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Development

Programming: Python, DevSecOps Skills Gap, Go Programming, Java EE, GNU Tools Cauldron and GnuCOBOL

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Development
GNU
  • Improving security through data analysis and visualizations

        

    My last tip is that in recent years, there have been a lot of new tools that make designing nice visualizations much easier. In fact, many really prevent you from creating the disasters that you’d find here: https://www.reddit.com/r/dataisugly/. If you are a Python user, you really should take a look at Seaborn, YellowBrick, and Altair as they are all really impressive libraries.

  • The DevSecOps Skills Gap
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  • How I learned Go Programming

    Go is a relatively new programming language, and nothing makes a developer go crazier than a new programming language, haha! As many new tech inventions, Go was created as an experiment. The goal of its creators was to come up with a language that would resolve bad practices of others while keeping the good things. It was first released in March 2012. Since then Go has attracted many developers from all fields and disciplines.

  • Must go faster, must go faster! Oracle lobs Java EE into GitHub, vows rapid Java SE releases

    Oracle plans to accelerate the pace of Java SE releases – and has moved Java EE's code repository to GitHub in keeping with its avowed desire to step back from managing the beast.

    Java SE has been on a two-year release cycle. That's no longer fast enough, according to Mark Reinhold, chief architect of Oracle’s Java platform group.

    Java competes with other platforms that get updated more often, he explained.

  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Kicks Off Tomorrow

    The annual GNU Tools Cauldron conference focused around the GNU compiler toolchain will kickoff tomorrow, 8 September, in Prague.

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 Released To Let COBOL Code Live On As C

    For those of you still maintaining COBOL code-bases, GnuCOBOL 2.2 is now available as what was formerly OpenCOBOL and also the project's first stable release in nearly one decade.

    GnuCOBOL has been living under the GNU/FSF umbrella for a few years while today's GnuCOBOL 2.2 release is the first stable release since OpenCOBOL 1.1 back in 2009. (Since then was the GnuCOBOL 1.1 release, but just for renaming the project.)

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 released

    Version 2.2 of the GNU COBOL compiler is out. Changes include a relicensing to GPLv3, a set of new intrinsic functions, a direct call interface for C functions, and more.

GNOME: GNOME Mutter, GNOME 3.26, and Support more than one Build System (Meson and Autotools)

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 Adds Built-In Screencast / Remote Desktop Capabilities

    GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 has been released and it incorporates some interesting changes for the end of the GNOME 3.26 development cycle.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Up to RC State, Launches on September 13

    GNOME Project's Javier Jardón announced a few moments ago that the GNOME 3.25.92 milestone of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now available for public testing, marking the end of the development cycle.

    GNOME 3.26 has been in development since early April, and it's now up to RC (Release Candidate) state, which means that the development cycle is over and the team will begin preparations for the final release of the highly anticipated desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Support more than one Build System

    I’ve tried to add Meson build system to MyHTML, but fail. They prefer the one is used today. That’s OK.

    Support two build systems increase burden on project maintenance, this is the main reason to reject my pull request and is OK. As for GXml, we have both Autotools and Meson. I’m trying to keep both in sync, as soon as a new file is added, but you may forget one or the other.

    While I use GXml on my Windows programs, I need to make sure it will work properly out of the box, like Autotools does, before to remove the later.

Development Tools: Java IDEs, Qt Creator, C++17

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Development
  • What is your favorite open source Java IDE?

    That developers have strong opinions about the tools they use is no secret, and perhaps some of the strongest opinions come out around integrated development environments.

    When we asked our community what their favorite Python IDE is, more than 10,000 of you responded. Now, it's time for Java developers to get their turn.

  • Qt Creator 4.4 Open-Source IDE Released with C++ and CMake Improvements, More

    The Qt Company's Eike Ziller announced the release of the Qt Creator 4.4.0 free and open-source IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    More than two months in the making, Qt Creator 4.4 introduces new inline annotations in the build-in editor, which could come in handy if you're using Clang code model or bookmarks, along with the ability for the editor to display Clang errors, bookmarks errors, as well as other warnings at the end of the corresponding text line. The feature can be enabled under Options -> Text Editor -> Display.

