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GNOME

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Wayland ♡ drawing tablets

    So this is finally happening. The result of much work all through the stack from several dedicated individuals (You know who you are!) started lining up during the past few months and now is hitting master. Early in the cycle I blogged about stylus support being merged, based on the first version of the tablet protocols. Now I have the pleasure to declare GTK+ tablet support on Wayland feature complete.

  • GNOME/GTK Support For Drawing Tablets On Wayland Is Feature Complete

    In time for next month's GNOME 3.22 release, the drawing tablet support for GNOME on Wayland is getting into shape.

    GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho wrote today how it's "finally happening" that good support for drawing tablets when running GNOME on Wayland is becoming a reality. Carlos declares that the GTK+ tablet support on Wayland is considered feature complete.

  • Mutter Window Manager Updated for GNOME 3.22 with Virtual Input Device Support

    GNOME Project's Florian Müllner announced the release of the Beta build of the upcoming Mutter window and compositing manager for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

    As reported by us earlier today, the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment entered Beta stages of development, which means that most of its core components and applications have been updated to this Beta release, including Mutter, which is in charge of displaying and managing your GNOME desktop via OpenGL (accelerated 3D graphics).

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Sysprof + Builder

    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later.

    A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice.

    On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.

  • GUADEC… Its been fun.

    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went!

    It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).

  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation

    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...

GNOME News

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  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided looks like it may be getting a Linux & SteamOS release

    Woah! Holy Sh...Deus Ex: Mankind Divided looks like it may be getting a Linux & SteamOS release which has literally blown my tiny little mind.

  • The Pirate: Caribbean Hunt, a free to play pirate ship sim is coming to Linux

    From Polish developers Home Net Games it features pretty nice visuals, but I am doing my usual wait and see approach on their funding method. Hopefully it won't be pay to win malarkey.

    Looking at their website, it looks like it's already a mobile game that is now being pushed onto PC. Hopefully they won't make the same mistake a lot of developers do and keep the mobile feel to it.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Might Be Seeing A Linux Release

    Today marked the release of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided for Windows gamers and there's signs it might see a native Linux port.

    Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is a RPG stealth video game developed by Eidos Montreal and published by Square Enix. This single-player game has so far received positive reviews from Windows game sites.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Maps is fast again!

    Once your distro of choice picks up one of these stable releases you should be back to at least the old Mapquest speed of Maps. And if your distro upgrades to latest libchamplain when it arrives you will see even greater speeds.

  • GTK Scene Kit Isn't Happening In Time For GNOME 3.22

    With GNOME 3.19 there were plans for a GTK scenegraph and this GTK Scene Kit (GSK) was then planned for 3.20 and then most recently hoped for 3.22. But it's not happening.

    One of the big user benefits to the GTK Scene Kit will be offloading more work to the GPU and while it looked like GSK may finally be a reality for GNOME 3.22, this morning we found out it's not going to be merged in time.

  • GSoC: final evaluation

    This blog-post contains the final evaluation of my Google summer of Code 2016 project for the GNOME organization. More precisely, I’ve been working in the Games application under the mentorship of Adrien Plazas implementing multi-source/multi-disc games and offer support to the PlayStation platform.

  • GUADEC

    I arrived at GUADEC a few days early to participate in the Board and AdBoard meetings.

  • GSoC Summary

    The goal to be achieved was to be able to play both single player and multiplayer emulated games using a gamepad in GNOME Games

GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" Desktop Environment Gets Its First Public Beta Release

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GNOME

GNOME Project's Frederic Peters informs us a few minutes ago about the availability of the first Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems.

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GNOME News

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GNOME
  • GUADEC 2016, laptops and tablets made to run GNOME, surprise Pitivi meeting

    I arrived a couple of days early to attend my last GNOME Foundation board meeting, in one of the KIT’s libraries. The building’s uncanny brutalist architecture only added to the nostalgia of a two years adventure coming to an end:

  • GUADEC: what a week!

    So, another GUADEC is over. As I said in the previous post, this was my second time at the event. This time I’ve tried to be more involved: I applied for the volunteer team by helping with the catering which gave me the opportunity to meet the organizers (by the way, they are amazing!). Volunteering is a great experience, you have the opportunity to see some parts of the hard work that is behind the scene in a conference like GUADEC. I would recommend it to everyone!

  • GNOME's New US-Based Conference Is One Month Away

    Happening next month in Portland, Oregon is GNOME's first US-based conference.

    The Libre Application Summit (LAS) is the new event hosted by GNOME. It's described as like "a userland version of the Linux Plumbers conference." There will be discussions at LAS about Flatpak and other application technologies.

  • GNOME Photos 3.21.90 released
  • GNOME Photos 3.22 Is Coming With Sharing Support

    GNOME Photos 3.21.90 was released this weekend and it finally adds experimental sharing support ahead of next month's GNOME 3.22 release.

  • Do you want to test GNOME Photos?

    If you are interested in testing the latest version of GNOME Photos, now it will be easier than before!

    Recently we made Photos available as a Flatpak application. This means that you can now run the latest, unstable version and help us to find regressions or general bugs. At this time to install the application you still need to use the command line.

