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Qt 5.10 and Qt Creator 4.5

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  • Qt Creator 4.5.0 released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.5.0!

  • Qt 5.10 released

    I’m happy to let you all know that Qt 5.10 has just been released. Qt 5.10 comes with a ton of new functionalities that I’m thrilled to talk to you about.

  • Qt 5.10 Released Along With Qt Creator 4.5

    Qt 5.10 is now officially out as the half-year update to the Qt5 tool-kit.

    Qt 5.10 is arriving just a few days late and is a big feature update. Qt 5.10 features many improvements to Qt Quick and QML, initial Vulkan support, support for streaming Qt UIs to WebGL-enabled browsers, OpenGL ES improvements, new functionality in Qt 3D, a new QRandomGenerator as a "high quality" RNG, OpenSSL 1.1 support in Qt Network, embedded improvements, updated Qt WebEngine, and Qt Network Authentication for OAuth/OAuth2 support and Qt Speech for text-to-speech capabilities. There's a whole lot more as well.

Programming/Development: Java, GitLab, C++ and Python

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  • Hazelcast joins Eclipse Foundation to collaborate on open source enterprise Java

    Hazelcast, the open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) with tens of thousands of installed clusters and over 39 million server starts per month, announced it had joined the Eclipse Foundation, bringing extensive Java-driven community experience to a host of open source projects.

    Working collaboratively with other members of the Eclipse community, Hazelcast’s primary focus will be on JCache, the Eclipse MicroProfile and EE4J.

    In particular, Hazelcast will be collaborating with members to popularise JCache, a Java Specification Request (JSR-107) which specifies API and semantics for temporary, in-memory caching of Java objects, including object creation, shared access, spooling, invalidation, and consistency across JVM’s. These operations help scale out applications and manage their high-speed access to frequently used data. In the Java Community Process (JCP), Hazelcast’s CEO, Greg Luck, has been the co spec lead and then maintenance lead on “JCache – Java Temporary Caching API” since 2007.

  • GitLab update: Moving to the next step

    I have good news, after few meetings and discussions with GitLab we reached an agreement on a way to bring the features we need and to fix our most important blockers in a reasonable time and in a way that are synced with us. Their team will fix our blockers in the next 1-2 months, most of them will be fix in the release of 22th of December and the rest if everything goes well in the release of 22th of January. The one left that out of those 2 months is a richer UI experience for duplicates, which is going to be an ongoing effort.

    Apologies for the blockage for those that regularly asked to migrate their project, I wanted to make sure we are doing things in the right steps. I also wanted to make sure that I get feedback and comments about the initiative all around in my effort to make a representation of the community for taking these decisions. Now it’s the point where I’m confident, the feedback and comments both inside and outside of our core community has been largely that we should start our path to fully migrate to GitLab.

  • Khronos Releases SYCL 1.2.1 With TensorFlow Acceleration, C++17 Alignment

    SYCL as a reminder is Khronos' higher-level OpenCL programming model based on C++. It's been a while since the last update, but a new point release is now available.

    SYCL 1.2.1 is based on OpenCL 1.2 and improves support for machine learning tasks, supports TensorFlow acceleration, and aligns with the latest C++17 standard. SYCL 1.2 had previously been based on C++11/C++14. The C++17 standard was just firmed up this month.

  • Python data classes

    The reminder that the feature freeze for Python 3.7 is coming up fairly soon (January 29) was met with a flurry of activity on the python-dev mailing list. Numerous Python enhancement proposals (PEPs) were updated or newly proposed; other features or changes have been discussed as well. One of the updated PEPs is proposing a new type of class, a "data class", to be added to the standard library. Data classes would serve much the same purpose as structures or records in other languages and would use the relatively new type annotations feature to support static type checking of the use of the classes.

    PEP 557 ("Data Classes") came out of a discussion on the python-ideas mailing list back in May, but its roots go back much further than that. The attrs module, which is aimed at reducing the boilerplate code needed for Python classes, is a major influence on the design of data classes, though it goes much further than the PEP. attrs is not part of the standard library, but is available from the Python Package Index (PyPI); it has been around for a few years and is quite popular with many Python developers. The idea behind both attrs and data classes is to automatically generate many of the "dunder" methods (e.g. __init__(), __repr__()) needed, especially for a class that is largely meant to hold various typed data items.

OSS and Programming: DeepVariant, Embedded Linux Conference, Voice Dataset, Glibc, NuttX and More

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  • Google makes AI tool for precision medicine open source

    Google announced Monday an open source version of DeepVariant, the artificial intelligence tool that last year earned the highest accuracy rating at the precisionFDA’s Truth Challenge.

