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GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 22nd, 2021

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GNOME

While some of you out there are still waiting for the GNOME 40 desktop environment to arrive in the stable software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution, the GNOME Project is already working on the next major version, GNOME 41.

Development on the GNOME 41 release will kick out soon and it will stick to the same routine as in the GNOME 40 development cycle, meaning that public testers will be able to test drive only an Alpha, a Beta, and a Release Candidate.

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Myxer – A Modern GTK Volume Mixer for PulseAudio

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GNOME

Myxer is a modern new volume mixer application for the PulseAudio sound server. It’s a lightweight and powerful replacement for your system Volume Mixer written in Rust with GTK toolkit.

Myxer can manage audio devices, streams, and even card profiles. And it offers option to show individual audio channels.

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10 Awesome gedit Text Editor Features to Make You More Productive

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Linux
GNOME

Here's a list of the top 10 cool gedit features which you probably not aware of, until now. Take a look.
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New GNOME Designs Explore a ‘Bottom Bar’ Layout for GNOME Shell

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GNOME

For the past 10 years GNOME shell has been based around a single panel stripped across the top of user’s screens — but is this fundamental feature about to change?

Well, to quell whatever dim intrigue I just stirred: no, it’s not. However, GNOME designer Tobias Bernard, a key architect of the well-received GNOME 40 release, is playing around with a concept in which —get this— GNOME’s famous top bar is moved to the bottom of the screen.

Kind of crazy, huh? It’d be the most major ‘major’ design change made to GNOME Shell since it debuted. After all, the top bar is an anchor in the GNOME Shell experience. It’s where the status menu, notification center, clock/calendar applet, app menu, and oh-so-important Activities button all sit.

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For the past 10 years GNOME shell has been based around a single panel stripped across the top of user’s screens — but is this fundamental feature about to change?

Well, to quell whatever dim intrigue I just stirred: no, it’s not. However, GNOME designer Tobias Bernard, a key architect of the well-received GNOME 40 release, is playing around with a concept in which —get this— GNOME’s famous top bar is moved to the bottom of the screen.

Kind of crazy, huh? It’d be the most major ‘major’ design change made to GNOME Shell since it debuted. After all, the top bar is an anchor in the GNOME Shell experience. It’s where the status menu, notification center, clock/calendar applet, app menu, and oh-so-important Activities button all sit.

Read more

Floating Dock Is the Perfect Dock for the GNOME 40 Desktop

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GNOME

Floating Dock is not a new extension for the GNOME desktop, but it was recently updated by its creator to work on the latest GNOME 40 desktop environment, allowing you to have an always visible (or hidden) dock on your screen for launching apps.

As you may be aware, the GNOME 40 desktop environment comes with a major redesign of the Activities Overview that also moves the dock from left side of the screen to the bottom. For me, that makes navigating much easier, but I have to admit that I miss having an always-on dock.

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Tobias Bernard: Permanent Revolution

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GNOME

10 years ago today was April 6, 2011.

Windows XP was still everywhere. Smartphones were tiny, and not everyone had one yet. New operating systems were coming out left and right. Android phones had physical buttons, and webOS seemed to have a bright future. There was general agreement that the internet would bring about a better world, if only we could give everyone unrestricted access to it.

This was the world into which GNOME 3.0 was released.

I can’t speak to what it was like inside the project back then, this is all way before my time. I was still in high school, and though I wasn’t personally contributing to any free software projects yet, I remember it being a very exciting moment.

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Also: GNOME Internet Radio Locator 4.0.1 with KVRX on Fedora Core 33

“Getting Things GNOME” 0.5 released!

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GNOME

This release of GTG has been 9 months in the making after the groundbreaking 0.4 release. While 0.4 was a major “perfect storm” overhaul, 0.5 is also a very technology-intensive release, even though it was done in a relatively short timeframe comparatively.

Getting Things GNOME 0.5 brings a truckload of user experience refinements, bugfixes, a completely revamped file format and task editor, and a couple of notable performance improvements. It doesn’t solve every performance problem yet (some remain), but it certainly improves a bunch of them for workaholics like me. If 0.4 felt a bit like a turtle, 0.5 is a definitely a much faster turtle.

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Getting Things GNOME 0.5 To-Do App Released with Recurring Tasks, Performance Improvements

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GNOME

It's been about nine months since Getting Things GNOME 0.4 was released as a massive update after more than six years of development, and now your favorite personal tasks and to-do app gets another major release, Getting Things GNOME 0.5, bringing user experience refinements, revamped file format and task editor, performance improvements, and killer new features.

The biggest new feature in the Getting Things GNOME 0.5 release is the ability to create recurring (repeating) tasks. This is indeed a must-have feature for any personal tasks, calendar, or to-do app, and I personally can't imagine leaving without it. For those who don't know what recurring tasks are, the feature lets you set automatic reminders (recurrence) for a certain task every day, every other day, as well as weekly, monthly, and yearly.