  • Oranchelo: A New Flat Icon Theme for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    You may have tried lots of icon themes and you may have a favorite but it is always a good idea to give try a new theme, who knows you may like. Here we are presenting you a new icon theme 'Oranchelo' which made way to Linux last year and continuously adding new icons. It is created with the design techniques "flat" and "Flat Long Shadow". Basically it is inspired by two icon themes "super-flat-remix" and "Cornie icons", some icons are also extracted from the pack Plateau icon theme. There is an official PPA from creator of this pack but only offers package for Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Ubuntu derivatives. Since this icon theme is in active development, if you encounter any missing icon then directly report it creator via Github page. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Recap of first impressions
  • Paper Prototype Test Analysis

    This usability test was a paper prototype usability test of the updated GNOME Settings application. Ciarrai included ten testers between twenty and forty years old, with good gender distribution (male, female, nonbinary) and pretty equal preferred OS platform (Mac, Windows, Linux) with slightly more non-technology professionals than technology professionals. Every participant claimed to use the internet daily. Only three of the participants had ever seen GNOME before.

KDE and GNOME

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KDE
GNOME
  • Taming KDEwallet

    On opensuse forums, I often see complaints about KDEwallet (or “kwallet” for short). It can be annoying at times. In this post, I’ll indicate ways of keeping it under control.

    While this is oriented toward opensuse, it should also apply to other distros with one caveat. In opensuse, some of the applications have their settings and configuration under the directory “$HOME/.kde4”. For other distros, it is more typical to use “$HOME/.kde” (without that final “4”). So just adjust my suggestions accordingly.

  • KDE Applications 16.08 Released, Canonical Becomes A Patron

    KDE Applications 16.08 was released today as the newest bundle of KDE applications built atop KDE Frameworks 5.

    KDE Applications 16.08 features the KF5 ports of Kolourpaint, Cervisia, and KDiskFree. KDE's Kontact suite has also been improved upon, Marble 2.0 was added, Ark archiving support can now handle ApplImage and more, the Konsole terminal has been improved, and much more.

  • Emoji Toolbar Control
  • Contributors to Nautilus

    At GUADEC Andre Klaper made a report of top most contributors to GNOME in the last year, and to my surprise I saw my name in the top 5 of patch reviewers. Did I really review so many patches?

  • Mutter Now Supports Virtual Input Devices, GNOME Shell Improved Wayland Keyboard

    The GNOME 3.21.90 packages were released this week in preparation for next month's GNOME 3.22 desktop release.

    GNOME Shell 3.21.90 features an improved on-screen keyboard for Wayland. Also various bugs were fixed as part of this update.

GNOME News

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  • Unit Testing GTK+ libraries: has_default GtkWidget property
  • Autotools Templates for GNOME Builder for GTK+ Vala applications

    I’ve recently finished a makefile to make easy to create GTK+ applications as well as GTK+ libraries using Vala programing language.

  • Looking forward to LAS GNOME!

    I'm on the schedule for LAS GNOME this September, to share our usability test results. Diana, Ciarrai and Renata have been working hard this summer in GNOME Outreachy, doing different usability tests. Our tests include a paper prototype test of the new Settings app, a traditional usability test of other areas of GNOME development, and a first experience test where people use GNOME for the first time. This promises to be interesting!

  • First impressions of GNOME usability testing

    I am delighted to have completed usability testing on 10 participants!

    Generally speaking, the testing process went really well. There are of course some downsides to it. I’ll go ahead and share an unordered list of some things that went right and some that went wrong:

  • Flock & GUADEC 2016

    The last two weeks were pretty busy for me because I travelled to two of my most favourite conferences – Flock and GUADEC.

    Flock was held in Krakow this year, so the traveling was a sort of easy for me. Krakow is just 350 km from Brno which is about 3.5 hours by car. The conference was again organized in the hotel where almost everyone stayed. The same setup was already in Rochester last year and people appreciated it. It’s very convenient. You don’t have to travel to the venue, you can sneak out to have a nap, which is super useful if you’re fighting jet lag, and you can use hotel facilities such as a gym or swimming pool.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • A quick look at using JSX in GNOME

    Thanks to a travel sponsorship from the GNOME foundation, I was able to attend the GTK+ hackfest in Toronto recently. The discussions and energy there inspired me to work on a prototype of something I had been thinking about for a while: using JSX to create GtkWidgets.

  • GSoC: final week and results

    Hello everyone, I’m very glad to announce that my GSoC project about implementing games with multiple medias is being finished this very week. Although the code is still being tested, it won’t have big changes. With that said, I’ll show and explain the results.

  • Using the GtkSourceView API to write scripts that manipulate text

    In the gnome-c-utils repository, I wrote some scripts that use the GtkSourceView library.

    When a script needs to read some text, search something in it, and possibly edit the content, then having a GtkTextBuffer is really convenient.

