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Programming: ThreadStack and Qt for WebAssembly

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  • ThreadStack: Yet Another C++ Project Trying To Make Multi-Threading Easier

    ThreadStack is yet another C++ project trying to make it easier dealing with multiple CPU threads.

    This latest open-source C++ threading project comes out of academia research. ThreadStack is self-described by its developer, Erkam Murat Bozkurt, as "an innovative software which produces a class library for C++ multi-thread programming and the outcome of the ThreadStack acts as an autonomous management system for the thread synchronization tasks. ThreadStack has a nice and useful graphical user interface and includes a short tutorial and code examples. ThreadStack offers a new way for multi-thread computing and it uses a meta program in order to produce an application specific thread synchronization library." Erkam has been working the rounds trying to raise awareness for this research on the GCC and LLVM mailing lists.

  • Beta for Qt for WebAssembly Technology Preview

    WebAssembly is a bytecode format intended to be executed in a web browser. This allows an application to be deployed to a device with a compliant web browser without going through any explicit installation steps. The application will be running inside a secure sandbox in the web browser, making it appropriate for applications that do not need full access to the device capabilities, but benefits from a swift and uncomplicated installation process.

  • Qt for WebAssembly Tech Preview Reaches Beta

    As part of next month's Qt 5.11 tool-kit update, a new technology preview module will be WebAssembly support for running Qt5 user-interfaces within your web-browser.

Exploring Contributors Centrality Over Time

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Development
KDE

At the end of my previous post we concluded with yet another question. Indeed, on the 2017 KDEPIM contributor network we found out that Christian Mollekopf while being a very consistent committer didn't appear as centrality as we would expect. Yet from the topology he seemed to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality. This time we'll try to look into this and figure out what might be going on.

My first attempt at this was to try to look into the contributor network on a different time period and see how it goes. If we take two snapshots of the network for the two semesters of 2017, how would it look? Well, easy to do with my current scripts so let's see!

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What is Open Source Programming? How to Get Involved?

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Open Source Programming simply means writing codes that other people can freely use as well as modify. It is essential for authors to license their code, it enables them to have a copyright for those codes. Therefore, for a code to be declared safe and free for all to use, whether it’s available in the Github or in a public-repo; the author is required to license their own code. This is to avoid cases of individuals being sued by the author for using, modifying or even embedding the code without being granted a license to do that.

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​Learn to use GitHub, ​GitHub Releases Atom 1.26

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  • ​Learn to use GitHub with GitHub Learning Lab

    The most popular open-source development site in the world is GitHub. It's used by tens of millions of developers to work on over 80 million projects.

    It's not just a site where people use Linus Torvalds' Git open-source distributed version control system. It's also an online home for collaboration, a sandbox for testing, a launchpad for deployment, and a platform for learning new skills. The GitHub Training Team has now released an app, GitHub Learning Lab, so you can join the programming party.

    GitHub Learning Lab is not a tutorial or webcast. It's an app that gives you a hands-on learning experience within GitHub. According to GitHub, "Our friendly bot will take you through a series of practical, fun labs that will give you the skills you need in no time--and share helpful feedback along the way."

  • Atom 1.26

    Atom 1.26 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, fuzzy-finder support for Teletype and file system watcher improvements.

  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets GitHub Package, Filesystem Watcher Improvements

    GitHub announced the release of the Atom 1.26 open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor for Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms with more improvements and bug fixes.

    In Atom 1.26, the GitHub package received various improvements and new features, among which we can mention the ability of the ’s Git pane to display a read-only list of recent commits for quick reference, and support for storing your GitHub username and password credentials in the Git authentication dialog.

Spyder – The Scientific Python IDE for Data Science

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Development

I don’t know how many of our readers are research scientists, data analysts, etc. but today, we introduce an IDE that is ideal for Python development and it goes by the name of Spyder.

Spyder is an Open Source IDE written in Python for Python development with a focus on research, data analysis, and scientific package creation. It boasts a well-planned User Interface with interactive options, customizable layouts, and toggle-able sections.

Its features include a multi-language editor with automatic code completion, real-time code analysis, go-to definitions, etc. It also contains a history log, developer tools, a documentation viewer, a variable explorer, and an interactive console, among other perks.

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Programming: nGraph Compiler, JavaScript Trademark, PyPI and Pip

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  • Intel Opens Up nGraph Source Code For DNN Model Compiler

    Intel tonight announced they are open-sourcing their nGraph compiler code, which serves as a framework-neutral deep neural network model compiler.

    Intel claims with nGraph and Xeon Scalable hardware that researchers can obtain up to 10x performance improvements over previous TensorFlow integrations, as one example. Besides TensorFlow, nGraph also supports PyTorch, MXNet, Neon, Caffe2, and CNTK while also planning to support other frameworks moving forward.

  • Why it's finally time to give up on the name JavaScript

    An iOS developer has apparently received a cease and desist notice from Oracle over the use of the word "JavaScript" in the title of their app. The developer, Tyanya Software, shared the notice on perennial internet soapbox Reddit to seek advice on how to fight the order.

