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Go 1.10 and New PHP Builds for Fedora/Red Hat

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Development
  • Go 1.10 is released

    Happy Friday, happy weekend! Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.10. You can get it from the download page.

    See the Go 1.10 release notes for all the details.

  • Golang 1.10 Offers Many Smaller Changes, Restores NetBSD Support

    Not only is there a new Rust release this week but the Google developers have put out the Go 1.10 update.

    Go 1.10 ships with many minor feature additions and improvements with no big overhauls. Among the changes with Go 1.10 are automatic caching of build and test results, many other go tooling improvements, minor enhancements to the Gofmt formatting utility, and compiler toolchain updates.

  • PHP version 7.1.15RC1 and 7.2.3RC1

Jupyter and Junior Developers

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Development
  • Jupyter: notebooks for education and collaboration

    The popular interpreted language Python shares a mode of interaction with many other languages, from Lisp to APL to Julia: the REPL (read-eval-print-loop) allows the user to experiment with and explore their code, while maintaining a workspace of global variables and functions. This is in contrast with languages such as Fortran and C, which must be compiled and run as complete programs (a mode of operation available to the REPL-enabled languages as well). But using a REPL is a solitary task; one can write a program to share based on their explorations, but the REPL session itself not easily shareable. So REPLs have gotten more sophisticated over time, evolving into shareable notebooks, such as what IPython, and its more recent descendant, Jupyter, have. Here we look at Jupyter: its history, notebooks, and how it enables better collaboration in languages well beyond its Python roots.

  • Who Killed The Junior Developer?

    I’m not sure what the industry-wide solution is. I’m not sure whether companies that lack junior devs are unbalanced or smart. The reality is that most software developers don’t stay one place very long, so maybe it doesn’t make sense to invest a lot in training someone? Or maybe the industry should ask itself why people keep hopping jobs? Maybe it’s because a lot of them suck, or for a lot of us it’s the only way to advance our salary. I can either wait for a stupid, meaningless yearly “performance review” to bump me up 1% or take my resume and interview elsewhere and get 10% or more.

    It’s not just a sign that an individual company is broken, it’s a sign the entire industry is broken.

Programming/Development: BH 1.66.0-1, Data scientists, vi, Emacs and Compilers

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Development
  • BH 1.66.0-1

    A new release of the BH package arrived on CRAN a little earlier: now at release 1.66.0-1. BH provides a sizeable portion of the Boost C++ libraries as a set of template headers for use by R, possibly with Rcpp as well as other packages.

    This release upgrades the version of Boost to the Boost 1.66.0 version released recently, and also adds one exciting new library: Boost compute which provides a C++ interface to multi-core CPU and GPGPU computing platforms based on OpenCL.

  • Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

    The average salary offered to data scientists in the past year was £47,000, with Python being the most desirable programming language, according to an analysis of job ads.

    The assessment, carried out by listings site Joblift, looked at 8,672 data scientist vacancies posted in the UK over the last 12 months.

    It found that data science salaries have increased at 3 per cent a month, which is a percentage point higher than the UK job market as a whole.

  • Top 11 vi tips and tricks

    The vi editor is one of the most popular text editors on Unix and Unix-like systems, such as Linux. Whether you're new to vi or just looking for a refresher, these 11 tips will enhance how you use it.

  • How to create slides with Emacs Org mode and Reveal.js

    You've crafted each slide in your presentation. Now what? You'll want to generate the HTML version of your slide deck. To do that, press Ctrl+c Ctrl+e on your keyboard. This opens the Org mode export buffer. Next, type R+R. Emacs creates a single HTML file in the folder where you saved your slide file.

    Open that HTML file in a web browser. You can move through the slides by pressing the arrow keys on your keyboard.

  • Renesas Synergy Platform Boosts IoT Performance With IAR Systems Advanced Compiler Technology

Google Summer of Code 2018

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Development
Google
OSS

Qt 5.10.1 Released

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Development
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.10.1 is released today. As a patch release, Qt 5.10.1 does not add any new functionality but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.10.0, the new Qt 5.10.1 contains over 300 bug fixes and in total close to 1400 changes since Qt 5.10.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.10.1.

