Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

GNOME 3.34’s Sleek New Desktop Background

Filed under
GNOME

The upcoming GNOME 3.34 release is sure to ship with a stack of improvements, new features and core app updates — but it will also come with a brand new default wallpaper!

GNOME designer Jakub Steiner is, once again, diligently designing a new desktop drape for the revered free desktop to use by default.

And although the intended design is not final-final, it’s almost done! So here’s your first look at the brand new GNOME 3.34 wallpaper...

Read more

Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

Read more

KDE and GNOME: Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo, KDE GSoC Projects, Kate & C++ Developer Survey and Sumaid Syed's GSoC Work on GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo

    With the completion of my first milestone for my GSoC project: Nextcloud Integration on Plasma Mobile, plasma mobile accounts settings now enables the users to add their nextcloud accounts via webview.

    Well! didn’t accounts setting already provide the method to add nextcloud/owncloud accounts? Yes, this functionality was already implemented by the owncloud plugin in kaccounts-providers project. Then, why did I re-implement the same thing?

    As I mentioned, now accounts can be added via webview.

  • First week of GSOC, Piece Table Implement

    Hi! Last week was start of the GSOC coding period. So I started my project. Also I opened my code on the KDE git. https://cgit.kde.org/scratch/songeon/kmarkdownparser.git/

    If you are interested in my project feel free to look and give me some advices.

  • KIOFuse: 32-bit Support

    The first two weeks of the GSoC coding period are now over.

    Firstly, a mapping between KIO errors and FUSE errors has now been established. Previously all KIO Job errors were simply sent back to FUSE as EIO, which isn’t entirely accurate. The mapping now provides more accurate error replies.

    A major new addition is 32-bit support. KIOFuse did not compile on 32-bit but these compilation errors have now been alleviated. They mostly stemmed from the fact that size_t has a different size on different architectures, and that file sizes should always be represented as off_t anyway.

  • Kate & C++ Developer Survey

    While browsing the ISO C++ homepage I stumbled over the results PDF of the Second Annual C++ Foundation Developer Survey “Lite”.

    I was astonished that Kate made it into the “Which development environments (IDEs) or editors do you use for C++ development?” results.

    ;=) Seems not only I use it as my normal editor for working on C++ code.

  • Sumaid Syed: First Two Weeks

    Jean Felder ( My mentor for GSoC project) and Marinus Schraal (GNOME Music Maintainer) suggested that I propose a plan of the whole project. Now trust me! This is the much more difficult than actual coding!
    I usually work on my personal projects and start working from scratch, but here the project involves so many different libraries, so I really struggled with making a plan with a proper timeline.

  • What is my Project?

    In this case, all we need to do is extract those mbids and store them in tracker. Tracker is a file indexing and search framework, which GNOME Music relies on. Hence it’s necessary to extract and index mbids in tracker from file.

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Dashes and Gnome-gitg Split View

Filed under
GNOME
  • Okay Dash to Panel, That Does Looks Super Slick…

    I haven’t used a Windows desktop “properly” for around 8 years or so (and can’t say I miss it, either).

    Back when I first started this blog I had a multi-boot set up on my PC that married a (seemingly endless) stack of Linux distros with a version (I forget which) of Windows 7.

    — Why am I talking about Windows 7?

    Well, because one of the things I really remember being quite “cool” about it — please note: I use the term loosely — was a feature called Aero Peek.

  • Gnome-gitg Split View feature progress. [GSoC]

    Introducing split view in gitg is comprised of small small tasks just like any other software feature requires.

    One such task is:- Gitg should be able to detect binaries and images diffs if these are in the diffs then split-view simply does not makes sense.

    [...]

    Dash to Panel is one of the best GNOME extensions available IMO. In one stroke it changes the GNOME Shell desktop experience in to a more traditional layout.

    Both the Dash to Panel and code-cousin Dash to Dock GNOME extensions offer a window preview feature similar to Aero Peek. It’s an optional setting, but it’s there; it’s not new.

GNOME: Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Picks GNOME MPV, GTK 3 Frame Profiler, and Ubuntu's Reason for Staying Behind GNOME's Latest

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Why Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Is Ditching VLC for GNOME MPV

    GNOME MPV (now known as Celluloid) will be the default media player in Ubuntu MATE 19.10.

