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Development

Cross-compilation, D Language in GCC, and Complexity

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Development
GNU
  • Free and ready-to-use cross-compilation toolchains

    For all embedded Linux developers, cross-compilation toolchains are part of the basic tool set, as they allow to build code for a specific CPU architecture and debug it. Until a few years ago, CodeSourcery was providing a lot of high quality pre-compiled toolchains for a wide range of architectures, but has progressively stopped doing so. Linaro provides some freely available toolchains, but only targetting ARM and AArch64. kernel.org has a set of pre-built toolchains for a wider range of architectures, but they are bare metal toolchains (cannot build Linux userspace programs) and updated infrequently.

  • D Language accepted for inclusion in GCC

    I am pleased to announce that the GCC Steering Committee has accepted the D Language front-end and runtime for inclusion in GCC and appointed Iain Buclaw as maintainer.

  • Is Complexity Bad?

    You can essentially think of complexity as a distinction between two different types. Accidental and necessary complexity. Necessary complexity is okay, but accidental complexity will absolutely ruin your day as a programmer.

PyCharm IDE and LWN Coverage From the 2017 Python Language Summit

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Development

KDE/Qt: Krita, GCompris, Compiler Explorer and Qt

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Development
KDE

New Python Primers

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Development
  • 3 mistakes to avoid when learning to code in Python

    It's never easy to admit when you do things wrong, but making errors is part of any learning process, from learning to walk to learning a new programming language, such as Python.

    Here's a list of three things I got wrong when I was learning Python, presented so that newer Python programmers can avoid making the same mistakes. These are errors that either I got away with for a long time or that that created big problems that took hours to solve.

  • Are you a Python coder?

    It seems like every day I'm coming across a new project written in Python.

    And really, this should be no surprise. Python is a general-purpose language which works great in a variety of environments; it abstracts away a lot of the complexities of underlying systems, which giving you access to them whenever you need them. While both the language itself and toolchain around it help make it a great language for beginners, it is powerful enough to run some of the world' most complex websites and applications, including entire data centers with the OpenStack project.

Ubuntu Development Updates: GDM, Kernel, and Ubuntu Phone

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Development
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Proceeding With Transition From LightDM To GDM

    As part of the switch over to the GNOME Shell desktop environment by default for Ubuntu 17.10, they are also abandoning the LightDM display/log-in manager in favor of GNOME's GDM.

  • [Ubuntu] Kernel Team Summary: June 22, 2017

    We intend to target a 4.13 kernel for the Ubuntu 17.10 release. The Ubuntu 17.10 Kernel Freeze is Thurs Oct 5, 2017.

  • Ubuntu Phone project failed because it was a mess: claim

    A developer who worked with the Ubuntu Phone project has outlined the reasons for its failure, painting a picture of confusion, poor communication and lack of technical and marketing foresight.

    Simon Raffeiner stopped working with the project in mid-2016, about 10 months before Canonical owner Mark Shuttleworth announced that development of the phone and the tablet were being stopped.

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available

    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now

    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing.

    After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.

  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?

    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right Sad And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

OpenBSD Development News

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Development
BSD
  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job

    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.

Development: PHP 7.2 Alpha, Python Community, and More

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Development
  • PHP 7.2 Alpha 2 Released

    The second alpha release of the upcoming PHP 7.2 is now available for testing.

    PHP 7.2 Alpha 2 contains a number of fixes, updated SQLite3, SQLite3 support for writing to blobs, some compatibility improvements, and other work as outlined via the NEWS file. This second alpha comes just a few weeks after the first PHP 7.2 alpha.

  • Updates on my Python community work: 16-17

    At FOSSASIA, we had many professionals attending the talks, and the kids were having their own workshops. There were various other Python talks in different tracks as well.

  • Do you have what it takes to be a software developer?

    The language that finds itself on the top of the mountain is Java. Being around open source software for over 15 years, this was not always the case. Early on, we did not see a lot of interest in Java developers, but boy has that changed. It is the definitive leader in the application space currently. While the numbers have not grown in the last six quarters, the sheer overall number is impressive. On average, companies are asking for Java skills in over 1 in 3 job postings focused on FLOSS. Quite a feat for a language that did not register on the radar years ago. And, based on its heavy use with Android, it would not be a surprise to see this number increase in the future.

