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GNOME

Desktops: Cinnamon, KDE and GNOME

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GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Call For Testing: Cinnamon 4

    As always, please raise a ticket if you found any issue with the build script or if you have any suggestion to improve the experience with Cinnamon Desktop.

  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 27th, 2018

    We will be holding a Bug Day on November 27th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

    This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!

  • Desktop icons RC release

    So it’s finally here, desktop icons release candidate for 1.0 is available now!

    This means that all the features we wanted for 1.0 are implemented and we freeze the implementation of new features. Now we will focus on polishing and removing noisy or unnecessary stuff in the UI, fix weird behaviours and UX, fix bugs, etc.

    [...]

    Nautilus desktop icons has never worked well in multimonitor setups. Files get stuck hidden in some not reachable places due to the nature of Nautilus that simply puts a big window as the desktop, instead of a window per monitor.

    This extension finally implements a sane multimonitor handling, by having a flexible grid per monitor. No more lost data…

    Also, as you might know, the Nautilus desktop icons was Xorg only. This extension is by nature Wayland ready.

GNOME 3.32 Mutter Should Perform A Lot Better For DisplayLink/USB-Display Type Setups

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GNOME

An improvement was merged today to GNOME's Mutter compositor / window manager that should allow it to perform much better in multi-GPU setups, particularly for scenarios where the display is driven via a USB-based DisplayLink adapter.

The change to Mutter's renderer code uses Cogl for the CPU copy path rather than the OpenGL glreadPixels() function. Plus it adds some pixel format conversion tables between DRM and Cogl formats.

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Unite Shell: Making GNOME Shell More Like Ubuntu's Unity

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

If you are/were a fan of Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment, Unite-Shell is one of the most promising efforts to date for making the current GNOME 3 stack more like Unity.

The Unite Shell is an extension to GNOME Shell for configuring it to look just like Ubuntu's Unity 7. While it made waves a bit earlier this month, a Phoronix reader reported in over the weekend just how good it looks and works that it's worthy of an extra shout-out.

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Plata Is A New Gtk Theme Based On The Latest Material Design Refresh

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GNOME

Plata is a new Gtk+ theme based on the latest Material Design refresh. The theme comes in 3 variants, regular (mixed), Lumiere (light) and Noir (dark), each with regular and compact versions.

The theme, which mixes black, indigo and grey with bits of red and purple, supports Gtk+ 3.20.x, 3.22.x and 3.24.x, as well as Gtk+ 2, and a multitude of desktop environments like Gnome Shell (and Flashback), Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, LXDE, and Budgie Desktop.

Patheon (elementary OS), Unity 7 and "Gnome Shell customized by Canonical" (the Ubuntu session) are not officially supported by Plata theme. I've used Plata in Ubuntu 18.10 with Gnome Shell and I didn't notice any issues other than the theme GDM theme not being used, but this is only after about an hour of usage.

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GNOME 3.31.2 released

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.31.2 is now available. This is the second unstable development release leading to 3.32 stable series. Apologies that it's slightly late: there were some technical snafus.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.31.2, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of the dependencies on your host system...

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Also: GNOME 3.31.2 Desktop Released

GNOME Development Updates From Carlos Garnacho and Robert Ancell

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Carlos Garnacho: On the track for 3.32

    It happens sneakily, but there’s more things going on in the Tracker front than the occasional fallout. Yesterday 2.2.0-alpha1 was released, containing some notable changes.

    On and off during the last year, I’ve been working on a massive rework of the SPARQL parser. The current parser was fairly solid, but hard to extend for some of the syntax in the SPARQL 1.1 spec. After multiple attempts and failures at implementing property paths, I convinced myself this was the way forward.

  • Robert Ancell: Counting Code in GNOME Settings

    I've been spending a bit of time recently working on GNOME Settings. One part of this has been bringing some of the older panel code up to modern standards, one of which is making use of GtkBuilder templates.

    I wondered if any of these changes would show in the stats, so I wrote a program to analyse each branch in the git repository and break down the code between C and GtkBuilder.

KDE and GNOME: NVIDIA, Krita/Atelier and GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • NVIDIA Working On An EGLStreams Back-End For KDE On Wayland

    With no recent activity on the NVIDIA-led Unix device memory allocation work that all developer communities could get behind to supersede GBM and EGLStreams for use by Wayland compositors, NVIDIA is working on an EGLStreams back-end for KDE's KWin compositor.

    Similar to the work done on an EGLStreams back-end for GNOME and other EGLStreams work by the smaller Wayland compositors, a NVIDIA engineer is now officially working on an EGLStreams back-end for KWin so that the NVIDIA proprietary driver would play well with KDE on Wayland. Up to now KWin has only supported the Mesa GBM interfaces. KDE developers have said they wouldn't invest in developing an EGLStreams back-end, but that they wouldn't be opposed if say NVIDIA would contribute and maintain the code -- that's what is happening now.

  • Shop update! Digital Atelier and a new USB-Card

    And we’ve also created a new USB-card, with the newest stable version of Krita for all OSes. Includes Comics with Krita, Muses, Secrets of Krita and Animate with Krita tutorial packs.

  • GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

    I represented GNOME, sadly alone because the other selected mentor didn’t get the US visa in time. This was my first trip out of India and I couldn’t plan it properly1, so I went there for just the two conference days.