    The app supplants the versatile VLC meda player, which the MATE-desktop-toting distro has shipped with since a community poll back in 2017.

    So why the change now?

    Better desktop integration. That’s according to Ubuntu MATE’s Martin Wimpress who revealed news of the swap in the latest Ubuntu MATE monthly update on Patreon:

    “We will be dropping VLC from the pre-installed applications and shipping GNOME MPV instead. GNOME MPV will soon be renamed to Celluloid. The reasons for switching to GNOME MPV are similar to swapping out Thunderbird for Evolution; better desktop integration.”

    Size is another factor. GNOME MPV takes up a comparatively svelte 27MB on the ISO image, whereas Qt5-based VLC requires closer to 70MB.

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Is Ditching VLC for GNOME MPV
  •  

  • GTK 3 Frame Profiler

    I back-ported the GTK 4 frame-profiler by Matthias to GTK 3 today. Here is an example of a JavaScript application using GJS and GTK 3. The data contains mixed native and JS stack-traces along with compositor frame information from gnome-shell.

  • Ubuntu keeping up with GNOME stable updates

    Recently Michael blogged about epiphany being outdated in Ubuntu. While I don’t think that a blog ranting was the best way to handle the problem (several of the Ubuntu Desktop members are on #gnome-hackers for example, it would have been easy to talk to us there) he was right that the Ubuntu package for epiphany was outdated.

    [...]

    Again the reality is a bit more complex. Snaps don’t have depends like debs do, so by nature they don’t have problems like being blocked by missing depends. To limit duplication we do provide a gnome platform snap though and most of our GNOME snaps use it. That platform snap is built from our LTS archive which is on GTK 3.22 and our snaps are built on a similar infrastructure.

    [...]

    And as a conclusion, if as an upstream or user you have an issue with a component that is still outdated in Ubuntu feel free to get in touch with us (IRC/email/launchpad) and we will do out best to fix the situation.

  •  

KDE and GNOME: Digital Atelier/Krita, Akademy 2019 and GNOME/Mutter Accessibility

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Digital Atelier: Painter Brushes and Video Tutorials Now 50% Off

    To celebrate the new release, we’re doing a 50% off sale of Digital Atelier, Ramon Miranda’s painterly brushes and tutorials pack for the rest of this month! Get Digital Atelier in the Krita shop!

  • Akademy 2019 registration now open

    Once you have registered, take a look at our guide on how to travel to Milan and check out the accommodation we have arranged and recommend for attendees. We also have a guide on how to get from different locations within Milan to Akademy. This guide also includes information on how to move around the city in general -- useful for sightseeing!

    IMPORTANT: All attendees are expected to read and required to follow Akademy's Code of Conduct.

  • GNOME 3.34's Mutter Adds Mouse Accessibility Support For X11/Wayland

    Up to now the GNOME desktop has offered mouse accessibility support using the long-standing Mousetweaks program that allows for different actions to take place all from the lone input device for those that may be limited to manipulating only one button or other limitations around this primary input device. But GNOME's Mousetweaks only works with X11 so now Mutter has picked up mouse accessibility support itself that works on both X11 and Wayland sessions.

GNOME and KDE: Argos, Konsole and ask.krita.org

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Argos Is Like BitBar For Gnome Shell: It Shows Scripts Output On The Panel (Top Bar)

    Searching for a way to show a script output on the Gnome Shell panel (top bar), I came across Argos. This Gnome Shell extension does only one thing: it adds a new item with a dropdown menu to the panel, showing the output from a script and exposing functionality.

    The extension is inspired by BitBar, a popular program to put the output from any script on the macOS menu bar, and it's even compatible with most BitBar scripts.

  • Hello new Konsole

    Konsole has been ready for many many years, and got almost 10 years without anything really exciting being added, mostly because the software is ready, why should we modify something that works to add experimental features?

    But then the reality kicked in, konsole missed some features that are quite nice and existed in Terminator, Tilix and other new terminals, but Tilix now lacks a developer, and Terminator is also not being actively developed (with the last release being it in 26 of February of 2017)

  • Retiring ask.krita.org

    About a year ago, we created the ask.krita.org website. We wanted to have a stack-exchange like place, where people could report problems, after searching whether their problems had already been discussed, where people could help each other.