  • C++17 Formally Approved, Just Waiting On ISO Publication

    C++17 (formerly C++1z) is ready for its debut. C++17 has been formally approved by its committee and is just waiting on ISO publishing.

    Back in March we reported on "C++17 being done" while work on C++20 is already underway. C++17 hasn't changed since while the last major ballot has now passed with 100% approval and they are now ready to officially publish this latest C++ standard. They just need to make a few editorial comments to the standard for spelling/formatting and then send the firmed up document to the ISO for publishing.

Programming: Java EE, "The Node.js world is imploding" and 'DevOps' Success

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Development
  • Java EE Is Now Available Via GitHub

    Oracle has been looking to divest somewhat from Java and while OpenJDK has been available for the past decade as open-source, Oracle up to now has kept its hands relatively tight around Java EE. But now it looks like all of Java EE is up on GitHub, though as of writing I have yet to find any official announcement from Oracle.

  • The Node.js world is imploding

    A close-knit tech community has fallen into disarray over a debate that started around a Code of Conduct and quickly spiraled into a referendum on diversity initiatives.

    Ashley Williams, an outspoken advocate for diversity in tech and a member of the Node Foundation Board of Directors, the volunteer leadership organization for the popular open source Node.js technology, is being accused of “hateful speech,” “promoting sex and race based prejudice and stereotypes,” and “promoting violence (homicide) towards men,” according to an anonymous Reddit post that rose to the top of the Node subreddit one week ago.

    Williams, her anonymous critics say, is guilty of the very crime she has railed against: making the community, which is made up of more than 1,500 contributors, less inclusive in ways that violate the community’s code of conduct. Her anonymous critic cited her tweets as evidence, including the time someone tweeted a photo of a contest at the security convention DEF CON with the sarcastic caption: “Hacker Jeopardy. Category is ‘Dicks’. Men play. Women give them beers. Why aren't there more women in security?" and Williams quote-tweeted them with the phrase “kill all men.” This was cited as “Promoting violence (homicide) towards men.”

  • The Forgotten Secret to DevOps Success: Measurement

FOSS Development: Qbs 1.9, Stack Overflow, and GPL Compliance

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Development
  • Qbs 1.9 released

    Qbs (pronounced “Cubes”) is The Qt Company’s latest build tool, which is planned to be the replacement for qmake in the Qt build system. In addition to its use within Qt, for our customers Qbs will also provide faster build times coupled with a rich feature set in order to reduce build engineering complexity and decrease time to market.

  • Qbs 1.9 Released, Still Advancing To Be The Qt6 Build System

    Besides releasing Qt Creator 4.4 today, The Qt Company also announced the release of Qbs 1.9, the Qt Build System.

  • Cast survey: whatever happened to software accountability?

    Cast this year says it has found that 56% of respondents feel the most important languages to master in the next five years are Java and JavaScript, followed by C++ (38%), Python (35%) and SQL (30%).

    Also as a comment on the open source sphere, Stack Overflow and GitHub are not the preferred destinations for learning.

  • Allegation of Open Source Non-Compliance Leads to Anti-Competitive Practice Lawsuit

    Many of today’s hottest new enterprise technologies – IoT, Healthcare, AI - are centered on open-source technology. The free and open source software movement has moved well out of grassroots into mainstream – and license compliance issues and enforcement have followed.

    Until recently, most instances of open source noncompliance were led by nonprofit entities such as Software Freedom Conservancy, gpl-violations.org or the individual project owners. Compliance disputes were typically resolved without outside government legal processes. However, as open source becomes more widely used, disputes involving private parties have increased.

OSS: OpenProject in OSI, FOSS Events, and Women in Technology/Computing

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Development
OSS
  • OpenProject Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced that the OpenProject Foundation has joined the global non-profit as an Affiliate Member. OpenProject joins a who's who of global open source projects and foundations in support of software freedom, including Drupal Association, Eclipse Foundation, Linux Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, Wordpress Foundation, Wikimedia, and many more. The OSI Affiliate Member Program allows any non-profit community, organization or institution—unequivocally independent groups with a clear commitment to open source—to join the OSI in support of its mission to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community.

