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GNOME

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • November Bug Squash Month: GJS

    During November I finally took the leap and offered to become a maintainer of GJS. My employer Endless has been sponsoring work on bugs 742249 and 751252, porting GJS’s Javascript engine from SpiderMonkey 24 to SpiderMonkey 31. But aside from that I had been getting interested in contributing more to it, and outside of work I did a bunch of maintenance work modernizing the Autotools scripts and getting it to compile without warnings. From there it was a small step to officially volunteering.

  • Core Apps Hackfest afterthoughts

    During last weekend, I was very happy to attend the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. This is effectively the first hackfest I’ve ever been! Thanks Carlos for organizing that, thanks Kinvolk folks for hosting the event, and Collabora for sponsoring the dinner.

    This event was a great chance to meet the maintainers in person and talk directly to the designers about doubts we have. Since Carlos already wrote down the list of tasks we worked on, I’m not going to repeat it. So here, I’ll report what I was able to work on.

  • Contribute to Polari with this one simple trick!

    I’ve been rather quiet recently working on new features for Builder. But we managed to just release Builder 3.22.3 which is full of bug fixes and a really new important feature. You can now meaningfully target flatpak when building your application. Matthew Leeds has done this outstanding work and it is really going to simplify how you contribute to GNOME applications going forward.

    I’m really happy with the quality of this feature because it has shown me where our LibIDE design has done well, and where it has not. Of course, we will address that for 3.24 to help make some of the UI less confusing.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • GNOME Software 3.22.3 Lets Users Upgrade Two Fedora Linux Versions at a Time

    A new maintenance version of the GNOME Software package manager has been released on the first day of December 2016, versioned 3.22.3, for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

  • gtkmm 4 started

    We (the gtkmm developers) have started work on an ABI-breaking gtkmm-4.0, as well as an ABI-breaking glibmm, target GTK+ 4, and letting us clean up some cruft that has gathered over the years. These install in parallel with the existing gtkmm-3.0 and glibmm-2.4 APIs/ABIs.

  • Gtkmm Begins Preparing For GTK4, Now Uses C++14

    Gtkmm, the project providing the de facto C++ interface for GTK+, is preparing for the GTK+ 4.0 era.

    Gtkmm 3.89.1 was released today as the first release based against the GTK+ 4.0 development code and can be installed in parallel with gtkmm-3.0. Aside from basing against GTK 4.0, gtkmm now uses C++14, has removed deprecated APIs, and other changes. Gtkmm using C++14 succeeds its C++11 usage.

Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS
GNOME
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016

    Last weekend I attended the GNOME Core Apps hackfest that I helped organize here in Berlin.

    It was the first time I participated in a Core Apps hackfest and I must say I am really glad with how it all went. I felt like there was a perfect balance of planning, working, and just hanging out together. If you want to know more about the planned items, check out this very complete post by Carlos Soriano.

  • Core Apps Hackfest

    Last weekend I attended the Core Apps hackfest in Berlin. This was a reboot of the Content Apps hackfest we held last year around the same time of year, with a slightly broader focus. One motivation behind these events was to try and make sure that GNOME has a UX focused event in Europe at the beginning of the Autumn/Spring development cycle, since this is a really good time to come together and plan what we want to work on for the next GNOME version.

  • Highlights from ISTA and GTAC 2016

    Another two weeks have passed and I'm blogging about another 2 conferences. This year both Innovations in Software Technologies and Automation and Google Test Automation Conference happened on the same day. I was attending ISTA in Sofia during the day and watching the live stream of GTAC during the evenings. Here are some of the things that reflected on me:

  • FGSL XIII Event Report

    Before I became a Fedora Project contributor, I went to an event in the central west region of Brazil called FGSL ( “Fórum Goiano de Software Livre”), which had its 12th edition in 2015. It was a great event, and now ( 2016) that I have joined the Fedora Community as a contribuitor I thought about being there again, this time representing the Fedora Project.

GNOME Builder 3.22.3 IDE Lets You Build and Run Flatpak Apps, Supports LLVM 3.9

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GNOME

Today, November 29, 2016, the development team behind the open-source GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software project announced the availability of version 3.22.3.

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Also: Flatpak 0.6.14 Linux Application Sandboxing and Distribution Framework Out Now

GNOME Core Apps Hackfest

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GNOME
  • Whereabouts at the CoreApps Hackfest

    For the past three days I have been to the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. It’s been nice and cozy! Kinvolk has some nice facilities that we could borrow and it’s been productive for me even if I missed the first day as anticipated.

  • Core Apps Hackfest – A success!

    The GNOME Core Apps Hackfest just finished, I’m happy to say that it was a success!

    Many people from different backgrounds were able to come, either from the community or from companies like Red Hat, Endless, Kinvolk, etc. all of us involved in different parts of the GNOME project.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • This week in GTK+ – 26

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 40 commits, with 1551 lines added and 1998 lines removed.

  • Linux communities, we need your help!

    There are a lot of Linux communities all over the globe filled with really nice people who just want to help others. Typically these people either can’t (or don’t feel comfortable) coding, and I’d love to harness some of that potential by adding a huge number of new application reviews to the ODRS. At the moment we have about 1100 reviews, mostly covering the more popular applications, and also mostly written in English.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • List of Productive GNOME Shell Extensions for Daily Usage

    In this article I listed my favorite GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that I, myself, had ever used. GSE in GNOME is similar with Addons in Firefox, they add and extend desktop functionality with many features. I listed here GSE for screen recording, proxy, network indicator, and some more.