    [...]

    If user reviews are any indication, the app is not even particularly good, with reviewers stating things such as "Not ready for production," "Does not work as advertised," and "Waste of money, don't buy this." The last update to the app was in 2014, which the changelog notes was only an upgrade to add support for iOS 8. The app developer is at least honest about the intent behind the unwieldy name for the app, saying in a Reddit comment that "we game the App Store ranking by adding all the keywords to the app name."

    While Oracle has a duty to protect their trademarks, this type of legal bludgeoning underscores a historical problem that has been left unaddressed for too long: JavaScript is a terrible name for the thing being described.

    It has nothing to do with Java, an actual product developed by Sun (now owned by Oracle). JavaScript was developed at Mozilla, and the name was changed during beta releases of Netscape Navigator 2.0 from "LiveScript" to "JavaScript." It has, for some time, caused confusion among casual web users about the difference between Java and JavaScript. Given that ECMAScript is also a trademarked term, it seems best to revert to calling the language "LiveScript" to undercut trademark-related legal posturing.

    [...]

    Oracle declined to comment on this story.

  • New PyPI launched

    The new PyPI has been launched. Browser traffic and API calls (including "pip install") have been redirected from the old pypi.python.org to the new site. The old PyPI will shut down on April 30. LWN covered the new PyPI last week.

  • Pip 10.0 has been released

    The release of pip 10.0 has been announced. Some highlights of this release include the removal of Python 2.6 support, limited PEP 518 support (with more to come), a new "pip config" command, and other improvements.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

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  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt

    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it.

    When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.

  • 6 Python datetime libraries

    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.

  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?

Programming/Development: That’s How C Does It, LLVM, Java EE

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  • This Week in Programming: That’s How C Does It

    I had grand ambitions this week. I’d come across a smattering of articles delving into the history of programming languages, practices, and other Internet-based tidbits. I’d pondered a pithy title like “if !mistake(history) do repeat” and dug through my source materials for evidence, but came up a bit empty-handed. In the end, the line that really summed up this week’s theme was found at the closing of an interesting article asking why does “=” mean assignment?

  • Intel Tremont CPU Support Added To LLVM's Clang Compiler

    Earlier this month Intel ISA documentation pointed to a new CPU micro-architecture codenamed "Tremont", we've seen a few kernel patches also referencing Intel Tremont, and now there is Tremont microarchitecture support for LLVM's Clang compiler.

  • SAP okays Java EE being Eclipsed, six months after Oracle's announcement

    SAP has revealed its attitude to Oracle’s decision to let go of Java EE and have it tended by the Eclipse Foundation.

    SAP’s position is simple: it’s cool with it.

    “The announcement of Oracle to handover stewardship of Java EE to the Eclipse foundation is a forward-looking process targeting future releases of the technology stack,” says the company’s “”stance” on the matter.

Programming: Subversion 1.10 and INN 2.6.2

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  • Apache Subversion 1.10 Release Notes

    Apache Subversion 1.10 is a superset of all previous Subversion releases, and is as of the time of its release considered the current "best" release. Any feature or bugfix in 1.0.x through 1.9.x is also in 1.10, but 1.10 contains features and bugfixes not present in any earlier release. The new features will eventually be documented in a 1.10 version of the free Subversion book (svnbook.red-bean.com).

  • Subversion 1.10 Released With LZ4 Compression, New Conflict Resolver

    For those still using Subversion for revision control system for cases like managing of large files or dealing with legacy code-bases, the Apache Subversion 1.10 release is now available.

    There is quite a bit of new work in Subversion 1.10 compared to previous versions of this VCS. Highlights include improved path-based authorization with better performance and wildcard support, a new interactive conflict resolver, LZ4 compression support, new client command-line options, and experimental shelving support.

  • INN 2.6.2

    In the feature department, this release adds a new syntaxchecks parameter to inn.conf that can be used to disable message ID syntax checking, better header sanitization support in mailpost, support for TLS 1.3, and support for using GnuPG v1 (which is unfortunately important for control messages and NoCeM on Usenet still).

Qt for Python

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  • Qt for Python is coming to a computer near you

    Some of you – ok, probably most of you – know that Qt is a great C++ framework, enabling developers to create magnificent user interfaces with technologies like QML, Qt Quick Controls, and Qt Widgets. I will further claim that no one is knocked out of their socks when I say that C++ is one of the most widely used programming languages in the world today. The fact that Python is one of the fastest growing programming languages, measured in popularity, is probably also old news in most communities. So, what’s this blog post all about? Well, give it two more minutes.

  • The Qt Company Has Been Overhauling Qt's Support For Python

    Following next month's release of Qt 5.11, The Qt Company will be introducing as a technology preview the new Qt for Python.

    Qt for Python is the re-branded and overhauled PySide2, the module providing Qt integration for the Python programming language.

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