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Programming: XOD, PHP 7.2 Release Candidate, Coding Freely, GStreamer Rust Bindings

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  • XOD: A New Open Source Visual Programming Language

    To start let’s quickly go over some of the basic fundamentals of what exactly the XOD programming language is before we get into it more in depth. In short, it is a visual programming language that use nodes to allow you to build programs. A node would be any type of blocks that are some sort of a physical operating device (sensor, relay, motor are all types of nodes). So pretty much a node is anything that is a physical representation of many smaller levels of software/hardware working together to create an end, physical object.

  • PHP on the road to the 7.2.0 release

    Version 7.2.0RC1 is released. It's now enter the stabilisation phase for the developpers, and the test phase for the users.

  • PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 1 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 1. This release is the first Release Candidate for 7.2.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • PHP 7.2 Release Candidate Arrives

    PHP 7.2 has matured past the alpha and beta stages and is now out with its first release candidate.

    PHP 7.2 is being fitted with the new libsodium extension for better cryptography, a number of bug fixes, updated SQLite, improved error messages, DOM enhancements, and many other changes as outlined in the NEWS file.

  • 3 consequences of coding in the open

    I'd never rule out going back to anything closed source (not that I plan on leaving Reaction!), but working full-time in open source has opened my eyes to a whole new side of things that I've truly enjoyed. Absolute transparency has made me a better planner and developer. Having to express my ideas to the world before, during, and after implementing them changes the way I do things. The 24/7 availability is both engrossing and also overwhelming. And finally, working with not just the core team, but our GitHub community, pushes me to make decisions together and grow as a developer.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings release 0.8.0

    As written in the previous blog post, I’m working on nice Rust bindings for GStreamer. Now it’s finally time for the first release, 0.8.0.

    First of all, I should thank Arturo Castro a lot. He worked on the previous GStreamer bindings (versions < 0.8.0), which were all manually written instead of mostly autogenerated like the new ones. As such, the API is now completely different but the old bindings can still be found here.

LLVM 5.0 Release Candidate 4

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  • [llvm-dev] [5.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 4 tagged
  • LLVM 5.0 Release Should Be Imminent

    LLVM 5.0 was supposed to be officially released last week, but instead another release candidate was warranted while the stable debut is expected in the days ahead.

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg opted for a 5.0-RC4 release on Tuesday due to a few more changes trickling in as they try to clear their blocker bug list for this six-month update to the LLVM compiler infrastructure.

  • [Old] Why We Argue: Style

     

    Code is read many more times than it is written, which means that the ultimate cost of code is in its reading. It therefore follows that code should be optimized for readability, which in turn dictates that an application's code should all follow the same style. Adhering to a common style saves you money.

Go, 'First' Programming Languages, and "Flang" Compiler

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  • My use-case for Go

    After using a few very good applications written in Go (Syncthing, Docker and Hugo are some examples) I wanted to get to learn a bit more about the language.

    I'm very interested in programming languages theory and how it could give developers the tools they need to write software in the best possible way and with as many guarantees as possible on the correctness of the resulting applications.

    To get an idea of where programming languages theory is headed have a look at the post Graydon Hoare (the creator of Rust and now one of Swift's developers) published discussing possible new research directions for programming languages.

  • What was your first programming language?

    Whether you first learned to program in a classroom setting, on the job, or by teaching yourself, everyone who has contributed code to an open source project has a story of how they first picked up programming. And no matter if you still use it today, your first language played an important role in shaping your understanding of computer systems.

  • NVIDIA & Co Continue Working On LLVM Fortran "Flang" Compiler

    Since earlier this year NVIDIA posted their work on "Flang", an LLVM-based Fortran compiler, to GitHub while now they have done a formal announcement and update about its status.

KDevelop 5.1.2 released

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KDE

We are pleased to announce the release of KDevelop version 5.1.2, the second bug-fix release for the 5.1 series. This update contains bug fixes only, and we highly recommend all users of KDevelop 5.1.x to switch to this version. Given that it has been a few months since the release of KDevelop 5.1.1, this version contains quite a lot of changes.