    The open source tool comes as academic medical centers, hospitals, insurance companies and other healthcare organizations are gearing up for if not already embarking on artificial intelligence, cognitive computing and machine learning as well as precision medicine and the genomic sequencing that entails.

    Likewise, Google rivals IBM and Microsoft are all moving into the healthcare AI space while much speculation surrounds Apple and Amazon making forays into the space.

  • One Month Left to Submit Your Talk to ELC + OpenIoT Summit NA 2018

    Embedded Linux Conference (ELC), happening March 12-14 in Portland, OR, gathers kernel and systems developers, and the technologists building the applications running on embedded Linux platforms, to learn about the newest and most interesting embedded technologies, gain access to leading experts, have fascinating discussions, collaborate with peers, and gain a competitive advantage with innovative embedded Linux solutions.

  • Mozilla Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Engine and Voice Dataset

    After launching Firefox Quantum, Mozilla continues its upward trend and releases its Open Source Speech Recognition Model and Voice Dataset. Well, Mozilla is finally back!

    In the past few years, technical advancements have contributed to a rapid evolution of speech interfaces and, subsequently, of speech-enabled devices powered by machine learning technologies. And thanks to Mozilla’s latest efforts, things look better than ever.

  • Glibc Rolls Out Support For Memory Protection Keys

    While kernel side there's been Memory Protection Keys support since Linux 4.9 and work has already landed in GCC and Clang, the glibc GNU C Library is finally adding support for MPK.

  • Scheme For NuttX

    To fix the first problem, I decided to try and just implement scheme. The language I had implemented wasn't far off; it had lexical scoping and call-with-current-continuation after all. The rest is pretty simple stuff.

    To fix the second problem, I ported the interpreter to NuttX. NuttX is a modest operating system for 8 to 32-bit microcontrollers with a growing community of developers.

  • SD Times news digest: Android Oreo 8.1 (Go edition), Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, and Django 2.0

Programming: Lua, Qt 3D, C++

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  • easy gopher-lua bridge
  • Increasing the number of lights in Qt 3D

    While it is possible to draw scenes with almost unlimited numbers of lights using deferred rendering in Qt 3D, the default materials in Qt 3D Extras have been limited to eight lights because they are tied to forward rendering. Although we apply a few tricks that allow you to define more than eight lights in the scene, we only select the eight closest lights when rendering.

  • Qt Company offers 3D interface authoring system

    Emanating from its development bases in Helsinki, Finland and Santa Clara, California, Qt explains that its latest product is a 3D design and development tool for major industrial use cases.

  • C++17 Final Standard Is Now Official

    Earlier this year in May, we told you that C++17 standard is now feature complete and expected to ship soon. Well, if you’ve been waiting for the same, that time has finally arrived as the official standard has been published on

Programming: Haskell in 2017 and C++17

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  • Reflecting on Haskell in 2017

    Alas, another year has come and gone. It feels like just yesterday I was writing the last reflection blog post on my flight back to Boston for Christmas. I’ve spent most of the last year traveling and working in Europe, meeting a lot of new Haskellers and putting a lot of faces to names.

    Haskell has had a great year and 2017 was defined by vast quantities of new code, including 14,000 new Haskell projects on Github . The amount of writing this year was voluminous and my list of interesting work is eight times as large as last year. At least seven new companies came into existence and many existing firms unexpectedly dropped large open source Haskell projects into the public sphere. Driven by a lot of software catastrophes, the intersection of security, software correctness and formal methods have been become quite an active area of investment and research across both industry and academia. It’s really never been an easier and more exciting time to be programming professionally in the world’s most advanced (yet usable) statically typed language.

    Per what I guess is now a tradition, I will write my end of year retrospective on my highlights of what happened in the Haskell scene in retrospect.

  • C++17 Is Now Official

    The final standard of C++17 (formerly known as "C++1z") is now official.

    The final standard of C++17 has been published as ISO/IEC 14882:2017 and has been published on

    C++17 introduces a number of new language features, support for UTF-8 character literals, inline variables, fold expressions, and more. On the C++ standard library side is parallel versions of the STL algorithms, a file-system library derived from Boost, and other additions.

Django 2.0 release

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These release notes cover the new features, as well as some backwards incompatible changes you’ll want to be aware of when upgrading from Django 1.11 or earlier. We’ve dropped some features that have reached the end of their deprecation cycle, and we’ve begun the deprecation process for some features.

This release starts Django’s use of a loose form of semantic versioning, but there aren’t any major backwards incompatible changes that might be expected of a 2.0 release. Upgrading should be a similar amount of effort as past feature releases.

