Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

Java: Java EE, Java 9, "Confusing" APIs

Filed under
Development
  • Under Eclipse, changes to Java EE begin

    For one, Oracle is making the Java EE technology compatibility kits (TCK), which ascertain if an implementation is compliant with Java, available via open source. Eclipse Executive Director Milinkovich called this “a very fundamental change to the dynamics of this ecosystem.”

  • Java 9 Debuts with Jigsaw Modular Approach at JavaOne

    The Java Platform Standard Edition (Java SE) version 9 is now generally available bringing with it a number of new features to help make Java more modular and efficient. At the JavaOne conference in San Francisco on Oct. 2, Mark Reinhold Chief Architect, Java Platform Group at Oracle outlined some of the new Java 9 enhancements and provided insight on what's next.

    "Java 9 is here," Reinhold said. "That means that Jigsaw is here."

    Project Jigsaw is an effort that Oracle has been talking about since September 2010, just after the company completed its' acquisition of Sun Microsystems. Jigsaw is an effort to turn Java into a more modular stack, including a module subsystem to help make the programming language more efficient.

  • Secure coding in Java: Bad online advice and confusing APIs

    For programmers and software developers, the Internet forums provide a great place to exchange knowledge and seek answers to concrete coding conundrums. Alas, they are not always the source of accurate information.

Programming: FreeBSD, 'Outraged' Programmers, and Kid Programmers

Filed under
Development
  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Second Quarter 2017

    Much of the development work done this quarter was not particularly visible, especially the effort needed to ensure the upcoming 11.1 release has as few regressions as possible. Planning is also well under way for the 10.4 maintenance release which will quickly follow it.

    Further work focused on moving the arm architectures' support closer to tier-1 status and improving documentation. In addition, large changes were made to the src and ports trees.

  • Outraged programmers forced a rare concession from Facebook on its open-source software
  • Kids can't code without computers

    Hour of Code is a global movement that aims to demystify code by introducing students and teachers to the basics of programming through direct participation in open source software projects. It currently reaches tens of millions of students in almost 200 countries. Similarly, Kids Can Code teaches children to code, based on the belief that a basic understanding of software engineering provides a set of fundamental skills that is vital to both to the child's future and that of the global economy. Kids That Code offers unique programs in which children learn computer programming, game development, website creation, electronics, and more. Google’s Code-In is an annual programming competition for high school and secondary school students aged 13-17. The program encourages young people to complete tasks specified by various partnering open source organizations. These are just a few examples of the growing numbers of communities working to introduce and foster interest in software development and open source software. Tools such as Alice, Hackety Hack, Scratch, and others provide a platform along with activities and resources for teaching and learning.

    But there's a catch: Students can't participate in any of these valuable programs—nor can they use Alice, Hackety Hack, Scratch, or any other software—if they don't have a computer.

Server/Development: GNU Emacs. HHVM 3.22, Container Linux by and Microservice Architectures

Filed under
Development
Server
  • GNU Emacs: A Great Text Editor For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Emacs text editor doesn't need any introduction because it is quite famous and used widely. Emacs is a free, open-source, extensible, customizable text editor. It is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac, developed by GNU project and released under GNU GPL license. Development of the first Emacs began in the mid-1970s, and work on its direct descendent, GNU Emacs, continues actively as of 2017. Richard Stallman began work on GNU Emacs in 1984 to produce a free software alternative to the proprietary Gosling Emacs.
    Emacs has over 10,000 built-in commands and its user interface allows the user to combine these commands into macros to automate work. Additionally, implementations of Emacs typically feature a dialect of the Lisp programming language that provides a deep extension capability, allowing users and developers to write new commands and applications for the editor. Extensions have been written to manage email, files, outlines, and RSS feeds, as well as clones of ELIZA, Pong, Conway's Life, Snake and Tetris.

  • HHVM 3.22

    HHVM 3.22 is released! This release primarily contains bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places; see the installation instructions for more information.

  • HHVM 3.22 Brings More Performance Improvements, Bug Fixes

    HHVM 3.22 is now available as this alternative PHP implementation and what serves as the basis for Facebook's Hack programming language.