  • Randa Approaches

    Later this week, I’m leaving for Zurich, and from there I’ll take the train up to Randa (up, in the sense that I live at sea level, and Randa is the length of one million micro-SD cards laid end-to-end higher).

    In Randa, I’ll be working as a KDE developer, and as a Calamares developer, and learning about accessibility tooling. There’s about 60 hacking hours in that week. I’ll also be working as the cook, for one day. There’s about 12 cooking hours in a day, since feeding 30 people takes a lot of vegetable-chopping, bread-slicing, and dish-washing.

  • FOSScamp Syros 2017 – day 2

    The morning stated by taking the bus to Kini beach. After some to enjoy the water (which were still cold in the morning), we sat for talking about the local Debian community and how can we help it grow. The main topic was localization (l10n), but we soon started to check other options. I reminded them that l10n isn’t only translation and we also talked about dictionaries for spell checking, fonts and local software which might be relevant (e.g. hdate for the Jewish/Hebrew calendar or Jcal for the Jalali calendar). For example it seems that regular Latin fonts are missing two Albanian characters.

    We also talked about how to use Open Labs to better work together with two hats – member of the local FOSS community and also as members of various open source projects (not forgetting open content / data ones projects as well). So people can cooperate both on the local level, the international level or to mix (using the other’s project international resources). In short: connections, connections, connections.

  • GnuPG Financial Results for 2016
  • ‘Women Were in Fact Pioneers in Computing Work’

    When a white male Google employee was fired after the release of a memo in which he complained about efforts to increase gender or racial diversity because employment gaps in tech may be due in part to “biological differences” which are “universal across human culture”—woman like feelings more than ideas, that sort of thing—this is not indication that, as USA Today hyperventilated, “the hot button issue of gender bias in the workplace has just gone thermonuclear.” It did provide occasion for the airing of some old ideas involving sexism and scientism, presented as somehow new, because technology.

  • a new interview question

    Obviously if you discover a person that thinks that gender imbalance is just the way it is and that nothing can or should be done about it, or that women don't program well, or the like, then that's a great result: clear no-hire. This person is likely to make life unpleasant for their female colleagues, and your company just avoided the problem. High fives, interview team!

Programming: Qt Creator 4.4, Ecere SDK, LLVM Clang, Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer, antergos 17.9 ISO and More

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Development
  • Qt Creator 4.4.0 released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.4.0!

  • Qt Creator 4.4 Released With New Inline Warning/Errors, CMake Improvements

    The Qt Company has announced the immediate availability of the Qt Creator 4.4 integrated development environment focused on Qt/C++ development.

    Qt Creator 4.4 has new inline annotations when in the Clang code model, some C++ highlighting improvements, improvements when using the CMake build system in its recent server-mode, removal of Windows CE support, and a variety of other improvements to this cross-platform IDE.

  • Ecere SDK: A cross-platform toolkit for GUIs and graphics

    In the summer of 1997, I was an avid gamer of the golden classics of the real-time strategy (RTS) and immersive 3D/sandbox role-playing games that defined those genres. After wasting many hours gaming, I wanted to do something more constructive. I had dreams of building my own video games.

    The previous year, I had created a basic textured-mapping, software-rendering 3D engine for a tutorial series called the 3D Coding BlackHole. I was working on developing a clone of a popular RTS game—as a learning experience and a stepping stone to building a new game with potential contributors.

  • More Benchmarks Of AMD's Threadripper With LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN

    With AMD a few days ago having landed an updated scheduler model for Zen CPUs within LLVM, I ran some fresh compiler benchmarks to see how the performance compares.

    This weekend I ran tests of LLVM Clang 4.0, Clang 5.0, and Clang 6.0 SVN after the landing of the recent znver1 scheduler model update. Just some quick tests from the AMD Threadripper 1950X Linux system while a more formal compiler comparison is in the works.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer Enters Alpha with Linux 4.12 Support

    Work on the next major version of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system is ongoing since early July, a couple of weeks after the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series arrived, and it now looks like it's already in Alpha stages of development.

  • ISO Refresh: antergos 17.9
  • Intel Preparing Sub-Group Support For Their ANV Vulkan Driver
  • RadeonSI Lands Primitive Binning Support For Vega

    With a goal of increasing performance, AMD developers have added support for primitive binning to the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.