    Another language that is used prominently in the application space is C++. While its numbers can't quite compete with that of Java, it still commands a large marketshare in this arena. Whereas Java is asked for in 1 of 3 postings, C++ is required in 1 of 4. Much like that of Java, its numbers have remained relatively stable over the last six quarters. C++ has always been heavily utilized, and even though Java has superseded it, it remains a highly relevant language.

  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.3 (and 0.2.2)

    A new minor version 0.2.3 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN.

Programming: GCC and Java

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Development
GNU
  • D Language Support Cleared For Being Added To GCC

    The GCC Steering Committee has approved of allowing the D language front-end and runtime to be included as part of the GNU Compiler Collection.

  • Intel Posts Control-Flow Enforcement Support For GCC

    Last year Intel published a research whitepaper for Control-Flow Enforcement Technology (CET) while they have now posted a set of GCC patches for implementing this safeguard within the GCC compiler.

  • ARM's Cortex A55/A75 Get Tuned Up In GCC

    ARM's Cortex A55 and A75 processors have received their initial tuning support within the GCC 8 compiler code.

  • Mikeal Rogers: Node.js Will Overtake Java Within a Year

    Mikeal Rogers has been with the Node.js Foundation since day one. His job as community manager for the foundation involved hands-on oversight of operations, from communications and marketing to conference planning, to running board meetings. Rogers’ main contribution, though, is organization and coordination within the Node.js open source community — particularly in scaling governance and processes as the project has accelerated from a dozen early contributors to many hundreds.

Linux Development and Graphics

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds and Greg Kroah-Hartman both have new Linux in mind

    Linux lords Linus Torvalds and Greg Kroah-Hartman have clarified Linux's short term future.

    Torvalds took to the Kernel Mailing List to announced release candidate six of Linux 4.12, along with his fervent hope that “this would be a normal release cycle where rc7 is the last rc.”

    If so, that will mean Linux 4.12 will get its last release candidate next weekend and emerge on July 2nd.

    Another eight or nine weeks later we'll get Linux 4.13 and then it will be 4.14's turn in the spotlight.

  • NVMe Now Officially Faster for Emulated Controllers, Thanks to Collabora's Devs

    A year ago, we reported on the performance improvements brought by Collabora's developers to emulated NVMe devices, which were contributed as patches upstream in the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    The patches added huge performance improvements to emulated NVMe devices, but work didn't stop there, and Collabora's Helen Koike is now reporting on the official release in the NVMe Specification Revision 1.3 under the name "Doorbell Buffer Config command."

  • Another Batch Of AMDGPU Feature Updates For Linux 4.13

    Alex Deucher today submitted what is likely the final set of Radeon/AMDGPU feature updates to be queued in DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.13 kernel cycle.

    Previously submitted for the Radeon/AMDGPU DRM drivers targeting Linux 4.13 were the first round of AMD Raven Ridge graphics support, many Vega fixes, KIQ support for compute rings, MEC queue management rework, audio support for DCE6/SI hardware in AMDGPU, and module parameter changes for better handling SI/CIK behavior in the two drivers.

  • AMD Vega 56 and Vega 64 GPUs destined for iMac Pro detailed in Linux driver
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Latest From GNOME Builder and Older GNOME News (Catchup)

  • Code Search for GNOME Builder: Indexing
    Goal of Code Search for GNOME Builder is to provide ability to search all symbols in project fuzzily and jump to definition from reference of a symbol in GNOME Builder. For implementing these we need to have a database of declarations. So I created a plugin called ‘Indexer’ in Builder which will extract information regarding declarations and store them in a database.
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    I shared an interview with GSOC Winners a while back. In the same tradition, please allow me to share the interview of one of the four Debian Interns who were part of GNOME Outreachy the last season, Maria Glukova (shortening to Maria for convenience).

LibreOffice 5.3.4 immediately available for download

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces the availability of LibreOffice 5.3.4, the fourth minor release of the LibreOffice 5.3 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users. LibreOffice 5.3.4 integrates over 100 patches, with a significant number of fixes for interoperability with Microsoft Office RTF and OOXML documents. Read more

18 open source translation tools to localize your project

Localization plays a central role in the ability to customize an open source project to suit the needs of users around the world. Besides coding, language translation is one of the main ways people around the world contribute to and engage with open source projects. There are tools specific to the language services industry (surprised to hear that's a thing?) that enable a smooth localization process with a high level of quality. Categories that localization tools fall into include: Read more