first edition in Orense, the GNU Hackers Meeting (2019-09-04–06) will help in Spain again. This is an opportunity to meet, hack, and learn with other free software enthusiasts.

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On the Road to Fedora Workstation 31

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Videos: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0, Enso OS 0.3.1, OpenShift and Upbound

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 overview | The best! ...until OpenMandriva does better.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Enso OS 0.3.1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Enso OS 0.3.1. Enjoy!

  • Video from KubeCon 2019: Red Hat in Barcelona

    From May 21-25, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage rolled into KubeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, a rare chance to bring different parts of the Red Hat community together from across Europe and the U.S. While there, we took the opportunity to sit down with members of the teams that are shaping the next evolution of container native storage in Red Hat OpenShift and throughout the Kubernetes ecosystem. We’ve put together highlights from Barcelona, where you’ll see what happens when you gather 7,700 people from the Kubernetes ecosystem in one place. You’ll also hear from members of Red Hat’s team in Barcelona—Distinguished Engineer Ju Lim, Senior Architect Annette Clewett, Rook Senior Maintainer Travis Nielsen and others—about what’s exciting them now, and what’s ahead.

  • Bassam Tabbara: Next 10 Years Should Be About Open Cloud

    During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Barcelona, we sat down with Bassam Tabbara – CEO and founder of Upbound to talk about the company he is building to make the next decade about Open / Open Source Cloud, breaking away from the proprietary cloud. Tabbara shared his insights into how AWS, Azure and the rest leverage open source technologies to create the proprietary clouds. He wants to change that.

189 Lives Changed - By Linux

I've been at this business of putting Linux-powered computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged kids since 2005, one way or the other. That's 14 years and north of 1670 computers placed. Throughout those years, I've shared with you some of our successes, and spotlighted the indomitable spirit of the Free Open Source Community and The Linux Community as a whole. I've also shared with you the lowest of the low times for us, and me personally. But through it all, Reglue has maintained our mission of placing first-time computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged students. By onesies and twosies mostly. A multi-machine learning center here and there, by far the greatest is the Bruno Knaapen Technology Learning Center. And as much of a challenge as that was, we have another project of even greater measure. If you don't know who Bruno Knaapen is, I suggest you follow the link. Bruno will go down in history as a person who helped more people adapt to Linux than anyone, at any time. Bruno's online contributions are still a treasure trove of Linux knowledge. So much, individuals pay out of their pocket to make sure that information remains available. Going down that list, you will come to understand the tenacity and knowledge that man shared with his community. I was one of those that learned at his elbow. Read more