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Development

Programming: pinp, GNSS, JavaScript, Security Updates

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Development
  • pinp 0.0.3: More docs, more features

    Our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignette received it second update. Now at version 0.0.3, it arrived on CRAN on Saturday with minimal fuzz as an 'CRAN-pretest-publish' transition.

  • Google lets Android devs see nanosecond-level GNSS data

    Created for phone designers, The Chocolate Factory has decided the raw GNSS data is also valuable to researchers, writing that the data “allows you to see the behavior of the GNSS receiver in great detail, including receiver clock offset and drift to the order of 1 nanosecond and 1 ppb [part per billion – El Reg] and measurement errors on a satellite-by-satellite basis.

  • ES8, the Javascript standard of 2017

    Surely you will know that since 2015 it was agreed to update the Javascript standard every year in order to keep JS up to date in a smooth way. The changes of last year were very decaffeinated, but this year we have some juicier news.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

Programming: uClibc, GCC, Fresh

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Development
  • uClibc Is Still Around As A Lightweight C Standard Library

    The uClibc project is still advancing as a lightweight, performant C standard library even while glibc has been making performance advancements and other improvements as well.

    Alexey Brodkin of Synopsys spoke at this week's Embedded Linux Conference Europe about how uClibc is still relevant today and "makes sense" for organizations like Synopsys.

  • GCC Prepares For C17 Language Support

    Not to be confused with C++17 that brings many notable additions and improvements, C17 is also coming soon as an update to the C programming language.

    The C17 programming language update is just a "bug fix version" to the C11 standard. C17 will soon go to ballot for voting and still might end up being known as C18, but for now the GNU Compiler Collection is getting prepped with patches as C17.

  • News: The new released Fresh IDE .

    The reputable IDE for FASM named Fresh comes on 29.10.2017 06:47:22 with new news.

Programming: Android 8.1 Developer, Z Garbage Collector, GNU C Library

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Development
  • Android 8.1 Developer Preview hands-on: Everything new in Google’s latest update

    Google gave us 64 days to get used to Android 8.0 Oreo being the latest version of Android. While only one third-party phone has upgraded to the latest version, Google is already dropping a developer preview for the next version of Android on the world. Two days ago it released the Android 8.1 Developer Preview, and after a solid day of trying to flash it, totally bricking a Pixel 2, and later having Google pull the update files because they didn't work, we're here to report what Android 8.1 is actually like.

    Like most of the .1 releases these days, it's full of some minor, but important, updates that probably just weren't ready in time for Android 8.0.

  • ZGC large-heap Java garbage collector may go open source

    An Oracle-developed, low-latency Java garbage collector geared to large heaps could move to the open source community, if a proposal to do so gets community approval. Votes are due by November 8.

    Called the Z Garbage Collector (ZGC), the project is designed to support multiterabyte heaps, have pause times not exceeding 10 milliseconds, and offer no more than a 15 percent application reduction throughput compared to the G1 garbage collector.

  • Point releases for the GNU C Library

    The GNU C Library (glibc) project produces regular releases on an approximately six-month cadence. The current release is 2.26 from early August; the 2.27 release is expected at the beginning of February 2018. Unlike many other projects, though, glibc does not normally create point releases for important fixes between the major releases. The last point release from glibc was 2.14.1, which came out in 2011. A discussion on the need for a 2.26 point release led to questions about whether such releases have a useful place in the current software-development environment.

    The glibc 2.26 release is generally only found in relatively fast-moving distributions at this point. For most users, 2.26 has been without problems, but that is not true for everybody. There have been a few significant regressions in this release that have required fixes; one of those was seen as important enough that the question of creating a 2.26.1 point release was raised. Romain Naour subsequently brought that discussion to the libc-alpha mailing list. Having a point release containing important fixes would be helpful to downstream distributors that want to incorporate those fixes, he said.

Programming: TLS, Systers, RockScript, London Perl Workshop

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Development
  • Mauritian code-cutters to help deliver TLS 1.3

    When IETF 100's hackathon kicks off in Singapore, one of the groups hoping to make waves will come from Mauritius.