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Programming: GitHub, Monitoring Network Traffic, Encryption

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  • This Week in Numbers: Comparing Corporate Open Source Contributions on GitHub Organizations

    ...a significant amount of development works happens outside of an employer’s GitHub organization accounts. For example, Red Hat employees represent a significant number of contributors across a wide range of cloud and container-related projects, but may not get recognized for this because it occurs in non-corporate organizations. Furthermore, it is common for a company to create a separate organization for popular projects. Thus, using this methodology Google does not get recognized for its Angular project, but Facebook gets to bask in React’s glow.

  • Monitoring network traffic more efficiently

    In today’s data networks, traffic analysis — determining which links are getting congested and why — is usually done by computers at the network’s edge, which try to infer the state of the network from the times at which different data packets reach their destinations.

    If the routers inside the network could instead report on their own circumstances, network analysis would be much more precise and efficient, enabling network operators to more rapidly address problems. To that end, router manufacturers have begun equipping their routers with counters that can report on the number of data packets a router has processed in a given time interval.

  • 5 Important Skills That Are About To Die Forever

    One Programmer Owns The World's Best Email Encryption Software, And He's Struggling To Make Ends Meet

Programming: Reducing Python's Startup Time, Makefiles for Golang, Boostnote, OpenJDK and More

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Development
  • Reducing Python's startup time

    The startup time for the Python interpreter has been discussed by the core developers and others numerous times over the years; optimization efforts are made periodically as well. Startup time can dominate the execution time of command-line programs written in Python, especially if they import a lot of other modules. Python startup time is worse than some other scripting languages and more recent versions of the language are taking more than twice as long to start up when compared to earlier versions (e.g. 3.7 versus 2.7). The most recent iteration of the startup time discussion has played out in the python-dev and python-ideas mailing lists since mid-July. This time, the focus has been on the collections.namedtuple() data structure that is used in multiple places throughout the standard library and in other Python modules, but the discussion has been more wide-ranging than simply that.

  • Makefiles for Golang

    Go's toolchain is awesome. make makes the toolchain awesome-er. Go's fast compile times and internal change-tracking eliminate the need for esoteric Makefiles. This is great since we can write simple Makefiles to get the job done in style.

  • Boostnote changes programmers’ note-taking experience

    Hi programmers, what apps do you use for your note-taking? Default Note-app? Evernote?

    But you know, it’s sometimes not useful to use for programming things.

  • OpenJDK may tackle Java security gaps with secretive group

    The proposed OpenJDK (Java Development Kit) Vulnerability Group would provide a secure, private forum in which trusted members of the community receive reports on vulnerabilities in code bases and then review and fix them. Coordinating the release of fixes also would be part of the group’s mandate. (Java SE, the standard edition of Java, has been developed under the auspices of OpenJDK.)

  • Final GSoC Blog Post – Results

    This is my final GSoC update post. My name is Paul Schaub and I participated in the Google Summer of Code for the XMPP Standards Foundation. My project was about implementing encrypted Jingle File Transfer for the client library Smack.

  • BH 1.65.0-1

GNOME: Development, GUADEC, and Recipes

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Development
GNOME
  • The joy of rebuilding…

    I guess we all kind of enjoy breaking things and them fixing them up. It might be one of the reasons we want to be programmers. Find a bug, patch it up, test it, break something with what seemed like a good idea, rollback to an earlier version, fix again… etc. It just never ends. And believe it or not, sometimes it really is fun. Sometimes. Unfortunately for me, what follows is a description of one of the other situations, when you really wouldn’t want your precious build to go nuts, but it does. Spoiler: it does have a happy ending, no worries Smile.

  • GUADEC 2017

    It’s summer and it’s GUADEC time! This year’s GUADEC took place in Manchester, England. It was surprisingly less bad for that location Wink The organisers deserve a big round of applause for having pulled the event off. After having organised last year’s GUADEC I have first hands experience running such an event. So a big “thank you” to the team from England Smile

  • Recipes : Wrapping up GSoC ’17

    Its been almost three months that I embarked on GSoC journey with GNOME. And its time to wrap it up. So here it goes ..

Swift/BSD/LLVM

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Development
BSD

Programming: Agile, Go 1.9, and Teaching Kids Coding

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  • Blog: Adopting an Agile Warrior Mindset Toward Software Development

    Companies and individual tech teams must tailor their approaches to meeting customer needs by using open source practices and assuming an agile warrior mindset...

