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Development

Programming: Perl, C++, LLVM and More

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Development
  • New Software::LicenseMoreUtils Perl module

    Debian project has rather strict requirements regarding package license. One of these requirements is to provide a copyright file mentioning the license of the files included in a Debian package.

    Debian also recommends to provide this copyright information in a machine readable format that contain the whole text of the license(s) or a summary pointing to a pre-defined location on the file system (see this example).

    cme and Config::Model::Dpkg::Copyright helps in this task using Software::License module.

  • 01:C++ Boost libraries can increase productivity

    Writing code for every function in a software can be time consuming and expensive, so many C++ developers prefer to use libraries which contain modules for different applications to increase productivity. While there are already some libraries integrated with the standard C++ programming language, one of the most popular sources of C++ portable libraries is Boost, https://www.boost.org . These boost

  • LLVM 6.0.1 Released

    Tom Stellard at Red Hat has continued with his duties of serving as the LLVM point release manager and today formally issued the LLVM 6.0.1 update.

  • Does your project suffer from technical drift?

    Certainly, if the developer had known this would happen, he or she would not have chosen this implementation (I hope). For you Angularities, we are converting all our apps to use the reactive forms approach. More code, fewer HTML directives—a much better choice for testing and understanding the flow in the application.

  • Investigating CPython’s Optimisation Trickery for Lichen

Events: GUADEC and IBM's 'Call for Code'

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Development
GNOME
  • GUADEC 2018 Day 1

    At 8.30 i took off Thursday morning to start my journey to Almería. I took the plane to Madrid and had 1 hour to get hold of a taxi and reach a train taking me to Almería. There I was fortunate to meet Julian and Tobias who were hacking on Fractal and making mockups.

  • GUADEC 2018 Kicks Off In Almería, Spain

    GUADEC 2018, the annual GNOME developers' conference, has kicked off this morning in Almería, Spain.

    As usual, GUADEC 2018 features a range of interesting technical talks. This year's event runs from today (6 July) through Sunday followed by three days worth of hacking and birds-of-a-feather sessions.

  • The field guide to aiding in natural disasters and deploying life-saving code

    As an open-source and mobile developer, I’ve had the opportunity to work on some unique projects in places where both man-made and natural disasters have severely affected people and communities. During my time in Haiti working with organizations helping those impacted by the devastating 2010 earthquake, for example, I learned how to take on challenges to assist those in need and simultaneously cope with more adversity than the average development project would require.

  • Join Forces Against Natural Disasters with the Call for Code

    The Call for Code initiative aims to harness the collective power of the global open source developer community against the growing threat of natural disasters. According to IBM, “the goal is to develop technology solutions that significantly improve disaster preparedness, provide relief from devastation caused by fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and earthquakes, and benefit Call for Code’s charitable partners — the United Nations Human Rights Office and the American Red Cross.”

What Is the Best Way to Contribute to The Linux Kernel?

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Development
Linux

A person who isn’t much of a computer literate wouldn’t know that the kernel is a fundamental part of any OS. It is so far removed from the surface apps that the closest you could get to it from a typical app on your machine is configuring network protocols and/or installing driver software. As a matter of fact, only programmers typically deal with kernels directly.

To paint a perfect picture, the kernel is to a computer what an engine is to a car. You as what the best way to contribute to the Linux kernel is? I don’t know. I’m not an authority on kernels, but I sure do have some suggestions you may find useful.

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PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3 Released

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Development
Web
  • PHP 7.3.0 alpha 3 Released

    The PHP team is glad to announce the release of the third PHP 7.3.0 version, PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3. The rough outline of the PHP 7.3 release cycle is specified in the PHP Wiki.

    For source downloads of PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3 please visit the download page. Windows sources and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/qa/.

    Please carefully test this version and report any issues found in the bug reporting system.

  • PHP 7.3 Alpha 3 Released

    The third alpha of this year's PHP7 update, PHP 7.3, is now available for evaluation.

    PHP 7.3 has been crafting improved PHP garbage collection, WebP support within the image create from string function, and a variety of other features and improvements. PHP 7.3 is looking very good in early benchmarks.