  • I spy, with my little eye, Gnome Pie

    Regardless of the factual conclusion of this article, you are already sold on it just based on the title. Anyway. Humans are really good at solving problems, especially, or possibly only, if they are linear. It is not a coincidence that we have manuals that follow through a simple top-down logic or that navigation systems use turn-by-turn instructions. Square root of 7443 anyone? But this is not a biology lesson. And yet, it is.

    Operating systems are designed to help users translate their linear thinking into instructions. When they do this successfully, we have what we call intuitive interfaces. When they don’t, we have nerdy things that no one wants to use. The system menu is probably the most important ingredient of any desktop, as it’s the gateway to all we do on a computer. Most of these solutions are linear. Things go bad otherwise. Just check my Fedora 18 review for a quick reminder. Windows 8 anyone? Now Linux wise, there’s also this thing called Gnome Pie. It’s a radical answer to the idea of a system menu, and a challenge to the whole linearity concept. Does it work?

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Evolution 3.24 Email and Groupware Client to Support XZ Compression for Backups

    Yesterday, we reported on the availability of the second development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, and we promised we'd cover the most important application updates pushed as part of this unstable branch.

  • GNOME Shell, Mutter to Handle Three-Finger Touchpad Pinch Gestures in GNOME 3.24

    Today we're continuing our reports on the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment with what landed for the GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window and composite manager as part of the GNOME 3.23.2 development release.

  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Land New 3.24 Development Releases, NVIDIA Wayland Support

    They missed Tuesday's GNOME 3.23.2 release, but available as of Wednesday evening is Mutter 3.23.2 and GNOME Shell 3.23.2.

    Mutter 3.23.2 now stacks docks below other windows on full-screen windows, supports touchpad pinch gestures with more than two fingers, implements drawing tablet support on X11, fixes some Wine games starting minimized, fixed switching between scrolling modes on Wayland, support for EGLStream/EGLDevice, and other bug fixes and improvements. The EGLStream/EGLDevice support is what allows the mainline NVIDIA Wayland on GNOME support.

  • I’m going to the Core Apps Hackfest

    In this exact moment, I’m packing up my stuff to attend the Core Apps Hackfest organized by Carlos Soriano and kindly hosted by Kinvolk. It’ll happen in Berlin, German.

GNOME News

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GNOME
  • GNOME Music 3.24 App to Use Cairo for Album Cover Scaling, Smooth Progress Bar

    We reported earlier on the release of the GNOME 3.23.2 desktop environment, which is an early development snapshot of the upcoming major GNOME 3.24 release, and we told you that we'd be covering the most important parts of this milestone.

    Now, we've told you what's new in the Epiphany 3.23.2 web browser, and, in this article, we'd like to tell you about some of the changes implemented in the GNOME Music application, which is the default music playback utility distributed as part of the GNOME Stack.

  • GNOME Software to Add Content Rating Interface for Linux Games, Flatpak Changes

    We reported the other day that the GNOME 3.23.2 desktop is out, which is the second development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.24 release, bringing many updated components and applications.

  • Cinnamon 3.2 Desktop Officially Released, Here's How to Install It on Ubuntu

    Earlier this month, we were among the first to report on the availability of the Cinnamon 3.2 desktop environment, which we'll be able to fully enjoy on the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" operating system, due for release in December 2016.

    Later, we were also the first to report on the first point release of the Cinnamon 3.2 desktop environment, but now everything is official. "On behalf of the team and all the developers who contributed to this build, I am proud to announce the release of Cinnamon 3.2," said Clement Lefebvre, leader of the Linux Mint project, in the official release announcement.

Epiphany Web Browser Updated for GNOME 3.24 with New Hidden Homepage Settings

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GNOME
Web

As part of today's GNOME 3.23.2 development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, several core components and apps from the GNOME Stack received many improvements and new features.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48
    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28
    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.

OSS: AI and Machine Learning

Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Canonical Sues Cloud Provider, Mint Beta, Devuan Tour
    Ubuntu parent-company, Canonical, today posted that they've been in a dispute with "a European cloud provider" over their use of their own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers. Their implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical is worried something bad could happen and it'd reflect badly back on them. The post read, "The home-grown images of this provider disable fundamental security mechanisms and modify the system in ways that are unsupportable. They are likely to behave unpredictably on update in weirdly creative and mysterious ways." They said they've spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. Canonical feels they have no choice but to "take legal steps to remove these images." They're sure Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn't be treated like this.
  • Taking a stand against unofficial Ubuntu images
    Ubuntu is amazing on the cloud because we work with cloud providers to ensure crisp, consistent and secure images which you can auto-update safely. On every major cloud—AWS, Azure, Google, Rackspace, SoftLayer and many more—you can be confident that ‘Ubuntu’ is Ubuntu, with the same commitment to quality that you can expect when you install it yourself, and we can guarantee that to you because we require that clouds offer only certified Ubuntu images.
  • Canonical Takes Stand Against Unofficial Ubuntu Images, Reportedly Risky & Insecure
    Mark Shuttleworth has written a new blog post where he's outlining a dispute Canonical is having with a European cloud provider over a breach of contract and "publishing insecure, broken images of Ubuntu" for its cloud customers. With these Ubuntu Cloud unofficial images reportedly being buggy, users are complaining to Canonical/Ubuntu, assuming it's an upstream issue. Having enough of that, they are now preparing for legal steps to remove the unofficial Ubuntu images from the particular cloud provider.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” MATE – BETA Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Cinnamon – BETA Release