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Development

Programming: Kotlin vs Java, PHP 7.3.0 Now in Beta

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Development
  • Well, this makes scents: Kotlin code quality smells better than Java

    Kotlin, which Google blessed last year as an alternative to Java for programming Android apps, has already made its way into almost 12 per cent of open source Android apps, and in so doing has elevated their code quality.

    So we're told by computer scientists Bruno Gois Mateus and Matias Martinez, affiliated with University of Valenciennes in France, who observed that Google at the end of 2017 said Kotlin had infiltrated more than 17 per cent of Android apps developed with its IDE, Android Studio 3.0.

  • PHP 7.3.0.beta1 Released

    The PHP team is glad to announce the release of the fifth PHP 7.3.0 version, PHP 7.3.0beta1. The rough outline of the PHP 7.3 release cycle is specified in the PHP Wiki.

    For source downloads of PHP 7.3.0beta1 please visit the download page. Windows sources and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/qa/.

  • PHP 7.3 Enters Feature Freeze & Releases Beta

    The end of July marked the code branching and feature freeze for PHP 7.3 followed by the creation of the first beta.

    PHP 7.3 introduces a net_get_interfaces() function to enumerate detected network adapters in a cross-platform manner, adds is_countable() for determining if a variable can be counted, drops support for BeOS, adds WebP support for the GD image create from string function, updates against a newer SQLite library, improves PHP garbage collection performance, and a lot of bug fixes.

Announcing Rust 1.28

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The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.28.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

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Programming: ProjectQ and Rust

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Development
Moz/FF
Sci/Tech
  • Open-Source Software Framework Makes Quantum Computing More Accessible

    To help further this field, Häner and a team at ETH Zurich created ProjectQ, a free, open-source software framework for quantum computing that allows users to implement their quantum programs in the high-level programming language Python using a powerful and intuitive syntax. ProjectQ can then translate these programs to any type of back-end, either a simulator run on a classical computer or an actual quantum chip.

  • This Week in Rust 245

    Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

GNU C Library 2.28

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GNU

Programming: GNU/Linux Development Workstations

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Development
  • Create your Linux development workstation in seconds

    Linux is the best platform for developers. Here’s how you can get popular languages and development environments up and running in moments. The first step is to install snapd (the service that runs and manages Snaps) on your distro, then you can install your pick from some of our recommendations below.

  • Web development on a phone with Hugo and Termux

    Hugo is an excellent static site generator and website framework.

    You can build a static web site using your phone by running Hugo on LineageOS under Termux.

    Here’s how:

7 Python libraries for more maintainable code

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Development

It's easy to let readability and coding standards fall by the wayside when a software project moves into "maintenance mode." (It's also easy to never establish those standards in the first place.) But maintaining consistent style and testing standards across a codebase is an important part of decreasing the maintenance burden, ensuring that future developers are able to quickly grok what's happening in a new-to-them project and safeguarding the health of the app over time.

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Programming: GitLab, C++17, GCC

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Development
  • Introducing freedesktop.org GitLab

    This is quite a long post. The executive summary is that freedesktop.org now hosts an instance of GitLab, which is generally available and now our preferred platform for hosting going forward. We think it offers a vastly better service, and we needed to do it in order to offer the projects we host the modern workflows they have been asking for.

    In parallel, we’re working on making our governance, including policies, processes and decision making, much more transparent.

  • GitLab Is A Vast Improvement To FreeDesktop.org's Infrastructure

    Taking place the past few months has been migrating the FreeDesktop.org infrastructure to GitLab and the developers/administrators involved are quite happy with this big improvement to better their code hosting, issue tracking, etc.

    The FreeDesktop.org GitLab deployment is happening on Google Compute Engine to also replace aging FreeDesktop.org hardware in the process. Among the FreeDesktop.org projects moving over to GitLab has been Mesa, X.Org, and other sub-projects. This also follows a larger trend among other free software projects centering on GitLab for their infrastructure needs with the previous most notable project having been GNOME.

  • C++17 Filesystem Support Lands In LLVM's Libc++ Library

    This week support for the official C++17 "filesystem" feature landed within LLVM's libc++ standard library.