    Their aim, Logan Velvindron of hackers.mu told Vulture South, is twofold: to make serious contributions to the development of the as-yet-immature TLS 1.3, and along the way, break Mauritius out of its public image as a tourist destination with nothing to contribute to today's IT.

  • Scout out code problems with SonarQube

    More and more organizations are implementing DevOps to make it faster to get quality code into the production environment after passing through the intermediate development and testing environments. Although things such as version control, continuous integration and deployment, and automated testing all fall under the scope of DevOps, one critical question remains: How can an organization quantify code quality, not just deployment speed?

  • Systers: Helping women find their potential in code

    Systers is the world's largest email community of women in technical computing roles, with more than 7,500 members from more than 65 countries. Systers was founded in 1987 by Anita Borg as the first online community for women in computing, and it hosts 23 different affinity groups where women technologists can connect with and offer support to members of their self-identified cultures.

  • RockScript: An Open Source Scripting Language and Engine for Microservice Orchestration

    Tom Baeyens has released a preview of RockScript, an open source scripting language and engine for integrating and orchestrating microservices in the style of Event-Driven Architecture (EDA). RockScript uses a language that looks much like JavaScript, which when executed by the accompanying engine allows the coordination of transactional activities within microservice systems in a similar fashion to Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and Business Process Modelling (BPM).

  • London Perl Workshop

     

     
        WHEN: 25th November 2017 at 9:00AM
        WHERE: 115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW (map)
     

  • How to rethink project management for DevOps

Events: Chrome Dev Summit, GSoC Mentor Summit, Google Code-in, Samsung's 'Open Source Conference’, Raleigh's ATO

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Development
OSS
  • Chrome Dev Summit 2017

    I attended the 5th Chrome Dev Summit this week. The talks were all recorded and are available via the schedule (the keynote and leadership panel on day 1 are perhaps of broadest interest and highest bang-for-buck viewing value). It was a high quality, well-produced event with an intimate feel – I was very surprised when Robert Nyman told me it was over 700 people! I appreciated the good vegetarian food options and noticed and was very impressed by the much-better-than-typical-tech-conferences gender representation and code of conduct visibility.

  • The 2017 GSoC Mentor Summit

    I am wrapping up the ideas after the Google mentor summit 2017. In spite of having mentored my first GSoC student in 2008, this is the first time I ever attended this summit. There were ~300 mentors representative of many different open source communities. A triple-concentrate of all the main open projects in a not-too-noisy environment (unlike e.g. FOSDEM) – all in all, it has been a very pleasant experience!

  • Google Code-in 2017 open source mentor organizations revealed, including Ubuntu!

    Google does a great job supporting the open source community, which is appropriate, as the company leverages the code too. The search giant gives back to the community through programs such as "Google Code-in." If you aren't familiar, it is an educational contest which teaches children about open source by having them working on an actual established project. Today, the Android-maker reveals the mentors that will be participating in Google Code-in 2017.

  • Samsung Electronics Kicks Off ‘2017 Open Source Conference’

    Samsung Electronics will hold 'Samsung OpenSource Conference' at Samsung Electronics Seoul R & D campus in Ueon-dong, Seoul from October 25 to 26.

    The Samsung Open Source Conference, which has been held every year since 2014, is the largest open source conference in Korea with over 1,000 developers participating in the program every year.

  • Is Raleigh the East Coast's Silicon Valley?

    They are also awed by the conference itself. This year well over 3,000 people shelled out somewhere around a couple of hundred bucks each to attend the two-day event, which took place earlier this week and utilized more than 20 meeting rooms at the Raleigh Convention Center to house over 200 sessions.

Programming: Comments, SciPy 1.0, and Android 8.1 O Developer Preview

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Development
  • How much do you comment your source code?

    While it may be true that the best code is self-documenting, even the clearest written source code requires adequate documentation in order to be quickly parsed and understood by human readers.