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6 Reasons Why You Should Upgrade Your Linux Desktop to GNOME 40 Today

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GNOME

GNOME just unveiled its latest release, the GNOME 40 on March 24, 2021. As revolutionary as the jump from V3.38 to V40 has been, the improvements brought together by over 24,000 commits by roughly 822 contributors all across the globe are nothing less than spectacular.

From visual overhauls to performance enhancements, it is one of the biggest updates that GNOME has received since GNOME 3. Let's take a look at a few of the best features and changes that this release brings to the table.

[...]

This new change is more user intuitive as GNOME smartly creates or removes workspaces automatically as per the number of applications open. Additionally, you can also drag and drop your applications across the workspaces and GNOME will smartly rearrange them in a cognizant fashion.

The dock also underwent some minor changes compared to its former version, now allowing the users to have separators to separate user favorite applications and running, but non-favorite applications.

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How to Install GNOME 40 in Ubuntu 21.04 [Testing Only]

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GNOME
Ubuntu

A good samaritan created a PPA which you can add and install GNOME 40 in Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo). And this is only for testing the packages.
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today's leftovers

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 678

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 678 for the week of April 4 – 10, 2021.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Design and Web team summary – 12 April 2021

    The web team at Canonical run two-week iterations building and maintaining all of Canonical websites and product web interfaces. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration. This iteration has seen many of the team out of the office as schools are out in the UK. This has not limited the exciting new features and developments from the team.

  • Enabling Rapid Decision Making with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and NVIDIA Virtual GPU (vGPU)
  • SUSECON Digital 2021: a Behind-the-Scenes Look at a Space Oddity | SUSE Communities

    It’s been almost a year since we unveiled SUSECON Digital 2020 – our first virtual SUSECON event. No lies, that event was pulled off in a frenzied whirlwind of pandemic onslaughts, virtual session recordings, and bandwidth battles. Frankly, I was amazed that we met our production schedule in the wake of the Covid-cancellation of our live event in Dublin. And I was even more amazed at our SUSECON audience reaction to the virtual event. You loved it! As one of the first virtual conferences of the Covid era, your feedback told us that we had delivered exactly what was needed at the time. What an exceptional opportunity for us to include thousands of friends from all over the world who normally can’t join us at the big event!

  • JK Tyre & Industries improves operating efficiency and drives future innovation with SUSE
  • Top 3 Linux Server Operating Systems in 2021

    In this article we will look at several Linux distributions, which are an excellent choice if we want to use them as servers. We chose them precisely because they have an excellent level of security, regular patch maintenance and updates, and huge communities. In addition, there are thousands of tutorials on the Internet for every single thing on how to do it and last but not least they are easy to use. [...] Although we have not put them in the top three, not because they are not unique server operating systems, but because they require more patience, knowledge and time, we must mention FreeBSD, Red Hat, Cent OS and Fedora.

  • Element Keeps conversations in your control

    You are probably using chat applications like Slack, WhatsApp, Discord, Facebook Messenger, Telegram, and another chat app. These are all great to have but in using them you are making a trade-off; you are trading security and privacy for a service that easy to use. Matrix is an open standard for communication messages. It is not a server so much as a standard way for clients and servers to talk with each other. The clients and server are open sources. With Matrix, you are not giving your data away to a company that is going to profile you and target advertising at you. This provides a degree of transparency you can look at the code, and you can be confident that it is behaving itself. Many developer love Matrix because it let them build on it like Lego bricks and write their clients and servers bots or anything else you can self-host your Matrix server and that means you can create a private community where it knows that your communications are not being intercepted by anybody else. Matrix also has the option for end-to-end encryption, so you know that your messages are private. Let’s take a look at a Matrix client known as Element (Riot and Vector) and it is pretty much the reference messaging client.

  • RSS Guard 3.9.2

    RSS Guard is a simple (yet powerful) feed reader. It is able to fetch the most known feed formats, including RSS/RDF and ATOM. It's free, it's open-source. RSS Guard currently supports Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian. RSS Guard will never depend on other services - this includes online news aggregators like Feedly, The Old Reader and others.

  • Free Software: Is It Just A Thing Of The Past?

    Free software is an idea that has existed since before the foundation of Linux but has the idea become stuck in the past and is FOSS something that we should move past, this author seems to think so, I disagree though.