    While HHVM 3.22 supports PHP5/PHP7, keep in mind Facebook recently announced they are eventually abandoning their PHP focus in favor of focusing HHVM on their Hack language. HHVM 3.24 will be the last release focusing on PHP compatibility while support may still work beyond that for some time, but Hack is Facebook's focus.

  • Container Linux by CoreOS

    Container Linux by CoreOS, originally named CoreOS Linux, is an open source operating system (OS) that provides the functionality required to deploy and manage applications within containers. Based on the Linux kernel, Container Linux by CoreOS is designed for massive scale, with management features to ensure minimal operational overhead.

  • The Role of API Gateways in Microservice Architectures

    Despite their differences in nomenclature, newly emerging service meshes aren’t all that different that API Gateways, and the similarities between the two will continue to grow over time, so predicts Marco Palladino, Chief Technology Officer of API Gateway provider Mashape.

    The two technologies actually offer quite similar functionality, Palladino noted. API Gateways, such as Amazon Web Services‘ API Gateway or Mashape’s own open source Kong, have been primarily used over the last decade or so for mapping external traffic to internal resources, whereas the more recently developed service meshes — such as Lyft’s Envoy or Uber’s Catylist— have been primarily been on brokering internal resources in a microservices architecture.

Development: Blockchain for Good Hackathon, ASUS Tinker Board, React License, JavaScript, Pascal, Python

Filed under
Development
  • Blockchain for Good Hackathon, Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October

    The Blockchain for Good Hackathon takes place Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October. Full agenda can be found here.

  • ASUS Tinker Board Is An Interesting ARM SBC For About $60 USD

    Earlier this year ASUS announced the Tinker Board as their first step into the ARM single board computer world. Earlier this month I finally received a Tinker Board for testing and it has been quite interesting to say the least. The Tinker Board with its Rockchip SoC has been among the most competitive ARM SBCs we have tested to date in its price range and the form factor is compatible with the Raspberry Pi.

  • Configure Thunderbird to send patch friendly
  • Facebook to Relicense React Under MIT [Ed: as we hoped [1, 2]]

    Facebook has decided to change the React license from BSD+Patents to MIT to make it possible for companies to include React in Apache projects, and to avoid uncertain relationship with the open source community.

    Adam Wolff, an Engineering Director at Facebook, has announced that a number of projects - React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js – will soon start using the more standard MIT License instead of BSD+Patents. The reason provided is "because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons." While aware that the React’s BSD+Patents license has created "uncertainty" among users of the library, prompting some to select an alternative solution, Facebook does not "expect to win these teams back" but they still hope some will reconsider the issue. The change in license will become effective when React 16 will be released next week.

    Regarding other projects, Wolff said that "many of our popular projects will keep the BSD + Patents license for now", while they are "evaluating those projects' licenses too, but each project is different and alternative licensing options will depend on a variety of factors." It seems from this clause that Facebook plans to get rid of the BSD+Patents license entirely, but they need to figure out the best option for each project.

    [...]

    Facebook’s plan to switch to a standard license MIT, supported by Apache, completely solves this problem with React and several other projects. It remains to see what happens with the license of other Facebook projects, and how much this license issue has affected how React is perceived by the community.

  • To type or not to type: quantifying detectable bugs in JavaScript
  • Plug For PASCAL
  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition

10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

Filed under
Development
  • 10 Open Source Skills That Can Lead to Higher Pay

    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers.

    In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.

  • If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?

    For a growing number of people, data analysis is a central part of their job. Increased data availability, more powerful computing, and an emphasis on analytics-driven decision in business has made it a heyday for data science. According to a report from IBM, in 2015 there were 2.35 million openings for data analytics jobs in the US. It estimates that number will rise to 2.72 million by 2020.

    A significant share of people who crunch numbers for a living use Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet programs like Google Sheets. Others use proprietary statistical software like SAS, Stata, or SPSS that they often first learned in school.

  • std::bind

    In digging through the ASIO C++ library examples, I came across an actual use of std::bind. Its entry in cppreference seemed like buzzword salad, so I never previously had paid it any attention.

