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Development

GNU C Library 2.28

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GNU

Programming: GNU/Linux Development Workstations

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Development
  • Create your Linux development workstation in seconds

    Linux is the best platform for developers. Here’s how you can get popular languages and development environments up and running in moments. The first step is to install snapd (the service that runs and manages Snaps) on your distro, then you can install your pick from some of our recommendations below.

  • Web development on a phone with Hugo and Termux

    Hugo is an excellent static site generator and website framework.

    You can build a static web site using your phone by running Hugo on LineageOS under Termux.

    Here’s how:

7 Python libraries for more maintainable code

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Development

It's easy to let readability and coding standards fall by the wayside when a software project moves into "maintenance mode." (It's also easy to never establish those standards in the first place.) But maintaining consistent style and testing standards across a codebase is an important part of decreasing the maintenance burden, ensuring that future developers are able to quickly grok what's happening in a new-to-them project and safeguarding the health of the app over time.

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Programming: GitLab, C++17, GCC

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  • Introducing freedesktop.org GitLab

    This is quite a long post. The executive summary is that freedesktop.org now hosts an instance of GitLab, which is generally available and now our preferred platform for hosting going forward. We think it offers a vastly better service, and we needed to do it in order to offer the projects we host the modern workflows they have been asking for.

    In parallel, we’re working on making our governance, including policies, processes and decision making, much more transparent.

  • GitLab Is A Vast Improvement To FreeDesktop.org's Infrastructure

    Taking place the past few months has been migrating the FreeDesktop.org infrastructure to GitLab and the developers/administrators involved are quite happy with this big improvement to better their code hosting, issue tracking, etc.

    The FreeDesktop.org GitLab deployment is happening on Google Compute Engine to also replace aging FreeDesktop.org hardware in the process. Among the FreeDesktop.org projects moving over to GitLab has been Mesa, X.Org, and other sub-projects. This also follows a larger trend among other free software projects centering on GitLab for their infrastructure needs with the previous most notable project having been GNOME.

  • C++17 Filesystem Support Lands In LLVM's Libc++ Library

    This week support for the official C++17 "filesystem" feature landed within LLVM's libc++ standard library.

    C++17 adds file-system abstractions based upon the Boost library's filesystem support. This functionality makes it easier for C++ programs to perform file/directory operations across platforms in a standard manner. The file-system technical specification continues to be available here for all of the details.

  • Updated ARM Patches Posted For Mitigating Spectre V1 With GCC Compiler

    ARM's Richard Earnshaw has posted a revised version for their months-in-development patch-set for mitigating against unsafe data speculation by the GCC code compiler. This new Spectre V1 mitigation for ARM 64-bit would be exposed via a new -mtrack-speculation compiler switch.

    This second version of the Spectre V1 mitigation work led by ARM for the GCC compiler is now available. This new version incorporates the feedback garnered months ago when these initial patches were published and uses a new approach for tracking data speculation to see whether the CPU's control flow speculation matches the data flow calculations.

UniverCity, an isometric university management game arrives in Early Access next month, developed on Linux

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Gaming

Yep. I use ArchLinux to develop the game on and test SteamOS and Windows via a VM.

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Top Open Source Python Projects For Beginners

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OSS

“What are the best open source Python projects to contribute to?” This is one of the most frequent questions posed by beginners. As a learner, contributing to open source projects is the best way to understand the code, the test infrastructure and build environment and the framework. Working on a project is also a great way to test your application, find and fix bugs and update documentation. Now GitHub has a number of beginner-friendly Python projects, but it takes a bit of time to understand the Git workflow as well. For example, knowing features such as push, pull, merge master and rollback among others, could come in handy.

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A Git Origin Story

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Development

Linus coded in seclusion for a brief time, then shared his new conception with the world. Within days of beginning the project in June of 2005, Linus' git revision control system had become fully self-hosting. Within weeks, it was ready to host Linux kernel development. Within a couple months, it reached full functionality. At this point, Linus turned the project's maintainership over to its most enthusiastic contributor, Junio C. Hamano, and returned full-time to Linux development once again.

A stunned community of free software developers struggled to understand this bizarre creation. It did not resemble any other attempts at revision control software. In fact, it seemed more like a bunch of low-level filesystem operations, than a revision control system. And instead of storing patches as other systems did, it stored whole versions of each changed file. How could this possibly be good? On the other hand, it could handle forks and merges with lightning speed and could generate patches rapidly on demand.

Gradually, Junio drew together a set of higher-level commands that more closely resembled those of tools like CVS and Subversion. If the original set of git commands were the "plumbing", this new set of commands were the "porcelain". And, so they came to be called.

As much as there had been controversy and resentment over BitKeeper, there was enthusiasm and participation in the further development of git. Ports, extensions and websites popped up all over the place. Within a few years, pretty much everyone used git. Like Linux, it had taken over the world.

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Also: Improve your Python skills this weekend

GCC 8.2 Released

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Development
GNU
  • GCC 8.2 Released

    The GNU Compiler Collection version 8.2 has been released.

    GCC 8.2 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 8 branch containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.1 with more than 99 bugs fixed since the previous release.

  • GCC 8.2 Released, GCC 8.3 Coming Around Year's End

    Jakub Jelinek of Red Hat today announced the relase of GCC 8.2 stable as the first point relase to the stable GCC 8 compiler that debuted earlier this year.