Read more

Getting started with the RStudio IDE

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Development

For as long as I can remember, I've been toying with numbers. As an undergraduate student in the late 1970s, I began taking statistics courses, learning ways to examine and analyze data to uncover some meaning.

Back then, I had a scientific calculator that made statistical calculations much easier than ever before. In the early '90s, as a graduate student in educational psychology working on t-tests, correlations, and ANOVA, I started doing my calculations by meticulously writing text files that were fed into an IBM mainframe. The mainframe was an improvement over my handheld calculator, but one minor spacing error rendered the whole process null and void, and the process was still somewhat tedious.

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Coding: Python 3.0, Java EE, and Licence Compliance

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Development
  • A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

    This year marks one decade since the release of Python 3. Red Hat's Victor Stinner who is also a CPython core developer provided a retrospective on Python 3 at last week's FOSDEM conference.

    It's been 10 years since Python 3 came about with its language changes and in 2018, there are still programs being made compatible with Python 3. Python 2.7 continues to be maintained until 2020.

  • Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won't be Java McJava Face)

    Unable to convince Oracle to allow the use of its trademarked term "Java" to refer to the open source version of Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE), the Eclipse Foundation is asking those who care about such things to vote on proposed names for the software project.

    Last summer, Oracle said it had begun working with the Eclipse Foundation and the Java EE community to transfer its Java EE code and governance responsibilities to the foundation.

    But Oracle is not giving up its intellectual property rights in the name "Java." And so for the past few months, the Java EE community has been puzzling over how to refer to the open source version of Java EE.

  • Open Source Audits in Merger and Acquisition Transactions: Get the Free Ebook

    Haddad also notes that open source audits can expose obligations. “Open source licenses usually impose certain obligations that must be fulfilled when code is distributed,” he notes. “One example is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL), which requires derivatives or combinations to be made available under the same license as well. Other licenses require certain notices in documentation or have restrictions for how the product is promoted.”

Mozilla Development

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Development
Moz/FF
  • Feasibility of low-level GPU access on the Web

    As the talks within WebGPU community group progress, it becomes apparent that the disagreements lie in more domains than simply technical. It’s about what the Web is today, and what we want it to become tomorrow.

  • Alternatives to vertical tabs

    For the longest time I've used vertical tabs in Firefox and I still find it odd that people don't use it more. It's a simple fact that a horizontal tab strip doesn't scale too well when you get lots of tabs.

  • Asking Questions

    Will posted a great article a couple weeks ago, Giving and Receiving Help at Mozilla. I have been meaning to write a similar article for a while now. His post finally pushed me over the edge.

    Be sure to read Will's post first. The rest of this article is an addendum to his post.

Programming/Development: AmplitudeJS, Python, and Buzzword 'DevOps'

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Development

Programming: Shell Scripting, Pair Programming, How Programmers Learn to Code, New RPMs of PHP

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Development
  • Shell Scripting: Dungeons, Dragons and Dice

    In my last article, I talked about a really simple shell script for a game called Bunco, which is a dice game played in rounds where you roll three dice and compare your values to the round number. Match all three and match the round number, and you just got a bunco for 25 points. Otherwise, any die that match the round are worth one point each. It's simple—a game designed for people who are getting tipsy at the local pub, and it also is easy to program.

  • Pair programming with git

    Git is great. It took the crown of version control systems in just a few years. Baked into the git model is that each commit has a committer and one author. Ofen this is the same person. What if there is more than one author for a commit? This is the case with pair programming or with mob programming or with any other way of collaboration where code is produced by more than one person. I talked about this at the git-merge conference last year. There are some workarounds but there is no native support in git yet.

    It seems that the predominant convention to express multi-authorship in git commits is to add a Co-authored-by entry in the commit message as a so-called trailer. This adds more flexibility than trying to tweak the author and committer fields and is quite widely accepted, especially by the git community.

  • How programmers learn to code

    In terms of how programmers learnt to code, self-teaching is the norm for developers of all ages, stated the report.

    “Even though 67% of developers have computer science degrees, roughly 74% said they were at least partially self-taught.”

    On average, developers know four languages, but they want to learn four more.

  • PHP version 7.1.14 and 7.2.2

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.2 are available in the remi-php72 repository for Fedora 25-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS) and as Software Collection in the remi-safe repository.

    RPM of PHP version 7.1.14 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Fedora 24-25 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

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