GNOME Mutter Brings More Fixes, Shell 3.31.2 Has Some Performance Work

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GNOME

New development releases of GNOME Shell and Mutter are out today in the 3.31 development series along with new 3.30 stable point releases that back-port more fixes for these important pieces to the GNOME desktop.

Mutter 3.31.2 brings a number of fixes including better handling for non-UTF8 encodings, memory leak fixes from the 3.30 series, a possible crash when restarting the window manager, initial Meson build system support, a crash fix for monitor hot-plugging, and other fixes rounding this out as a practical update.

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GNOME and KDE Krita Picks

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Richard Hughes: More fun with libxmlb

    A few days ago I cut the 0.1.4 release of libxmlb, which is significant because it includes the last three features I needed in gnome-software to achieve the same search results as appstream-glib.

  • Usability Testing in Open Source Software (SeaGL)

    I've been involved in Free/open source software since 1993, but recently I developed an interest in usability testing in open source software. During a usability testing class in my Master's program in Scientific and Technical Communication (MS) I studied the usability of GNOME and Firefox. Later, I did a deeper examination of the usability of open source software, focusing on GNOME, as part of my Master's capstone. (“Usability Themes in Open Source Software,” 2014.)

    Since then, I've joined the GNOME Design Team where I help with usability testing.

  • [Krita] Second Edition of “Dessin et peinture numérique avec Krita” published!

    The first edition was written forfor Krita 2.9.11, almost three years ago. A lot of things have changed since then! So Timothée has completely updated this new edition for Krita version 4.1. There are also a number of notes about the new features in Krita 4.

    And more-over, D-Booker worked again on updating and improving the French translation of Krita! Thanks again to D-Booker edition for their contribution.

  • [Krita] Interview with HoldXtoRevive

    About 4 years ago I downloaded GIMP as I wanted to get back into art after not drawing for about 15 years. I got a simple drawing tablet soon after and things just progressed from there.

GNOME: Purism Fractal Sponsorship and Developer Center Initiative

Filed under
GNOME
  • Purism Fractal sponsorship

    I’m happy to announce that Purism agreed to sponsor my work on Fractal for the next couple of weeks. I will polish the room history and drastically improve the UX/UI around scrolling, loading messages etc. which will make Fractal feel much nicer. As part of this I will also clean up and refactor the current code. On my agenda is the following:

  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 10th November 2018

    Thibault currently holds a branch for gnome-devel-docs. The branch contains the old GNOME Developer docs ported to markdown. To ensure that no duplicate work happens between gnome-devel-docs master and the branch, the next step is to announce to relevant mailing lists that further contribution to the developer docs should happen in the gnome-devel-docs branch. Even more ideal would be to have the branch pushed to master. The markdown port is not synchronized in any way with the mallard docs in master, so any changes to the mallard docs would require re-synchronization and that’s why currently editing ported markdown docs in the branch currently is a no-go for now.

    Pushing the branch does imply that we initially loose translations though and most changes made to gnome-devel-docs seem to be translations these days with a few exceptions (mostly grammar corrections). Thibault and Mathieu expressed interest in supporting translated docs in the future, but it is a substantial amount of work and low on the todo list.

    We agreed that I should try to get in touch by e-mail to the relevant mailing lists (including translations) and to individuals who contributed to gnome-devel-docs recently to hear their opinion before we proceed.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU Compiler and Bison 3.2.2 Release

  • Intel Cascade Lake Support Posted For The GCC Compiler
    Intel developers have submitted their GCC compiler enablement patch for the Cascade Lake 14nm CPUs due out starting in early 2019. The GNU Compiler Collection patch adds support for the -march=cascadelake target for generating optimized code for these upcoming server and enthusiast class processors.
  • Bison 3.2.2 released [stable]
    Bison 3.2 brought massive improvements to the deterministic C++ skeleton, lalr1.cc. When variants are enabled and the compiler supports C++11 or better, move-only types can now be used for semantic values. C++98 support is not deprecated. Please see the NEWS below for more details. Many thanks to Frank Heckenbach for paving the way for this release with his implementation of a skeleton in C++17, and to Nelson H. F. Beebe for testing exhaustively portability issues.

Industrial dev board builds on Raspberry Pi CM3

Kontron announced an industrial-focused “Passepartout” development kit built around a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Light and equipped with a dual Ethernet, HDMI, CAN, 1-Wire, RPi 40-pin connectors. Kontron announced its first Raspberry Pi based product. The Passepartout — which is French for “goes everywhere” and the name of Phileas Fogg’s valet in Jules Verne’s “Around the World in Eighty Days” — builds upon the Linux-driven Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Light (CM3L). The Light version lacks the 4GB of eMMC flash of the standard CM3 module but still supports eMMC or microSD storage. The CM3L is otherwise identical, with features including a quad-core, 1.2GHz Broadcom BCM2837 and 1GB of LPDDR2 RAM. Read more

Patches For The Better Spectre STIBP Approach Revised - Version 7 Under Review

Version 7 of the task property based options to enable Spectre V2 userspace-userspace protection patches, a.k.a. the work offering improved / less regressing approach for STIBP, is now available for testing and code review. Tim Chen of Intel sent out the seventh revision to these patches on Tuesday night. Besides the Spectre V2 app-to-app protection modes, these patches include the work for disabling STIBP (Single Thread Indirect Branch Predictors) when enhanced IBRS (Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation) is supported/used, and allowing for STIBP to be enabled manually and just by default for non-dumpable tasks. Read more

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