    GCC 8.2 just contains bug/regression fixes over GCC 8.1. Coming in though as perhaps the most notable fix for GCC 8.2 is fixed tuning when using -march=native on Intel Skylake CPUs and newer with this glaring shortcoming having been part of the GCC8 release for several months. If you tune for "-march=native" on GCC 8 with newer Intel CPUs, this fix may be noticeable for performance-sensitive workloads.

The PEP 572 endgame

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Over the last few months, it became clear that the battle over PEP 572 would be consequential; its scale and vehemence was largely unprecedented in the history of Python. The announcement by Guido van Rossum that he was stepping down from his role as benevolent dictator for life (BDFL), due in part to that battle, underscored the importance of it. While the Python project charts its course in the wake of his resignation, it makes sense to catch up on where things stand with this contentious PEP that has now been accepted for Python 3.8.

We first looked at the discussion around PEP 572 back in March, when the second version of the PEP was posted to the python-ideas mailing list. The idea is to allow variable assignment inline, so that certain constructs can be written more easily. That way, an if or while, for example, could have a variable assignment in the statement and the value of the variable could be used elsewhere in the block (and, perhaps, beyond). The scope of those assignments is one of the areas that has evolved most since the PEP was first introduced.

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Programming Leftovers

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Fedora and Red Hat News: Test Day, Fedora 29 Beta, Istio, Java and Microsoft Blobs

  • Test Day: Java 8,10,11
    Test Day will focus on OpenJDK 11 and OpenJDK 10. Currently, we have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK in Fedora. It accompanied java-1.7.0-openjdk as JRE for a year, and replaced it in buildroot in F21. Similarly, as did java-1.7.0-openjdk to java-1.6.0-openjdk in F16 as parallel JRE and replaced it in F17 in build root and main JDK. However, today the situation is more complicated. Oracle changed release process, see OpenJDK 11 summary and OpenJDK 10 summary, so currently, in F27 and up, you have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK, java-openjdk as rolling release of STS JDK 10, and java-11-openjdk as techpreview of future LTS JDK. Javaws is provided in another package – icedtea-web
  • Fedora 29 Is On Track With A Lot Of Changes
    With Fedora 29 Beta set to ship today, here's a reminder about some of the great changes on the way with this next installment of the Fedora Linux distribution that is on track to officially release around the end of October. - GNOME 3.30 makes up the default desktop environment and the many improvements to the GNOME Shell / Mutter and all the contained components.
  • Red Hat weaves Istio’s Service Mesh into OpenShift
    If you were thinking that what Red Hat’s Openshift platform really needs is a service mesh, your prayers have been answered, courtesy of Istio. As long you don’t actually plan to use it in production anytime soon. Red Hatter Erik Jacobs said in a blog post yesterday that the firm had unleashed the first technology preview of the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, and that it was based on the Google, IBM and Lyft-backed Istio. Istio is designed to take the complexity of managing microservices architectures away from the application developer or DevOps team. Istio’s backers pitch it as taking care of load balancing and monitoring, as well handling authentication and communications between services, access and traffic control.
  • 6 personality traits driving your organization
  • Scaling Java Containers
    As enterprises increasingly adopt the advantages of deploying containerized applications, it is important to address the potential misconception that the JVM does not play nicely in the cloud. While it is true that most JVMs may not come out of the box perfectly configured to run in an elastic cloud environment, the wide variety of system properties available allows the JVM to be tuned to get the most out of a host environment. If a containerized application is deployed using Red Hat OpenShift, the application could take advantage of the Kubernetes Vertical Pod Autoscaler (VPA), which is an alpha feature. The VPA is a perfect example of where the JVM’s default memory management settings could diminish the increased resource utilization offered by such a feature. This blog post will walk through the steps of configuring and testing a containerized Java application for use with the VPA, which demonstrates the inherent adaptability of the JVM to cloud platforms.
  • A certified sequel: SQL Server on Red Hat’s cloud-native technologies [Ed: "Mike Ferris is vice president of business architecture at Red Hat." Now he's selling nonfree software (likely with back doors) from Microsoft]
  • FY2019 EPS Estimates for Red Hat Inc Raised by William Blair (RHT)
  • Enthralling Stocks: Ensco plc, (NYSE: ESV), Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

Taking the Audiophile Linux distro for a spin

For a completely different experience, take a look at the Ragazze Quartet’s performance of Terry Riley’s "Four Four Three." I picked up ahigh-resolutionn version of this fascinating music from Channel Classics, which operates a Linux-friendly download store (no bloatware to install on your computer). And finally, I was saddened to hear of the recent passing of Rachid Taha, whose wonderful blend of North African and French musical traditions, along with his frank confrontation of the challenges of being North African and living in Europe, has made some powerful—and fun—music. Check out Taha’s version of "Rock the Casbah." I have a few of his songs scattered around various compilation albums, and some time ago bought the CD version of Rachid Taha: The Definitive Collection, which I’ve been enjoying again recently. Read more

A Quick Test Of NVIDIA's "Carmel" CPU Performance

NVIDIA's Tegra Xavier SoC is becoming more widely available now that the Jetson Xavier Development Kit has begun shipping. Besides this latest SoC being an exciting design with its Volta-based GPU and having a Tensor Processing Unit / Deep Learning Accelerator, it's exciting on the CPU side as well with NVIDIA's custom-designed ARMv8 "Carmel" CPU cores. The Tegra194 (Xavier) SoC features eight 10-wide superscalar Carmel CPU cores that are based on the ARMv8.2-A architecture and manufactured on a TSMC 12nm FinFET process. Read more