    PHP 7.3 Alpha 3 introduces a lot of bug fixes from core PHP to various extensions, min_proto_version/max_proto_version options added to OpenSSL for maximum/minimum TLS version protocol values, and various other code improvements.

Python 3 at Facebook and Teaching Python to Kids

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Development
  • Python 3 at Facebook

    Python 3 adoption has clearly picked up over the last few years, though there is still a long way to go. Big Python-using companies tend to have a whole lot of Python 2.7 code running on their infrastructure and Facebook is no exception. But Jason Fried came to PyCon 2018 to describe what has happened at the company over the last four years or so—it has gone from using almost no Python 3 to it becoming the dominant version of Python in the company. He was instrumental in helping to make that happen and his talk [YouTube video] may provide other organizations with some ideas on how to tackle their migration.

    Fried started working at Facebook in 2011 and he quickly found that he needed to teach himself Python because it was much easier to get code reviewed if it was in Python. At some point later, he found that he was the driving force behind Python 3 adoption at Facebook. He never had a plan to do that, it just came about as he worked with Python more and more.

  • Teaching Python to kids

    The combination of an "unsuspecting library employee" and a bunch of bored children has created a popular program using the Raspberry Pi and other tools to teach coding to kids. Qumisha Goss is a librarian at the Parkman branch of the Detroit Public Library; she started the "Parkman Coders" program and came to PyCon 2018 in Cleveland, Ohio to tell the assembled Pythonistas all about it. She also had some thoughts on ways to make the Python community a more diverse place, along with some concerns for her students that are much bigger than the diversity topic.

Programming: Anytime, PHP and Broken Code

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Development
  • anytime 0.3.1

    A new minor release of the anytime package is now on CRAN. This is the twelveth release, and the first in a little over a year as the package has stabilized.

    anytime is a very focused package aiming to do just one thing really well: to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, … format to either POSIXct or Date objects – and to do so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page, or the GitHub README.md for a few examples.

  • [Older] Is php dead? Chill, PHP Is Not Going Anywhere
  • How I stopped merging broken code

    I love pull requests to merge code. I review them, I send them, I merge them. The fact that you can plug them into a continuous integration system is great and makes sure that you don't merge code that will break your software. I usually have Travis-CI setup and running my unit tests and code style check.

Hacker Boards

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Development
Linux
Hardware
  • Renegade Elite Mini PC Board Counters Raspberry Pi 3 With 4K Streaming And Hexa-Core CPU

    A new device called the Renegade Elite (ROC-RK3399-PC) has surfaced as a competitor to the Raspberry Pi 3 that is packing in much higher specifications and can stream 4K video. The Renegade Elite is made by Libre Computer and will soon surface for pre-order on Indiegogo.

  • Raspberry Pi's 'app store' lands with new Raspbian OS update

    The latest version of Raspbian, the Raspberry Pi's official OS, introduces a new set-up wizard to help beginners easily get over the first few hurdles after buying one of the $35 developer boards.

    The new version of Raspbian also introduces an equivalent of the App Store that recommends software that users can choose to install, alongside apps already bundled with Raspbian.

Programming: Go, CRAN, PHP

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Development
  • Another golang port, this time a toy virtual machine.

    I don't understand why my toy virtual machine has as much interest as it does. It is a simple project that compiles "assembly language" into a series of bytecodes, and then allows them to be executed.

    Since I recently started messing around with interpreters more generally I figured I should revisit it. Initially I rewrote the part that interprets the bytecodes in golang, which was simple, but now I've rewritten the compiler too.

    Much like the previous work with interpreters this uses a lexer and an evaluator to handle things properly - in the original implementation the compiler used a series of regular expressions to parse the input files. Oops.

  • nanotime 0.2.1

    A new minor version of the nanotime package for working with nanosecond timestamps just arrived on CRAN.

  • PHP extensions status with upcoming PHP 7.3

Deep Learning with Open Source Python Software

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Development

Let’s clear up one potential source of confusion at the outset. What’s the difference between Machine Learning and Deep Learning? The two terms mean different things.

In essence, Machine Learning is the practice of using algorithms to parse data, learn insights from that data, and then make a determination or prediction. The machine is ‘trained’ using huge amounts of data.