    Maybe it was the platform we were using, maybe it’s that people who are using Krita have a different mindset from people for whom stack-exchange like sites work, but we came to realize that ask.krita.org did not work out.

  • Chrome 75 Released, ask.krita.org Website Retiring, LinuxGizmos Publishes Its Spring 2019 SBC Catalog, LibreOffice 6.3 Beta 1 Is Ready for Testing and Happy 15th to Phoronix

    The ask.krita.org website, a stack-exchange-like place for people to report problems and help each other, is being retired. According to the post, the problems were "Nobody seemed to be searching whether their problems had already been discussed and maybe solved, so the same questions were being asked again and again. Nobody seemed to stay around and engage with the people who were trying to help them, and nobody seemed to stay around to help other people." The team is looking for a replacement, but isn't sure quite what that will be yet.

How to stream music with GNOME Internet Radio

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

Internet radio is a great way to listen to stations from all over the world. Like many developers, I like to turn on a station as I code. You can listen to internet radio with a media player for the terminal like MPlayer or mpv, which is what I use to listen via the Linux command line. However, if you prefer using a graphical user interface (GUI), you may want to try GNOME Internet Radio, a nifty plugin for the GNOME desktop. You can find it in the package manager.

Listening to internet radio with a graphical desktop operating system generally requires you to launch an application such as Audacious or Rhythmbox. They have nice interfaces, plenty of options, and cool audio visualizers. But if you want a simple, straightforward interface that gets your streams playing, GNOME Internet Radio is for you.

Read more

Running NVIDIA On GNOME's X.Org Session May Get A Lot Smoother

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Canonical's Daniel van Vugt continues doing a lot of interesting performance investigations and optimizations around improving the experience of GNOME not only for Ubuntu but the upstream components. His latest focus has been on NVIDIA enhancements and now for the X.Org session there is a merge request pending to provide for a smoother experience.

This week Van Vugt opened up a pull request that provides a "significant improvement" to the frame-rate smoothness for NVIDIA's proprietary Linux graphics driver running on GNOME under the X.Org session (this MR doesn't affect the Wayland session).

Read more

Richard Hughes: Breaking apart Dell UEFI Firmware CapsuleUpdate packages

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
GNOME

When firmware is uploaded to the LVFS we perform online checks on it. For example, one of the tests is looking for known badness like embedded UTF-8/UTF-16 BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY strings. As part of this we use CHIPSEC (in the form of chipsec_util -n uefi decode) which searches the binary for a UEFI volume header which is a simple string of _FVH and then decompresses the volumes which we then read back as component shards. This works well on plain EDK2 firmware, and the packages uploaded by Lenovo and HP which use IBVs of AMI and Phoenix. The nice side effect is that we can show the user what binaries have changed, as the vendor might have accidentally forgotten to mention something in the release notes.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Developers Devising Plan To Ship Newer NVIDIA Drivers On Ubuntu Stable Releases

Currently NVIDIA's packaged drivers on Ubuntu can get a bit stale on Ubuntu stable releases since they aren't updated in-step with the latest driver releases. But a new stable release update (SRU) policy/exception similar to the Firefox approach is being made for Ubuntu so that new releases will end up working their way into currently supported Ubuntu series. The Canonical developers working on Ubuntu are really ramping up their support for NVIDIA's proprietary driver. On top of Ubuntu 19.10 to bundle the NVIDIA binary driver into the operating system's ISO image, they are working out the SRU details for shipping newer NVIDIA driver releases on existing Ubuntu stable releases. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Microsoft Warns about Worm Attacking Exim Servers on Azure [Ed: Microsoft should also warn "customers" of Windows back doors for the NSA, but it does not (this one was patched ages ago; the Microsoft back doors aren't). Shouldn't Microsoft ask its proxies and partners, as usual, to come up with buzzwords and logos and Web sites for bugs in FOSS, then talk about how FOSS is the end of the world?]
  • The Highly Dangerous 'Triton' [Attackers] Have Probed the US Grid [Ed: It's Windows]
     

    Over the past several months, security analysts at the Electric Information Sharing and Analysis Center (E-ISAC) and the critical-infrastructure security firm Dragos have been tracking a group of sophisticated [attackers] carrying out broad scans of dozens of US power grid targets, apparently looking for entry points into their networks. Scanning alone hardly represents a serious threat. But these [attackers], known as Xenotime—or sometimes as the Triton actor, after their signature malware—have a particularly dark history. The Triton malware was designed to disable the so-called safety-instrument systems at Saudi Arabian oil refinery Petro Rabigh in a 2017 cyberattack, with the apparent aim of crippling equipment that monitors for leaks, explosions, or other catastrophic physical events. Dragos has called Xenotime "easily the most dangerous threat activity publicly known."

  • A Researcher Found a Bunch of Voting Machine Passwords Online
    A little more than a week ago, the Department of Homeland Security confirmed that it was going to forensically analyze computer equipment associated with part of the 2016 elections in North Carolina in association with questions about Russian hacking. The news prompted an information security researcher to announce that he’d found evidence of other election security issues in North Carolina last fall, which he’d kept quiet until now. Chris Vickery, the director of cyber-risk research at UpGuard, a cybersecurity services firm, tweeted June 7 that he had found an unlocked online repository that contained what he said were passwords for touchscreen voting machines. The repository, he said, also contained other information, including serial numbers for machines that had modems, which theoretically could have allowed them to connect to the internet. Vickery said that after he found the open repository in September 2018, he immediately told state officials, who locked the file. State officials have told Mother Jones that the passwords were nearly 10 years old and encrypted—a claim disputed by Vickery and a Democratic technology consultant in North Carolina—but admitted that the file shouldn’t have been publicly available online.
  • TPM now stands for Tiny Platform Module: TCG shrinks crypto chip to secure all the Things [Ed: Misusing the word "trust" to obliterate computer freedom and general-purpose computing]
    The Trusted Computing Group (TCG), a nonprofit developing hardware-based cybersecurity tools, has started work on the "world's tiniest" Trusted Platform Module (TPM). TPMs are silicon gizmos designed to protect devices by verifying the integrity of essential software – like firmware and BIOS − and making sure no dodgy code has been injected into the system prior to boot. These are widely used to protect servers. Now TCG wants to adopt the technology for devices that are so small that the inclusion of a full TPM chip might be impractical due to cost, space and power considerations. The first tiny TPM prototype, codenamed Radicle, was demonstrated last week at a TCG members' meeting in Warsaw, Poland. [...] We have to mention that for years, TCG and its TPMs were criticised by the open-source software community, which suspected the tech could be used for vendor lock-in – GNU father Richard Stallman called trusted computing "treacherous computing", but it looks like his worst fears have not come to pass. That doesn't mean TPMs haven't seen their share of dark days: back in 2017, it emerged that security chips made by Infineon contained a serious flaw, with experts estimating that 25 to 30 per cent of all TPMs used globally were open to attack.
  • What Is a Buffer Overflow
    A buffer overflow vulnerability occurs when you give a program too much data. The excess data corrupts nearby space in memory and may alter other data. As a result, the program might report an error or behave differently. Such vulnerabilities are also called buffer overrun. Some programming languages are more susceptible to buffer overflow issues, such as C and C++. This is because these are low-level languages that rely on the developer to allocate memory. Most common languages used on the web such as PHP, Java, JavaScript or Python, are much less prone to buffer overflow exploits because they manage memory allocation on behalf of the developer. However, they are not completely safe: some of them allow direct memory manipulation and they often use core functions that are written in C/C++.
  • Any iPhone can be hacked
    Apple’s so called secure iPhones can be turned over by US coppers using a service promoted by an Israeli security contractor. Cellebrite publicly announced a new version of its product known as a Universal Forensic Extraction Device or UFED, one that it's calling UFED Premium. In marketing that update, it says that the tool can now unlock any iOS device cops can lay their hands on, including those running iOS 12.3. Cellebrite claims UFED Premium can extract files from many recent Android phones as well, including the Samsung Galaxy S9 but no-one ever called them secure and safe. What is unusual is that Cellebrite is making  broad claims about turning over Apple gear. This is not a cat-and-mouse claim where they exploit a tiny flaw which one day might be fixed. It would appear that Cellebrite has its paw on a real howler.
  • Cellebrite Claims It Can Unlock ‘Any’ iPhone And iPad, 1.4 Billion Apple Devices Hackable
    Israel-based Cellebrite has announced a new version of its system Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED) — UFED Premium — which is capable of unlocking any iPhone, high-end Android device, or an iPad. The forensics company has suggested that UFED Premium is meant to help the police in unlocking iPhones and Android smartphones and getting data from locked smartphones.
  • Web-based DNA sequencers getting compromised through old, unpatched flaw
    DnaLIMS is developed by Colorado-based dnaTools. It provides software tools for processing and managing DNA sequencing requests. These tools use browsers to access a UNIX-based web server on the local network, which is responsible for managing all aspects of DNA sequencing. A simple Google search shows that dnaLIMS is used by a number of scientific, academic and medical institutions.
  • Generrate Cryptographically Secure RANDOM PASSWORD
  • DMARC, mailing list, yahoo and gmail
    Gmail was blocking one person’s email via our list (he sent that using Yahoo and from his iPhone client), and caused more than 1700 gmail users in our list in the nomail block unless they check for the mailman’s email and click to reenable their membership. I panicked for a couple of minutes and then started manually clicking on the mailman2 UI for each user to unblock them. However, that was too many clicks. Suddenly I remembered the suggestion from Saptak about using JavaScript to do this kind of work. Even though I tried to learn JavaScript 4 times and failed happily, I thought a bit searching on Duckduckgo and search/replace within example code can help me out.
  • Tired of #$%& passwords? Single Sign-on could be savior

    So how is single sign-on more secure, if Facebook is in charge? It's not, say security experts. "They’ve shown they can’t be trusted with our information," says Rudis.

  • Are SSO Buttons Like “Sign-in With Apple” Better Than Passwords?
    Apple recently announced a new product that could prevent users from giving away their email ID to every other site on the internet. It’s expected to launch sometime later in 2019. Called “Sign-in with Apple,” it is similar to other Single Sign-on services provided by Google and Facebook. The button lets you login to websites without creating a new user account every time.
  • App Makers Are Mixed on ‘Sign In With Apple’

    But other app makers have mixed feelings on what Apple has proposed. I spoke to a variety of developers who make apps for iOS and Android, one of whom asked to remain anonymous because they aren’t authorized to speak on behalf of their employer. Some are skeptical that Sign In with Apple will offer a solution dramatically different from what’s already available through Facebook or Google. Apple’s infamous opacity around new products means the app makers don’t have many answers yet as to how Apple’s sign in mechanism is going to impact their apps. And one app maker went as far as referring to Apple’s demand that its sign-in system be offered if any other sign-in systems are shown as “petty.”

  • Chinese Cyberattack Hits Telegram, App Used by Hong Kong Protesters

    “This case was not an exception,” he wrote.

    The Hong Kong police made their own move to limit digital communications. On Tuesday night, as demonstrators gathered near Hong Kong’s legislative building, the authorities arrested the administrator of a Telegram chat group with 20,000 members, even though he was at his home miles from the protest site.

  • Security News This Week: Telegram Says China Is Behind DDoS

    As protests erupted in the streets of Hong Kong this week, over a proposed law that would allow criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China, the secure messaging app Telegram was hit with a massive DDoS attack. The company tweeted on Wednesday that it was under attack. Then the app’s founder and CEO Pavel Durov followed up and suggested the culprits were Chinese state actors. He tweeted that the IP addresses for the attackers were coming from China. “Historically, all state actor-sized DDoS (200-400 Gb/s of junk) we experienced coincided in time with protests in Hong Kong (coordinated on @telegram). This case was not an exception,” he added. As Reuters notes, Telegram was DDoSed during protests in China in 2015, as well. Hong Kong does not face the strict [Internet] censorship that exists in mainland China, although activists have expressed concern about increased pressure from Beijing on the region.

  • Nextcloud signs public letter, opposing German plan to force decryption of chat

10 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software for Linux Users

Mind maps are diagrams used to organize information visually in hierarchical ways that show relationships among the elements that make up the map. Drawing mind maps have been proven to be highly effective for getting information in and out of the brain especially when combined with logical note-taking that typically details or summarizes the roles of the map’s components along the way. There are various mind mapping software out there ranging from free to paid to open source options. Today, my job is to list the best mind mapping software available to users for free. They are all modern, easy enough to use, and offer sufficient consumer support. Read more

today's howtos