  • The Meson build system at GUADEC 2016

    For the third year in a row, Centricular was at GUADEC, and this year we sponsored the evening party on the final day at Hoepfner’s Burghof! Hopefully everyone enjoyed it as much as we hoped. Smile

    The focus for me this year was to try and tell people about the work we've been doing on porting GStreamer to Meson and to that end, I gave a talk on the second day about how to build your GNOME app ~2x faster than before.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Analyzing usability test results
  • My Keynote at GUADEC 2016

    Last Friday, I gave the first keynote at GUADEC 2016. I was delighted for the invitation from the GNOME Foundation to deliver this talk, which I entitled Confessions of a command line geek: why I don’t use GNOME but everyone else should.

  • GUADEC 2016: Core Days

    I’m having the opportunity to once again go to GUADEC. I’ve had many great discussions, There’s so many great people to meet here.

  • GNOME Turns 19, Debian Turns 23 Years Old

    There are at least two exciting Linux/open-source birthdays to celebrate this week.

    Yesterday marked 19 years since the GNOME desktop environment was founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena.

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today's leftovers

  • Refracta 8 Beta 2 Screenshot Tour
  • Please share the news! OpenMandriva Lx Project of the Week at SourceForge
    OpenMandriva Lx has been chosen by SourceForge to be among Projects of the Week August 22nd, 2016.
  • Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed
    Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.” Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.
  • Slackware Live Edition 1.1.3 based on Slackware -current 11 Aug 2016
    Last time I wrote about Slackware Live Edition was when I released the version 1.1.0 of the scripts. And that was two months ago; lots of updates have been made inbetween. Today I released version 1.1.3 of ‘liveslak’. I made a set of ISO images (during the last couple of days actually… it is time-consuming) for the Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.3 and using Slackware-current dated “Thu Aug 11 18:24:29 UTC 2016“. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘.
  • Take that boredom
    While I was bored on Defcon, I took the smallest VPS in DO offering (512MB RAM, 20GB disk), configured nginx on it, bought domain zlatan.tech and cp'ed my blog data to blog.zlatan.tech. I thought it will just be out of boredom and tear it apart in a day or two but it is still there. Not only that, the droplet came with Debian 8.5 but I just added unstable and experimental to it and upgraded. Just to experiment and see what time will I need to break it. To make it even more adventurous (and also force me to not take it too much serious, at least at this point) I did something on what Lars would scream - I did not enable backups!
  • Mir 0.24 Released, Vulkan Still Not Supported
  • First Ever Smartphone Market Recession - Two Quarters of Market Decline Means Flat or Declining Annual Smartphone Sales for 2016 - Oh, and Q2 Market Data
    First off, the big news. We’ve hit the first Smartphone Market Recession. I just finished doing the Q2 market analysis (its the summer vacation and a slow time in tech, and the numbers are of course here, below) but yeah. We now do see the numbers clearly. Like in how they measure the GDP growth/decline as a measure of an economy being in a recession, we can now declare that officially, the smartphone market has hit its first-ever recession. For two quarters in a row, counting a 12 month moving average sales, the smartphone market has contracted. It hasn’t contracted by much (only 2%) but it is nonetheless the first time ever that this industry of less than 20 years of age has contracted. Even in previous global economic recessions, the smartphone market grew. Now it didn’t. So previously I was predicting a modest growth for the market from year 2015 to 2016, now I say there will be no growth, we’ll be lucky to have flat sales (about 1.44 Billion smartphones sold) and its likely we’ll be down a bit, like 1.41 Billion)

Leftovers: Software

  • MKVToolNix 9.4 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Polishes Existing Functionality
    MKVToolNix creator Moritz Bunkus proudly announced the release of MKVToolNix 9.4.0, the latest stable and most advanced build of the open-source and free MKV (Matroska) manipulation software for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows OSes. Dubbed Knurl, MKVToolNix 9.4.0 is not a major release, and there aren't many improvements added to its core components. Instead, this maintenance update tries to polish existing functionality and address a few of the issues reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.3.1. Also, it comes with a warning for package maintainers who reported issues when compiling the app against libEBML 1.3.4 and libMatroska 1.4.5.
  • 4 Cloud-based Applications that Work Perfectly on Linux
    As far as cloud-based applications go, the market seems to be very competitive. With the recent OneDrive controversy, users are becoming much more conscious about how and where they invest their valuable data. Pricing changes or changes in business models have started to backfire against companies pretty quickly. In other words, cloud-based applications are no longer second-class citizens on the desktop. In fact, they have become a solid business model that big companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple heavily rely on. Now that the cloud has become an end-user commodity rather than a product that was meant for data giants, companies are trying hard to increase the outreach of their cloud services to clients across all platforms. One such attempt is to bring more Linux users to the party by treating Linux-based desktops at the same level as their Windows and Mac counterparts. Many cloud-focused companies have already made available well-supported Linux clients for their services. This, in turn, has made Linux as a lucrative platform for people who dual boot or switch their computers a lot. That way, they can enjoy all their important files on Windows at work and Linux at home. It's a win-win situation for both parties. Today, we will be focusing on a few such cloud-based applications that work natively on Linux without any major glitches or bugs.
  • The Forecast Isn’t Looking Bright For GNOME Weather
    GNOME Weather is no longer able to display weather forecasts.
  • This App Lets You Set-Up And Configure Razer Keyboards on Linux