  • SciPy 1.0 released

    The SciPy project has announced the release of SciPy 1.0. The "Python-based ecosystem of open-source software for mathematics, science, and engineering" has been around for 16 years since version 0.1 and, in reality, the 1.0 designation is overdue. "Some key project goals, both technical (e.g. Windows wheels and continuous integration) and organisational (a governance structure, code of conduct and a roadmap), have been achieved recently. Many of us are a bit perfectionist, and therefore are reluctant to call something '1.0' because it may imply that it's 'finished' or 'we are 100% happy with it'. This is normal for many open source projects, however that doesn't make it right. We acknowledge to ourselves that it's not perfect, and there are some dusty corners left (that will probably always be the case). Despite that, SciPy is extremely useful to its users, on average has high quality code and documentation, and gives the stability and backwards compatibility guarantees that a 1.0 label imply." Beyond the Windows wheels (a binary distribution format) mentioned above, there are some other new features in the release: continuous-integration coverage for macOS and Windows, a set of new ordinary differential equation solvers and a unified interface to them, two new trust region optimizers and a new linear programming method, many new BLAS and LAPACK functions were wrapped, and more.

  • Google launches the Android 8.1 Developer Preview
  • Android 8.1 O Developer Preview And Android Studio 3 With Kotlin Support Released: Download Here

Programming: Eclipse, Java, Android Studio and More

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Development
  • Eclipse Foundation Prepares to Open Source Java EE as EE4J

    Milinkovich also noted it will take time to get all this accomplished and interaction with the Java community still needs to be defined. Eclipse has created the ee4j-community mailing list and developers are encouraged to provide feedback and to contribute.

  • Android Studio 3.0 Released With Kotlin Support, Java 8 Features

    Google today has pushed out Android Studio 3.0 as the latest stable release of this integrated development environment for their mobile operating system.

  • Databricks Delta, SciPy 1.0, and Neo4j’s Native Graph Platform
  • 4 steps to solving any software problem

    These are the steps I take to solve problems when coding, and the ones I try to impart to students and junior developers when I'm helping them with an issue. I'd like to see more coding education programs—whether in academic computer science, bootcamps, or self-paced tutorials—provide their own instructions on this process. The exact process will depend on the person, the organization, and the work they're doing—but knowing how to solve problems is a foundational skill to being a programmer. If you work with students or less experienced developers, see what you can do to help them develop this skill.

PredictionIO and Apache Software Foundation

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Development
OSS
  • PredictionIO, open-source software for building machine learning apps, gets Apache top-level status

    The Apache Software Foundation said today that it’s designating open-source machine learning software first developed by Salesforce.com Inc. as its latest top-level project.

  • Open-Source ML Server Gets Apache Promotion

    The pace of machine learning technology development got another boost this week with the announcement that an open source platform donated last year by Salesforce has been promoted by the Apache Foundation.

    Apache PredictionIO, designated a “top-level” project on Tuesday (Oct. 24), aims to democratize machine learning by giving developers a full stack for creating intelligent applications that could be deployed in production “without having to cobble together underlying technologies,” said Simon Chan, founder of Prediction IO who now services as senior director for Salesforce’s AI initiative called Einstein.

GTK+ 3.92

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Development
GNOME
  • GTK4's Vulkan Renderer Is Close To Complete

    Red Hat's Matthias Clasen has written a blog post concerning the changes found in the big GTK+ 3.92 development release that is pushing towards the GTK4 tool-kit release.

  • GTK+ 3.92

    Yesterday, we released GTK+ 3.92.1, 重庆市. Since it has been a while since the last 3.91 release, here is a brief look at the major changes.

    This release is another milestone on our way towards GTK+ 4. And while a lot still needs to be done, this release allows a first glimpse at some of the things we hope to achieve in GTK+ 4.

Intel Linux and GCC Work

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Development
GNU
Linux
  • Intel Begins Landing GFNI Support In GCC 8

    Intel compiler engineers have begun landing "GFNI" support within the GNU Compiler Collection as one of the new ISA extensions not expected until the Icelake processor debut.

  • Control-Flow Enforcement Technology Begins To Land In GCC 8

    Intel Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) support has begun landing within the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) for this code safety feature.

    Patches have been in the works for several months while now the start of the patches are being merged to mainline. Coincidentally, at the same time Intel is also landing their GFNI instruction patches in GCC as well.