Programming: Linux Development, Vulkan 1.0.60, Vala 0.38 and More

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Development

Developers' News: AMDGPU, Neon, GNOME Builder, Firefox 57, Coreutils 8.28, and More

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Development
  • Work-In-Progress Porting Of GCN 1.0/1.1 UVD To AMDGPU DRM Driver

    With the experimental AMDGPU DRM driver's support for GCN 1.0 "Southern Islands" and GCN 1.1 "Sea Islands" graphics processors as an alternative to the default Radeon DRM driver, one of the disadvantages of that experimental kernel driver is losing out on UVD video decoding. But a port is in the works.

  • Great Web Browsing Coming Back to KDE with Falkon, New Packaging Formats Coming to KDE with Snap

    Today is a good day filled with possibility and potential. The browser formerly known as QupZilla has gained a better name Falkon and a better home, KDE. This bring quality web browsing back to native KDE software for the first time in some years. It’s a pleasingly slick experience using QtWebEngine and integrating with all the parts of Plasma you’d expect.

    At the same time we at KDE neon are moving to new packaging format Snaps, a container format which can be used on many Linux distros. Falkon is now built by KDE neon CI and is in the edge channel of the Snap archive.

  • Builder 3.26 Sightings

    We’re getting close to 3.26 and a number of features have landed. Let’s take a quick screenshot tour to see what you’re likely to see in 3.26.

  • All Hands On Deck – How you can use your skills to contribute to Firefox 57 success

    If you’ve been following Firefox development over the last year, you probably know that we’re hard at work on a major refactor of the browser, codenamed Quantum.

    It’s been a very exciting and challenging time with hundreds of engineers bringing to life new concepts and incorporating them into our engine – Gecko. Those refactors, which will culminate in the release of Firefox 57, touch the very foundation of our engine and require massive changes to it.

  • coreutils-8.28 released [stable]

    This is to announce coreutils-8.28, a stable release.
    See the NEWS below for more details.

    Thanks to everyone who has contributed!

  • Coreutils 8.28 Released With Many Fixes, Few New Features

    Coreutils 8.28 is now available as the collection of core components found on GNU/Linux systems from cp, mv, df, tail, and many other common commands to command-line users.

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  • Return to old school programming

    When my brother and I were growing up, our parents brought home an Apple II personal computer. Actually ours was one of the first Apple "clones," a Franklin ACE 1000, but it ran all of the original Apple software. And more importantly, you could write your own programs with the included AppleSoft BASIC.

    My brother and I cracked open the computer guide that came with it, and slowly taught ourselves how to write programs in BASIC. My first attempts were fairly straightforward math quizzes and other simple programs. But as I gained more experience in BASIC, I was able to harness high resolution graphics mode and do all kinds of nifty things.

  • cron.weekly issue #96: LogDevice, qmail, redis, Linus, HAProxy, libraries, concert, restic & more

    There’s some old-skool Linux news in this one with qmail & some Apple history, even more open source venture rounds & some practical guides for monitoring & securing containers. Should keep you occupied for at least a morning coffee.

Debian: Indexing Debian's buildinfo, Latest Development Reports (LTS)

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Development
Debian
  • Indexing Debian's buildinfo

    Debian is currently collecting buildinfo but they are not very conveniently searchable. Eventually Chris Lamb's buildinfo.debian.net may solve this problem, but in the mean time, I decided to see how practical indexing the full set of buildinfo files is with sqlite.

  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

  • F/LOSS activity, August 2017
  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

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More in Tux Machines

LXQt 0.12.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Support for HiDPI Displays

The developers of the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) were proud to announce today the release and immediate availability for download of the LXQt 0.12.0 desktop environment. Read more Also: LXQt 0.12 released With Better HiDPI Support, More Robust

GNOME 3.27.1 RELEASED

GNOME 3.25.1, the first unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See below. If you want to compile GNOME 3.27.1 by yourself, you can use the JHBuild modulesets available here: Read more Also: GNOME 3.27.1 Released

today's leftovers

  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux
    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.
  • Chromium 62 ready for download
    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating. When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.
  • Playing with the pine64
     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana
    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”
  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat
     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide
     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws
     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's howtos