Deep Learning is a subset of Machine Learning that uses multi-layers artificial neural networks to deliver state-of-the-art accuracy in tasks such as object detection, speech recognition, language translation and others. Think of Machine Learning as cutting-edge, and Deep Learning as the cutting-edge of the cutting-edge.

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Programming: LLVM, GCC, RcppArmadillo

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Development
  • LLVM Gets ARMv8.4 Enablement, GCC Gets Cortex-A76 Support

    It's been another busy week in compiler land for ARM.

    First up, the GCC compiler now officially supports the Cortex-A76. The A76 is the new Cortex processor announced back in May for yielding much better performance and efficiency, especially for AI and machine learning.

  • Compiler fuzzing, part 1

    Much has been written about fuzzing compilers already, but there is not a lot that I could find about fuzzing compilers using more modern fuzzing techniques where coverage information is fed back into the fuzzer to find more bugs.

  • GCC Picks Up Meaningful Bash Completion Support To Help With Compiler Options

    One of the advantages of the LLVM Clang compiler has been better integration with Bash completion support, but now the GCC compiler supports a --completion argument for feeding into the Bash completion script with better matching of supported options/values when typing into a supported terminal.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.8.600.0.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release 0.8.600.0.0, based on the new Armadillo release 8.600.0 from this week, just arrived on CRAN.

    It follows our (and Conrad’s) bi-monthly release schedule. We have made interim and release candidate versions available via the GitHub repo (and as usual thoroughly tested them) but this is the real release cycle. A matching Debian release will be prepared in due course.

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More in Tux Machines

How to enable developer mode on a Chrome OS tablet (and install Linux using Crouton)

Google’s Chrome OS is designed to be a relatively secure, simple operating system that’s easy to use and hard to mess up. But you can run stable channel, beta channel, or dev channel software on any Chromebook depending on whether you want the safest experience or buggy, bleeding-edge features. There’s also an option called Developer Mode, which is different from the dev channel. It allows you to access files and settings that are normally protected and use a command shell to explore the system. It’s designed for developers and advanced users only, since it increases the chances that you’ll break your Chromebook. But enabling Developer Mode is also a prerequisite for using one my favorite Chrome OS hacks: a tool called Crouton that allows you to install Ubuntu or another GNU/Linux distribution and run it alongside Chrome OS. Read more

Red Hat News and Press

Belated Thoughts on van Rossum’s Departure

  • Is BDFL a death sentence?
    A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away. Below is a portion of his message, although the entire email is not terribly long and worth taking the time to read if you’re interested in the circumstances leading to van Rossum’s departure.
  • Thoughts on Guido retiring as BDFL of Python
    I've been programming in Python for almost 20 years on a myriad of open source projects, tools for personal use, and work. I helped out with several PyCon US conferences and attended several others. I met a lot of amazing people who have influenced me as a person and as a programmer. I started PyVideo in March 2012. At a PyCon US after that (maybe 2015?), I found myself in an elevator with Guido and somehow we got to talking about PyVideo and he asked point-blank, "Why work on that?" I tried to explain what I was trying to do with it: create an index of conference videos across video sites, improve the meta-data, transcriptions, subtitles, feeds, etc. I remember he patiently listened to me and then said something along the lines of how it was a good thing to work on. I really appreciated that moment of validation. I think about it periodically. It was one of the reasons Sheila and I worked hard to transition PyVideo to a new group after we were burned out.

Catfish 1.4.6 Released

  • Catfish 1.4.6 Released, Now an Xfce Project
    It’s a great day for fans of the fast and powerful Catfish search utility. With the 1.4.6 release, Catfish now officially joins the Xfce family. Additionally, there’s been some nice improvements to the thumbnailer and a large number of bugs have been squashed.
  • Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project
    The Catfish search utility now officially lives under the Xfce umbrella. Catfish is a GTK3-based and Python 3.x written program for searching for files on the system. Catfish has long been common to Xfce desktop systems and complementary to the Thunar file manager. The Catfish 1.4.6 release was made this weekend and with this version has now officially become part of the Xfce project.