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Programming/Development: Python, Light Table IDE, Kotlin, PHP and Perl

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  • NCSA SPIN Intern Daniel Johnson Develops Open Source HPC Python Package

    At the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), undergraduate SPIN (Students Pushing INnovation) intern Daniel Johnson joined NCSA’s Gravity Group to study Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, specifically numerical relativity. Daniel has used the open source, numerical relativity software, the Einstein Toolkit on the Blue Waters supercomputer to numerically solve Einstein’s general relativity equations to study the collision of black holes, and the emission of gravitational waves from these astrophysical events. During his SPIN internship, Daniel developed an open source, Python package to streamline these numerical analyses in high performance computing (HPC) environments.

  • Light Table – A Next-Generation Open-Source and Customizable IDE

    Light Table is a free, customizable, functional, and open-source IDE with a modern and intuitive User Interface, plugin support, command pane, and connection manager.

    It was created by Chris Granger and Robert Attorri in mostly ClojureScript with the aim of providing developers to write and debug software with ease while getting smart feedback from the IDE and exchanging creative ideas with other users in the Light Table community.

  • Kotlin 1.2 Released: Sharing Code between Platforms

    Today we’re releasing Kotlin 1.2. This is a major new release and a big step on our road towards enabling the use of Kotlin across all components of a modern application.

    In Kotlin 1.1, we officially released the JavaScript target, allowing you to compile Kotlin code to JS and to run it in your browser. In Kotlin 1.2, we’re adding the possibility to reuse code between the JVM and JavaScript. Now you can write the business logic of your application once, and reuse it across all tiers of your application – the backend, the browser frontend and the Android mobile app. We’re also working on libraries to help you reuse more of the code, such as a cross-platform serialization library.

  • PHP 7.2 And Kotlin 1.2 Programming Languages Released

    Kotlin 1.2 Moving to Kotlin–the latest programming language to get official Android support. JetBrains announced Kotlin 1.2 and called it a major release which will let the devs reuse code between JVM and JS.

  • Rcpp now used by 1250 CRAN packages

Programming/Development: Linux Perf, ESR on Languages, GStreamer Rust Bindings, and Python/Pygame

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  • Update to Linux perf report

    Linux perf is an immensely useful and powerful tool suite for profiling of C/C++ applications.
    I have used it extensively and successfully on various customer projects, both for desktop applications as well as automotive or industrial projects targeting low-end embedded Linux targets running on ARM hardware.

  • The big break in computer languages

    My last post (The long goodbye to C) elicited a comment from a C++ expert I was friends with long ago, recommending C++ as the language to replace C. Which ain’t gonna happen; if that were a viable future, Go and Rust would never have been conceived.

    But my readers deserve more than a bald assertion. So here, for the record, is the story of why I don’t touch C++ any more. This is a launch point for a disquisition on the economics of computer-language design, why some truly unfortunate choices got made and baked into our infrastructure, and how we’re probably going to fix them.

    Along the way I will draw aside the veil from a rather basic mistake that people trying to see into the future of programming languages (including me) have been making since the 1980s. Only very recently do we have the field evidence to notice where we went wrong.

    I think I first picked up C++ because I needed GNU eqn to be able to output MathXML, and eqn was written in C++. That project succeeded. Then I was a senior dev on Battle For Wesnoth for a number of years in the 2000s and got comfortable with the language.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings release 0.9

    About 3 months, a GStreamer Conference and two bug-fix releases have passed now since the GStreamer Rust bindings release 0.8.0. Today version 0.9.0 (and 0.9.1 with a small bugfix to export some forgotten types) with a couple of API improvements and lots of additions and cleanups was released. This new version depends on the new set of releases of the gtk-rs crates (glib/etc).

  • Why Python and Pygame are a great pair for beginning programmers

    Last month, Scott Nesbitt wrote about Mozilla awarding $500K to support open source projects. Phaser, a HTML/JavaScript game platform, was awarded $50,000. I’ve been teaching Phaser to my pre-teen daughter for a year, and it's one of the best and easiest HTML game development platforms to learn. Pygame, however, may be a better choice for beginners. Here's why.

Krita Development and Qt Development

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  • Krita Development Sprint 2017

    With all the turmoil the project experienced in 2017 it looked for a while as if we wouldn’t have a face to face meeting this year. But that’s not good for a project working on its fourth major release! We knew we really had to sit together, and finally managed to have a smaller than usual, but very productive, sprint in Deventer, the Netherlands from Thursday 23th to Sunday 26th.

    Not having been together since August 2016, we had an agenda stuffed with a enormous backlog of items. And since we’ve been working on new code for a long time ago, our bug tracker was also slowly dying from elephantiasis of the database.