  • New Linux Foundation project takes blockchain and the open source approach to the insurance industry
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  • Linux Foundation Hosts Collaboration Among World’s Largest Insurance Companies

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and the American Association of Insurance Services (AAIS), today are announcing the launch of OpenIDL, the Open Insurance Data Link platform and project. The platform will reduce the cost of regulatory reporting for insurance carriers, provide a standardized data repository for analytics and a connection point for third parties to deliver new applications to members. openIDL brings together some of the world’s largest insurance companies, including The Hanover and Selective Insurance Group, along with technology and service providers Chainyard, KatRisk and MOBI to advance a common distributed ledger platform for sharing information and business processes across the insurance ecosystem. [...] “AAIS, and the insurance industry in general, are trailblazers in their contribution and collaboration to these technologies,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “Open governance networks like openIDL can now accelerate innovation and development of new product and service offerings for insurance providers and their customers. We’re excited to host this work.” As an open source project, all software source code developed will be licensed under an OSI-approved open source license, and all interface specifications developed will be published under an open specification license. And all technical discussions between participants will take place publicly, further enhancing the ability to expand the network to include other participants. As with an openly accessible network, organizations can develop their own proprietary applications and infrastructure integrations.

  • Windows, Ubuntu, Zoom, Safari, MS Exchange Hacked at Pwn2Own 2021

    The 2021 spring edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest concluded last week on April 8 with a three-way tie between Team Devcore, OV, and Computest researchers Daan Keuper and Thijs Alkemade. [...] The Zoom vulnerabilities exploited by Daan Keuper and Thijs Alkemade of Computest Security are particularly noteworthy because the flaws require no interaction of the victim other than being a participant on a Zoom call. What's more, it affects both Windows and Mac versions of the app, although it's not clear if Android and iOS versions are vulnerable as well. Technical details of the flaws are yet to be disclosed, but in a statement sharing the findings, the Dutch security firm said the researchers "were then able to almost completely take over the system and perform actions such as turning on the camera, turning on the microphone, reading emails, checking the screen and downloading the browser history."

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel and libldb), Debian (mediawiki, qemu, ruby-kramdown, and xen), Fedora (grub2, libldb, libopenmpt, python-pikepdf, python39, samba, squid, and webkit2gtk3), openSUSE (bcc, ceph, gssproxy, hostapd, isync, kernel, openexr, openSUSE KMPs, and tpm2-tss-engine), SUSE (fwupdate and wpa_supplicant), and Ubuntu (spamassassin).

Programming Leftovers

  • Create Beautiful Websites Using Emacs Org Mode

    In my never-ending quest to find the perfect way to create beautiful (yet minimal) websites, I had to try out Org Export in Emacs. Since I tend to write everything in Org Mode these days, it would be amazing to simply be able to convert my Org docs into HTML, and maybe add a little CSS to spice things up.

  • Qt Creator 4.15: New CMake Features

    Qt Creator 4.15 comes with a bunch of features and bug fixes for the CMake Project Manager. Below, you have a list of what’s new and a few tips and tricks which would hopefully improve your CMake experience in Qt Creator.

  • 7 Popular Open Source CI/CD Tools

    DevOps is a software development strategy that incorporates agile practices for fast, efficient product creation and release. It focuses on integration of development and operations teams, continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and automation of tasks and processes. Typically, DevOps teams use pipelines to streamline and standardize processes. DevOps pipelines are toolchains that teams can use to automate tasks and provide visibility into the software development life cycle. In this article, we’ll cover seven popular open source CI/CD tools.

  • Community Member Monday: Gökçe Kuler

    I’m from Aydın, Turkey. Currently I’m studying in my final years at the Computer Engineering department of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. I’m interested in free software – and enjoy working with free software projects and learning new things aboutthemit. I met free software when I started university via my advisor Necdet Yücel. I like playing the guitar and the kalimba. Also, I recently started painting with acrylic paints. I’m vegetarian, and actively participate in animal protection and gender equality projects.

  • App Showcase: Drawing

    Drawing is a simple app in the PureOS store to doodle on a digital canvas.

today's howtos

  • How to Use tcpdump and 6 Examples

    Are you trying to capture data packets in order to analyze traffic on your network? Maybe you are a server administrator who has bumped into an issue and wants to monitor transmitted data on the network. Whatever the situation be, the tcpdump Linux utility is what you need. In this article, we will discuss the tcpdump command in detail, along with some guides on how to install and use tcpdump on your Linux system.

  • How to play The Forest on Linux

    The Forest works on Linux, but only with Proton’s help, which is a built-in feature of the Linux release of Steam. So, before we can go over how to configure the game, we must demonstrate how to install Steam on Linux.

  • How to Install CopyQ Clipboard Manager 4.0.0 in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    The CopyQ clipboard manager released version 4.0.0 a day ago. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.04, Ubuntu 18.04 via PPA. CopyQ is a free and open-source clipboard manager with editing and scripting features. The new 4.0.0 release features new script engine with some new functions, better ECMAScript support, improved performance.

  • These 10 Sed Examples Will Make You a Linux Power User

    Editing text files and terminal output is an everyday job for those who administer Linux machines. Command-line utilities like sed allow a user to modify and change the content of a text file right from the terminal window. In this article, we will discuss the sed command in detail, along with some essential examples that demonstrate the power of the sed utility in Linux.

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