Java JDK 9 Finally Reaches General Availability

Filed under
Development

Java 9 (JDK 9) has finally reached general availability! Following setbacks, Java 9 is officially available as well as Java EE 8.

Read more

Programming: Programming Skills, Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0, DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community

Filed under
Development

     

  • The Four Layers of Programming Skills

    When learning how to code for the first time, there's a common misconception that learning how to code is primarily about learning the syntax of a programming language. That is, learning how the special symbols, keywords, and characters must be written in the right order for the language to run without errors.

    However, focusing only on knowledge of syntax is a bit like practicing to write a novel by only studying grammar and spelling. Grammar and spelling are needed to write a novel, but there are many other layers of skills that are needed in order to write an original, creative novel.

    [...]

    This is the layer that is most often focused on in the early learning phase. Syntax skills essentially means how to read and write a programming language using the rules for how different characters must be used for the code to actually work.

  • Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0

    For those making use of Beignet for Intel graphics OpenCL acceleration on Linux, it finally has added support for LLVM 5.0.

    Beignet doesn't tend to support new LLVM versions early but rather a bit notorious for their tardiness in supporting new LLVM releases. LLVM 5.0 has been out for two weeks, so Beignet Git has moved on to adding support for LLVM 5.

    There were Beignet changes to libocl and GBE for enabling the LLVM 5.0 support.

  • DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community, the Premier Open Source Toolkit to Simplify End-to-End Web Development Processes

IBM open sources WebSphere Liberty code

Filed under
Development
Server
OSS

Programming: OpenJ9, HHVM, and Good API Documentation

Filed under
Development
  • IBM open-sources a microservices-friendly Java app server

    A few weeks ago, Nginx released its multilanguage microservices-friendly app server, but without Java support at launch. Now IBM has a beta build of its own microservices-friendly app server for Java applications: the open source Open Liberty, which implements IBM’s version of Java EE and MicroProfile microservices implementation.

    Open Liberty will provide a runtime supporting Java microservices that can be quickly updated and moved among different cloud environments. When combined with the Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine, OpenLiberty will provide a full Java stack, IBM said. (OpenJ9 had been IBM’s J9 JVM, which it contributed to the Eclipse Foundation that now manages Java EE.)

  • The Future of HHVM

    Several months ago, PHP officially announced the end-of-life for PHP5.

    The HHVM team is happy about the direction PHP has taken with PHP7, and we’re proud of the role we’ve played in pushing the language and runtime to where they are today. Since the PHP community is finally saying goodbye to PHP5, we’ve decided to do so as well.

  • The Ten Essentials for Good API Documentation

Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Free software log (July and August 2017)

    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years.

    After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125

    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Smartphone Waste and Tizen News

15 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark"

​The New Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" launch with GNOME3 has brought a big change and got a lot of people excited to try it as soon as they can. If you don't know yet the new stuff in Ubuntu 17.10, read the article we published today. Read
more

Anarchy Linux Dispels Fear of Arch

Arch-Anywhere/Anarchy Linux is one of the nicest Arch-based distributions I have encountered. However, Anarchy Linux still requires familiarity with terminology and processes that usually are not needed to install Linux distros from a fully-functioning live session installation disk. Not having a demo mode to preview how the OS runs on your particular hardware can be a time-consuming setback. However, once you have Anarchy Linux up and running, it will give you a very pleasing computing experience. Much of what happens after installation depends on the desktop environment you selected. If you have a desktop preference or prefer one of the included window manager environments instead, you can forget about the sullied reputation that comes with Arch Linux distros. For many reasons, Anarchy Linux is a winning choice. Read more

Intel Graphics Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10

Given the Ubuntu 17.10 release this week and its massive desktop changes from GNOME Wayland to Mesa/kernel upgrades, we've been busy benchmarking this new Ubuntu OS release. Complementing the Radeon Ubuntu 17.04 vs. 17.10 gaming comparison are now some OpenGL/Vulkan benchmarks when using Intel Kabylake graphics hardware on Ubuntu 17.04, 17.10 with X.Org and Wayland, and the performance if upgrading against Linux/Mesa Git. Read more