    Let’s do the bug tracker first: we managed to close over 120 bugs! Not every bug that gets closed gets closed with a fix: the problem is that most bug reports are actually help requests from users, and many of the rest are duplicates, or requests for features that are irrelevant for Krita. Still, while triaging the list of open and unconfirmed bug reports, we managed to fix more than a dozen real bugs.

  • [Krita] Interview with Radian

    I tend to hate any of my artwork if it is more than 1-3 months old but there are a couple of exceptions. The Kiki painting I made for the artbook “Made with Krita” is one of them. I used a bunch of new tricks in here and probably made a few good choices by accident.

  • Porting Applications to Qt

    KDAB has unique experience in porting the code base for toolkits like Qt 3, Qt 4, Motif, Java, Tcl, GTK, .NET, MFC, and Photon to Qt 5. Porting legacy GUI toolkits to Qt 5 is a job where proven experience saves a lot of time.

  • QtVirtualKeyboard on Wayland

    For the last couple of years my focus was on the Osmocom project to bring Free Software to the world of telecommunication. With a group of enthusiasts we have implemented the components necessary to run a complete network using Free Software. The Rhizomatica project is using the software to connecting people that were left behind. Our tools enabled high impact security research leading, leading to improvements to privacy and security for all of us….

    But during the last months I had the opportunity to return to C++ and Qt work and it feels like coming home to the world of ARM powered hardware. When I left, the transition from consumer electronics (e.g. settop boxes) to automative (e.g. IVI) began and it seems it successfully completed! On Friday I explored a regression in OpenSSL and today I had the pleasure to understand input method handling of wayland a little bit better.

    I wanted to see if I can use wayland and run QtVirtualKeyboard only in the Compositor. I couldn’t find answers in the documentation and started to read the code. Once I understood how it should work, I found a simple example in QtWayland. Isn’t Qt wonderful?

Programming/Development: GCC and LLVM/Clang

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  • GCC Lands Cannonlake, Skylake Costs; LLVM/Clang Gets Intel CET

    In addition to the GCC plugin support on Windows/MinGW, there are more compiler happenings this weekend.

    Hitting mainline GCC since that earlier post about the MinGW plugin support is this commit landing the -march=cannonlake target for these next-gen Intel CPUs. It's among the many GCC 8 features and previously covered the Cannonlake enablement while now it's been merged to mainline.

  • LLVM Picks Up 3DNow! Improvements In 2017

    As a flashback to the past, hitting the LLVM Git/SVN code today were improvements for those still running with processors supporting AMD's 3DNow! extensions.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games Chronicon, BROKE PROTOCOL, Internet Archive

  • 2D action RPG 'Chronicon' to arrive on Linux with the next big update
    The colourful action RPG Chronicon [Steam, Official Site] should arrive on Linux with the next big update, the developer has said.
  • BROKE PROTOCOL is like a low-poly GTA Online and it's coming to Linux
    BROKE PROTOCOL [Steam], a low-poly open-world action game that's a little like GTA Online and it's coming to Linux.
  • The Internet Archive Just Uploaded a Bunch of Playable, Classic Handheld Games
    The non-profit Internet Archive is perhaps best known for its Wayback Machine that takes snap shots of web sites so you can see what they looked like in the past. However, it also has a robust side project where it emulates and uploads old, outdated games that aren’t being maintained anymore. Recently, the organization added a slew of a unique kind of game that’s passed into memory: handheld LCD electronic games. The games–like Mortal Kombat, depicted above–used special LCD screens with preset patterns. They could only display the exact images in the exact place that they were specified for. This meant the graphics were incredibly limited and each unit could only play the one game it was designed to play. A Game Boy, this was not.
  • Internet Archive emulator brings dozens of handheld games back from obscurity
    Over the weekend, the Internet Archive announced it was offering a new series of emulators. This time, they’re designed to mimic one of gaming’s most obscure artifacts — handheld games. When I say a “handheld game,” I don’t mean the Game Boy or the PSP — those are handheld consoles. These are single-game handheld or tabletop devices that look and feel more like toys. The collection includes the very old, mostly-forgotten games sold in mini-handhelds from the 80s onward.

Linux Foundation Videos and Projects

LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, this weekend at MIT, March 24-25

This weekend, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) present the tenth annual LibrePlanet free software conference in Cambridge, March 24-25, 2018, at MIT. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels. LibrePlanet's tenth anniversary theme is "Freedom Embedded." Embedded systems are everywhere, in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies. We've come to expect that proprietary software's sinister aspects are embedded in software, digital devices, and our lives, too: we expect that our phones monitor our activity and share that data with big companies, that governments enforce digital restrictions management (DRM), and that even our activity on social Web sites is out of our control. This year's talks and workshops will explore how to defend user freedom in a society reliant on embedded systems. Read more Also: FSF Blogs: Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: March 23rd starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC