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GNOME

ColorTint Adds Translucent Overlay To Help People with Dyslexia, Scopic Sensitivity

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GNOME

For people with dyslexia, scopic sensitivity, and related conditions, GNOME has an extension to adds a a translucent colored overlay over your desktop that may help.

It’s ‘ColorTint’ that adds an indicator applet in system tray area. User may click the drop down menu options to enable/disable the overlay, change the color via RGB slider bar, and adjust transparency via the Alpha slider.

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13 Best Dark GTK Themes for Your Linux Desktop

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GNOME

With the near infinite customization options you have on any given Linux distribution, the most visually noticeable difference is customizing the theme. Let’s take a look at some of the GTK themes with dark mode.

Yeah, we have covered the best Linux themes in the past but this one is specifically dedicated to the dark themes. There was a time when only programmers and sysadmins preferred dark mode but that’s not the case anymore. Dark mode is loved by normal people as well and hence I compiled this list of dark themes for desktop Linux users like you.

[...]

McMojave is a GTK theme which takes inspiration from the macOS style user interface. This theme is offered in dark mode, obviously, but also in light mode, for… umm… whoever may want it.

The McMojave GTK theme obviously supports GTK based Desktop Environments like Pantheon, Gnome, XFCE, Mate etc; but, this theme is also available for KDE users.

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13 Best Dark GTK Themes for Your Linux Desktop

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GNOME

Yeah, we have covered the best Linux themes in the past but this one is specifically dedicated to the dark themes. There was a time when only programmers and sysadmins preferred dark mode but that’s not the case anymore. Dark mode is loved by normal people as well and hence I compiled this list of dark themes for desktop Linux users like you.

If you are new to theme-ing your desktop environment, you can take a look at our guide to install themes in GNOME.

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This GTK App Checks Contrast Ratio Between 2 Colors in Ubuntu Linux

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Software
GNOME

Designers and website developers may sometimes need to check WCAG color contrast to make web content more accessible to people with disabilities.

Without using an online website each time, Linux has a stylish GTK4 app “Contrast” which allows to check whether the contrast between two colors meet the WCAG requirements.

The app has a simple user interface that displays one color as background and another as font color of the text. By clicking on the double arrow icon between two color codes, it reverses background color as text font and font color as background.

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The Top 8 Features of the GNOME Desktop Environment

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GNOME

GNOME is one of the oldest and most popular interfaces for free and open-source operating systems like Linux. But modern GNOME looks nothing like its origins, and it has evolved into one of the best ways to use a computer.

Whether you’re already using Linux or curious why you might want to make the switch, here are some of the best features of GNOME.

[...]

On GNOME, the panel at the top does not contain any app launchers. This panel is small and black, like on a phone or tablet, and is lately static. It contains the date and time, a few system indicators in the top right, an Activities button in the top left, and the name of the currently running app next to that.

You click that Activities button when you want to do anything unrelated to the currently open app. Otherwise, there’s little on-screen to distract you from what you're doing.

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How To Survive GNOME With GNOME Extensions

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GNOME

When you start as a Linux User, you are very likely to fall in two camps. Either you are a GNOME user, or a KDE user, whether it was by choice or by default. So you already know you won’t be missing any fanboy-ism or any flamewar in the Linux community. Since a good chunk of Linux users are tinkerers, we end up with a lot of experiments: different distros, different desktops, different bootloaders, different everything. I personally think it’s very healthy, even if it goes against having a consistent experience across the board. This is what happens when users are able to modify and tweak every piece of the system. It’s an inherent property of its original design.

Of course, you can avoid the GNOME vs KDE war by using something completely different altogether, like a tiler i3, awesomevm or other alternatives… or just use both GNOME and KDE and recognize that they both have some merits.

These days I tend to find myself more at home in KDE than in GNOME, but I still use GNOME on one of my machines – it moved recently to GNOME 41. Out of the box I’m in the camp that GNOME defaults are not for me, making it barely usable. Thankfully there’s the wonderful world of GNOME Extensions to make it possible to live in GNOME, keeping the good bits and ironing out the bad ones with Extensions. I won’t go at length on how to install extensions, suffice to say that you simply need the above link and a browser plugin (available for Firefox and Chromium/Chrome) if you like it the easy way.

So, here is what I recommend if you feel a little lost by the lack of customization or options in Vanilla GNOME. I will split my recommended extensions into three parts: Essential, Important, and Nice to have.

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Gnome Next Meeting Applet Shows Your Next Google Calendar Events On The Panel

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GNOME

Gnome Next Meeting Applet is an AppIndicator that shows your next Google Calendar meetings / events in a menu on the panel. It also shows your next Google Calendar event title and remaining time directly on the panel, so you can quickly find out when your next event / meeting is due.

The applet makes use of Gnome Online Accounts to grab your Google Calendar info, and has useful features like the ability to automatically detect video conference URLs (it supports Google Meet, Zoom and Bluejeans), allowing you to click on a meeting to join it. The application also shows the document links attached to the current meeting.

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How To Install Guix System with GNOME on a Virtual Machine

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GNOME
HowTos

This tutorial explains step by step how to install Guix Operating System with GNOME desktop on a virtual machine. We will use the user friendly AQEMU, thus you can exercise this too with another tools if you want. This tutorial can be viewed as a beginner's guide for you who want to try out computing with Guix. By this, we hope you find installing Guix Desktop is reasonably easier compared to any other source code based operating systems. Welcome to GNU system!

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Martín Abente Lahaye: Flatseal 1.7.5

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GNOME

A new Flatseal release is out [...] Starting with the visuals, @BrainBlasted replaced the custom widgets, used in the applications list, for proper libhandy’s widgets. Plus, he fixed a small styling detail to make applications icons look sharper!

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KGX – Minimal Terminal Emulator Aims to be Core App for GNOME & Phosh

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GNOME

KGX is a simple and user-friendly terminal emulator for GNOME. It aims to be a “Core” app for GNOME and Phosh, graphical shell for mobile devices like Purism’s Librem 5.

Rather than replacing GNOME Terminal, it’s on target to serve casual Linux user who rarely needs a terminal to carry out simple command line tasks. Via libhandy library, the terminal adjusts nicely to small screen sizes and for touch usage.

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More in Tux Machines

System Monitoring Center is an Ideal Task Manager & Resource Monitor for Linux

Graphically monitoring the system resources may not be the best experience on Linux. The system monitoring tool that comes baked in with your desktop environment might limit the details. For instance, GNOME’s system monitor does not display the CPU frequency and temperatures. In addition, the default system monitor applications available for Linux usually aim for simplicity instead of providing detailed insights. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How Ubuntu Boosts Developer Desktop Productivity | Ubuntu

    Seventeen years after its first release, Ubuntu is firmly established as the Linux developer desktop of choice around the world. From education through to enterprise, Ubuntu delivers the tools developers need to succeed across their careers. In this blog, we will cover the main aspects that contribute to this success. [...] Developers start their careers with Ubuntu, and 69% of student developers reported that they prefer Ubuntu as an OS. It’s not surprising. With Ubuntu, they gain access to the best of open source, including AI/ML frameworks, such as Pytorch and TensorFlow, ROS for robotics and LXD and multipass for virtualisation. Open source technology is now a critical part of any enterprise, and familiarity with open source is a key consideration in hiring. As a result, getting new developers onboarded and productive quickly is easier with Ubuntu. It’s a system they’re familiar with. It’s flexible and customisable. And, as an operating system, it spans both the workstation and the cloud, providing a consistent development experience across your technology stack.

  • Our 12 favorite Arduino UNO projects | Arduino Blog

    The UNO wasn’t Arduino’s first board, and it won’t be its last. There have been many varieties of microcontroller and maker boards before and after the UNO, but none have been as iconic. As we cross the epic milestone of 10 million UNOs sold and the launch of the UNO Mini Limited Edition, we decided it was time to take a look back at some of our favorite UNO projects from the last 10 years. And we want to hear about yours, too. Join us over on social media to share your favorite UNO projects, whether you built them yourself or marveled at someone else’s electronic creation.

  • Personal computer maker Raspberry Pi plans London listing

    The company behind Britain's best-selling personal computer is preparing the ground for a spring listing which is expected to value it at more than £370m.

    The trading arm of the Raspberry Pi Foundation has hired bankers from Stifel and Liberum to advise on a London float after securing a $45m (£33m) investment in September.

    The Cambridge-based foundation offloaded stakes to Lansdowne Partners and the Ezrah Charitable Trust to fund product development and marketing after seeing booming demand for its miniature personal computers during lockdown.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: Mozilla files comments on UK Data Protection Consultation

    Mozilla recently submitted its comments to a public consultation on reforming the UK’s data protection regime launched by the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport. With the public consultation, titled ‘Data: A New Direction’, the UK government set out to re-evaluate the UK’s approach to data protection after no longer being bound by the bloc’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). We took this opportunity to share our thoughts on data stewardship and the role effective regulation can play in addressing the lopsided power dynamics between large data collectors and users. For Mozilla, privacy is not optional. It is an integral aspect of our Manifesto, which states that individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional. This is why privacy is at the core of our product work and why we have long promoted robust data protection in our policy and advocacy work. Further, Mozilla’s Data Futures Lab is exploring alternative approaches to data governance and promoting data stewardship through original research and support to builders.

  • 42 things I learned from building a production database

    In 2017, I went to Facebook on a sabbatical from my faculty position at Yale. I created a team to build a storage system called Delos at the bottom of the Facebook stack (think of it as Facebook’s version of Chubby). We hit production with a 3-person team in less than a year; and subsequently scaled the team to 30+ engineers spanning multiple sub-teams. In the four years that I led the team (until Spring 2021), we did not experience a single severe outage (nothing higher than a SEV3). The Delos design is well-documented in two academic papers (in OSDI 2020 and SOSP 2021). Delos is currently replacing all uses of ZooKeeper at Facebook.

    Here are some of the things I learned as the tech lead for Delos. My intent in publishing this is to help others in similar roles (leading teams that are building new infra at large companies); much of it may not generalize to different settings.

Audiocasts/Show: Steam Deck, Open Source Security, WP Briefing, and Linux Action News

LVFS and OpenZFS

  • Richard Hughes: Firmware “Best Known Configuration” in fwupd

    I’ve just deployed some new functionality to the LVFS adding support for component <tag>s. These are used by server vendors to identify a known-working (or commercially supported) set of firmware on the machine. This is currently opt-in for each vendor to avoid the UI clutter on the components view, and so if you’re a vendor reading this post and realize you want this feature, let me know and it’s two clicks on the admin panel.

  • FWUPD Linux Firmware Updater Prepares "Best Known Configuration" Feature - Phoronix

    The Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) and FWUPD on their great upward trajectory has in recent times been expanding beyond their initial focus of desktop/laptop hardware to supporting more server platforms for firmware updating. The latest feature driven by their growing server interests is "best known configuration" handling for where there are multiple independently-versioned firmware packages for a given system and may be support recommendations or potential version conflicts between the the different firmware packages.

  • OpenZFS 3.0 Introduced at Developer Summit

    The ninth annual OpenZFS Developer Summit took place November 8th and 9th online with iXsystems proudly returning as a Gold sponsor. The OpenZFS community remains vibrant and is continuing to develop features at a rapid pace. This blog summarizes some of the more interesting talks.