  • Intel Continues Landing New i915 DRM Features For Linux 4.15

    Jani Nikula has sent in another drm-intel-next update for David Airlie's DRM-Next tree. They continue prepping more updates to their Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) for targeting the upcoming Linux 4.15 cycle.

    There have already been several Intel "i915" DRM driver updates queued in DRM-Next for this new kernel version. Past pulls have included marking Coffeelake graphics as stable, continued Cannonlake "Gen 10" graphics enablement, various display improvements, and quite a lot of other low-level code improvements.

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Linux Mint Releases Last KDE Edition "Sylvia"

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today's leftovers

  • Schaller On Linux In 2018: Rust Rules, Apple Declines, Linux Graphics Compete
    Christian Schaller who has long been involved in GNOME/Fedora development while serving as a senior software engineering manager at Red Hat and formerly with Collabora has some bold predictions about 2018 for open-source software.
  • Fedora Classroom Session: Fedora QA 102
    Fedora Classroom sessions continue next week with a session on Fedora QA. The general schedule for sessions appears on the wiki. You can also find resources and recordings from previous sessions there. Here are details about this week’s session on Wednesday, December 22 at 16:00 UTC. That link allows you to convert the time to your timezone.
  • Cura, the nice 3D print slicer, is now in Debian Unstable
    After several months of working and waiting, I am happy to report that the nice and user friendly 3D printer slicer software Cura just entered Debian Unstable. It consist of five packages, cura, cura-engine, libarcus, fdm-materials, libsavitar and uranium. The last two, uranium and cura, entered Unstable yesterday. This should make it easier for Debian users to print on at least the Ultimaker class of 3D printers. My nearest 3D printer is an Ultimaker 2+, so it will make life easier for at least me. :)
  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 5
    Today we have celebrated another session for the #PeruRumboGSoC2018 program at CCPP UNI. It was one of the longest sessions we have experienced.
  • Mozilla releases tools and data for speech recognition
    Voice computing has long been a staple of science fiction, but it has only relatively recently made its way into fairly common mainstream use. Gadgets like mobile phones and "smart" home assistant devices (e.g. Amazon Echo, Google Home) have brought voice-based user interfaces to the masses. The voice processing for those gadgets relies on various proprietary services "in the cloud", which generally leaves the free-software world out in the cold. There have been FOSS speech-recognition efforts over the years, but Mozilla's recent announcement of the release of its voice-recognition code and voice data set should help further the goal of FOSS voice interfaces. There are two parts to the release, DeepSpeech, which is a speech-to-text (STT) engine and model, and Common Voice, which is a set of voice data that can be used to train voice-recognition systems. While DeepSpeech is available for those who simply want to do some kind of STT task, Common Voice is meant for those who want to create their own voice-recognition system—potentially one that does even better (or better for certain types of applications) than DeepSpeech.
  • FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Focuses on Faster Boot, Bhyve and LibreSSL Support
    en Moore, the creator of the FreeBSD-based TrueOS computer operating system and Lumina desktop environment, released the TrueOS 17.12 update, which introduces multiple enhancements. Synced with the FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT and FreeBSD ports tree software repositories as of December 4 and November 30, 2017, respectively, TrueOS 17.12 is an incremental update to the operating system adding improvements to the OpenRC-based boot process, removable-device management, LibreSSL and SysAdm API integrations, as well as Bhyve support for TrueOS Server Install. "We have also been working quite a bit on the server offering of TrueOS, and are pleased to provide new text-based server images with support for Virtualization systems such as bhyve," said Ken Moore in the release announcement. "This allows for simple server deployments which also take advantage of the TrueOS improvements to FreeBSD."
  • Will Your Taxes Go Up or Down? A Calculator for the New Tax Bill
    ...Tax-Calculator, an open-source tax-modeling program.

Games: Slaps and Beans and Games Online For Android

  • Slaps and Beans now in Early Access
    Bud Spencer & Terence Hill: Slaps and Beans [Steam] is now in Early Access after a successful Kickstarter campaign in which the developers gained over $200k.
  • Best First Person Shooter Games Online For Android
    With the ever shining genre of First Person Shooters making it Huge in the PC market, game studios have brought the best of FPS action to people’s mobile devices. Here I present to you my best picks for the Free first person shooter games online for Android.

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