  • Go 1.9 is released

    Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.9. You can get it from the download page. There are many changes to the language, standard library, runtime, and tooling. This post covers the most significant visible ones. Most of the engineering effort put into this release went to improvements of the runtime and tooling, which makes for a less exciting announcement, but nonetheless a great release.

  • Go 1.9 Adds Type Aliases, Parallel Compilation

    Version 1.9 of Google's Go programming language is now available for developers.

    Go 1.9 features a variety of changes, including on the language front where there is now support for type aliases. Exciting me a lot about Go 1.9 is that it now supports compiling functions for a package in parallel. The concurrent compilation of functions should really speed up the build process and is enabled by default although there is an option to disable it if you so choose.

  • Teaching Kids Coding, by the Book

    One sunny summer morning this month, a group of 20 teenage girls gathered in a conference room in the sleek offices of a tech company in Manhattan. It was their fifth week of coding camp, and they were huddled around laptops, brainstorming designs for their final projects. One group was building a computer game that simulates the experience of going through life with depression and anxiety, while others were drafting plans for websites that track diversity at companies and help connect newly arrived immigrants with local community groups.

    They were working intently when Reshma Saujani, the founder and chief executive of the nonprofit organization Girls Who Code, dropped in to offer some encouragement.

Kernel and Graphics: Linux 4.12.9, 4.9.45, 4.4.84, and 3.18.67, Driver Development

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Licences: Eclipse Public Licence 2.0, GPL Copyright Troll, Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0

  • Eclipse Public License version 2.0 added to license list
    We recently updated our list of various licenses and comments about them to include the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 (EPL). In terms of GPL compatibility, the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 is essentially equivalent to version 1.0. The only change is that it explicitly offers the option of designating the GNU GPL version 2 or later as a "secondary license" for a certain piece of code.
  • Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman and several other senior Linux figures have published a “Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement” to be included in future Linux documentation, in order to ensure contributions to the kernel don't fall foul of copyright claims that have already seen a single developer win "at least a few million Euros.” In a post released on Monday, October 16th, Kroah-Hartman explained the Statement's needed because not everyone who contributes to the kernel understands the obligations the GNU Public Licence 2.0 (GPL 2.0), and the licence has “ambiguities … that no one in our community has ever considered part of compliance.”
  • Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0
    After many years of working on it, it is with immense pleasure to see the FLA-2.0 – the full rewrite of the Fiduciary License Agreement – officially launch.

Security: Let’s Encrypt, Updates, Google, DHS, Adobe

LibreOffice, LiMux, KDE, Qt, and Krita

  • Coming up on Friday: first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.0 Alpha 1
    The LibreOffice community has returned from a great conference in Rome (more on that later this week), and we’re now working eagerly on LibreOffice 6.0, which is due to be released at the end of January 2018. This version will include a large number of new features – and those already implemented are summarised on the release notes page.
  • LibreOffice Is Getting New Look for KDE's Plasma Desktop Thanks to LiMux Project
    During the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event that took place in Rome, Italy, from October 10 to October 13, there were talks about the status the Qt 5 port of LibreOffice's VCL plugin for KDE Plasma. Every year, The Document Foundation plans and organizes a LibreOffice Conference event where developers, contributors, sponsors, users, and other members of the LibreOffice community can gather to talk about the future of the Open Souce office suite. And this year they planned the new features of the next major release of the cross-platform office suite, LibreOffice 6.0, which will arrive in late January 2018 with a new look for the KDE Plasma desktop environment, work that will be sponsored by the LiMux project.
  • KDE still makes Qt
    A couple of years ago, I made a blog post, KDE makes Qt, with data about which percentage of Qt contributions came from people starting in KDE. Basically, how many Qt contributions are made by people who used KDE as a “gateway” drug into it.
  • Krita 3.3.1 Best Alternative To Photoshop for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    Krita is a KDE program for sketching and painting, although it has image processing capabilities, offering an end–to–end solution for creating digital painting files from scratch by masters. Fields of painting that Krita explicitly supports are concept art, creation of comics and textures for rendering. Modelled on existing real-world painting materials and workflows, Krita supports creative working by getting out of the way and with a snappy response.

Fedora 27 Now Under Its Final Freeze

Today marks the final freeze for Fedora 27 with hopes of shipping the official release soon. Only being permitted to land in the F27 repository until the official release will be accepted blocker bug fixes and feature freeze exceptions. Read more