    C++17 adds file-system abstractions based upon the Boost library's filesystem support. This functionality makes it easier for C++ programs to perform file/directory operations across platforms in a standard manner. The file-system technical specification continues to be available here for all of the details.

  • Updated ARM Patches Posted For Mitigating Spectre V1 With GCC Compiler

    ARM's Richard Earnshaw has posted a revised version for their months-in-development patch-set for mitigating against unsafe data speculation by the GCC code compiler. This new Spectre V1 mitigation for ARM 64-bit would be exposed via a new -mtrack-speculation compiler switch.

    This second version of the Spectre V1 mitigation work led by ARM for the GCC compiler is now available. This new version incorporates the feedback garnered months ago when these initial patches were published and uses a new approach for tracking data speculation to see whether the CPU's control flow speculation matches the data flow calculations.

UniverCity, an isometric university management game arrives in Early Access next month, developed on Linux

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Gaming

Yep. I use ArchLinux to develop the game on and test SteamOS and Windows via a VM.

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Top Open Source Python Projects For Beginners

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OSS

“What are the best open source Python projects to contribute to?” This is one of the most frequent questions posed by beginners. As a learner, contributing to open source projects is the best way to understand the code, the test infrastructure and build environment and the framework. Working on a project is also a great way to test your application, find and fix bugs and update documentation. Now GitHub has a number of beginner-friendly Python projects, but it takes a bit of time to understand the Git workflow as well. For example, knowing features such as push, pull, merge master and rollback among others, could come in handy.

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A Git Origin Story

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Development

Linus coded in seclusion for a brief time, then shared his new conception with the world. Within days of beginning the project in June of 2005, Linus' git revision control system had become fully self-hosting. Within weeks, it was ready to host Linux kernel development. Within a couple months, it reached full functionality. At this point, Linus turned the project's maintainership over to its most enthusiastic contributor, Junio C. Hamano, and returned full-time to Linux development once again.

A stunned community of free software developers struggled to understand this bizarre creation. It did not resemble any other attempts at revision control software. In fact, it seemed more like a bunch of low-level filesystem operations, than a revision control system. And instead of storing patches as other systems did, it stored whole versions of each changed file. How could this possibly be good? On the other hand, it could handle forks and merges with lightning speed and could generate patches rapidly on demand.

Gradually, Junio drew together a set of higher-level commands that more closely resembled those of tools like CVS and Subversion. If the original set of git commands were the "plumbing", this new set of commands were the "porcelain". And, so they came to be called.

As much as there had been controversy and resentment over BitKeeper, there was enthusiasm and participation in the further development of git. Ports, extensions and websites popped up all over the place. Within a few years, pretty much everyone used git. Like Linux, it had taken over the world.

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Also: Improve your Python skills this weekend

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More in Tux Machines

New SparkyLinux 5.5 "Nibiru" ISOs Released with Latest Debian Buster Updates

The new SparkyLinux 5.5 "Nibiru" Rolling images are now synced with the Debian Testing (soon to become Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster") software repositories as of September 17, 2018, which means that they are now shipping the Linux 4.18.6 kernel, the Calamares 3.2.1 installer, as well as the latest GCC 8 system compiler by default aas GCC 7 has been completely removed. "There are new live/install iso images of SparkyLinux 5.5 “Nibiru” available to download. The live system of MinimalGUI/CLI uses Debian’s Linux kernel 4.18.6 as default. The live system of LXQt, due to a problem with long loading the desktop, features Sparky’s Linux kernel 4.18.8 (32bit pae/64bit amd64) as default; and the Debian’s one as well," reads the release announcement. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.04 and 18.10 Hybrid Laptop Users Invited to Test Nvidia PRIME Support

With the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) as the first LTS (Long Term Support) Ubuntu release to ship with the GNOME desktop environment by default instead of Canonical's in-house built Unity desktop, hybrid laptop users with Intel and Nvidia GPUs lost the way Nvidia PRIME worked in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) series. But it looks like some Ubuntu developers like Alberto Milone never stopped looking for a fix, and he and his team have successfully released a patch for the bug causing increased power consumption when using the power saving profile with the Nvidia GPU turned off, as well as the inability to switch between power profiles when logging out. Read more