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GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Final Beta Features GNOME 3.24 with Night Light, Flatpak 0.8

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GNOME
Ubuntu

As part of yesterday's Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta release, the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 operating system got its second Beta milestone bringing with it the latest development version of the recently released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment.

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Also: Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 Includes KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop, KDE Applications 16.12.3

Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 Beta 2 Brings Latest GNOME 3.24 Apps, Budgie 10.2.9 Desktop

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

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GNOME
  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework

    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.

  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed

    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.

  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here

    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.

  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)

    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

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GNOME
Reviews

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment.

But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers.

With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.)

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Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

GNOME and GTK News

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GNOME
  • GNOME ED Update – Week 12

    In case you haven’t seen it yet, there’s a new GNOME release – 3.24! The release is the result of 6 months’ work by the GNOME community.

  • GTK hackfest 2017: D-Bus communication with containers

    At the GTK hackfest in London (which accidentally became mostly a Flatpak hackfest) I've mainly been looking into how to make D-Bus work better for app container technologies like Flatpak and Snap.

  • GNOME 3.24 Linux Desktop Environment Released | Here Are The New Features

    The GNOME Project has released the latest stable version of their open source desktop environment. GNOME 3.24, codenamed Portland, is here after 6 months of development and 28459 changes. Some of the biggest features of GNOME 3.24 are Night Light, improved notifications, new Recipes and Games application, two GPU support, etc.

GNOME News: GNOME 3.24 Everywhere

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24 released

    The GNOME Project is proud to announce the release of GNOME 3.24, "Portland".

  • GNOME 3.24 Released, This Is What’s New

    Hurrah! GNOME 3.24 is now available to download. The latest stable release of the open-source GNOME desktop, GNOME 3.24 brings a number of new features and improvements to the proverbial table, including one that might even help you sleep better!

  • GNOME 3.24 Linux desktop environment is here

    My absolute favorite desktop environment for Linux is GNOME. Quite frankly, if the DE went away tomorrow, I might have to rethink my use of Linux entirely. Yeah, I am that passionate about it. Environment aside, the GNOME experience also includes a collection of applications, creating a coherent user experience.

  • GNOME 3.24 Released

    GNOME 3.24, the latest version of GNOME 3, is now available. Introducing an updated platform and applications, the release includes a number of major new features and enhancements, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. 3.24 represents another step forward for GNOME, and has much to offer both users and developers.

GNOME 3.24 is Ready!

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24 released

    This release is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features such as night light, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. GNOME's existing applications have been improved and there is also a new Recipes app. Improvements to our platform include refined notifications and several revamped settings panels.

  • GNOME 3.24 Released With Night Light Mode, Maps Navigation & More

    Matthias Clasen has just announced the official release of GNOME 3.24, codenamed Portland.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here Is What's New

    The GNOME Project is proud to announce today, March 22, 2017, the official availability of the long-anticipated GNOME 3.24 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

    GNOME 3.24 just finished its six-month development cycle, and it's now the most advanced stable version of the modern and popular desktop environment used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions. It was developed since October 2016 under the GNOME 3.23.x umbrella, during which it received numerous improvements.

  • GNOME Photos 3.24.0 Imitates Darktable’s Exposure and Blacks Adjustment Tool

    GNOME Photos developer Debarshi Ray announced today the availability of the GNOME Photos 3.24 major release of the open-source image viewer with basic editing features for the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment.

    The GNOME Project will launch tomorrow, March 22, 2017, the final release of the long-anticipated GNOME 3.24 desktop, a massive update that improves all the applications and core components that are usually shipped with the GNOME Stack, including the GNOME Photos app.

GNOME Photos 3.24.0

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GNOME

It was high time that we overhauled our old GtkIconView-based overview grids. Their inability to reflow the thumbnails leads to a an ugly vertical gutter of empty space unless the window is just the right size. The other problem was performance. GtkIconView gets extremely slow when the icons are updated, which usually happens when content is detected for the first time and start getting thumbnailed.

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GNOME News

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GNOME
  • 6 Features You’ll Love in GNOME 3.24

    We look at 6 of the best new GNOME 3.24 features, including the 'night light' blue light filter, a pair of ace new apps, and integrated weather forecasts.

  • Builder 3.24

    I’m excited to announce that Builder 3.24 is here and ready for you to play with!

    It should look familiar because most of the work this cycle was underneath the hood. I’m pretty happy with all the stabilization efforts from the past couple of weeks. I’d like to give a special thanks to everyone who took the time to file bugs, some of whom also filed patches.

  • Gnome Encfs Manager – An Ease way to Create a Encrypted Directory in Linux

    Gnome Encfs Manager (short name is GEncfsM) is a tool to manage EncFS filesystems in Linux whihc is best alternative for Cryptkeeper and has lots of unique features. It’s very useful when you use EncFS with cloud sync / storage services such as Dropbox, etc.,

  • Blender Constraints

    So what are they and how are they useful in the context of a GNOME designer? We make quite a few prototypes and one of the things to decide whether a behavior is clear and comprehensible is motion design, particularly transitions. And while we do not use tools directly linked to out stack, it helps to build simple rigs to lower the manual labout required to make sometimes similar motion designs and limit the number of mistakes that can be done. Even simple animations usually consist of many keyframes (defined, non-computed states in time). Defining relationships between objects and createing setups, “rigs”, is a way to create of a sort of working model of the object we are trying to mock up.

WebKitGTK+ 2.16

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Development
GNOME

The Igalia WebKit team is happy to announce WebKitGTK+ 2.16. This new release drastically improves the memory consumption, adds new API as required by applications, includes new debugging tools, and of course fixes a lot of bugs.

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GNOME News

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GNOME
  • Discover: Open desktop ratings

    As I’m trying to keep improving the flatpak backend in discover I decided to add support for reviews. To do so I implemented support for GNOME’s Open Desktop Ratings which is rating/review system used by gnome-software. Result of this is now fully functional review system, where you can read user comments and ratings and submit your own reviews. We also use same mechanism as in gnome-software for generating user_hash which identifies you in odrs server and given that you are able to modify/delete your reviews from both discover and gnome-software (note that discover doesn’t support this yet). You can also vote for already existing reviews so others get feedback on how useful each review is. We also decided to use same review system in our PackageKit backend and replace current Ubuntu Popularity Contest system so not only flatpak users will benefit from this. During testing of this review support we’ve hit many UI issues related to review system causing users not to be able see reviews or write new ones which were introduced during transition to kirigami. We fixed all of them and you can look forward to improved experience in the upcoming discover release. To improve this further, we or at least I, would like to also add a new widget showing current total app ratings as of now you can only see reviews with comments only, not overall app rating, but this needs some discussion and design consideration.

  • Builder on the Lunduke Hour

    In case you missed it, I was on the Lunduke Hour last week talking about Builder. In reality it turned into a discussion about everything from why Gtk 4, efficient text editor design, creating UI designers, Flatpak, security implications of the base OS, and more.

  • Will miss GUADEC 2017
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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.