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GNOME

Meet the GNOMEies: Regina Nkemchor Adejo

Filed under
Interviews
GNOME

Well, My full name is Regina Nkemchor Adejo, I am a Nigerian. I am a technology enthusiast who transitioned into sciences from an arts background. I currently work as a database and application specialist in a tax organization. I am a YouTube content creator, I create technical videos related to database and Linux administration.

Most importantly, I love computers! I spend most of my time on them.

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There is No “Linux” Platform (Part 2)

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

The problems outlined in Part 1 are of course not new, and people have been working on solutions to them for a long time. Some of these solutions have really started to come together over the last few years, empowering the people making the software to distribute it directly to the people using it.

Thanks to the work of many amazing people in our community you can now develop an app in GNOME Builder, submit it to Flathub, get it reviewed, and have it available for people to install right away. Once it’s on there you can also update it on a schedule you control. No more waiting 6 months for the next distribution release!

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME Themes and GObject Class Private Data

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GNOME
  • How does GNOME themes work

    The GNOME themes file is essentially a CSS file, done, you can stop reading. There are a few more details you may want to hear about. The theme files describe what your desktop looks like but that is not all. It also contains the artwork needed for it to work. You make all your configuration in the CSS file of your theme. A caveat is that much of the look comes from the GTK 2.0 and GTK 3.0 themes. Another issue is that the standard setup does not allow your own themes, you need to download the User Theme extension to use your own theme. The reason is that the theme files delivered with your distribution are compiled from gresource files. This integrates the themes closer to the development process but has the drawback that making your own requires more programming skills. Documentation is also scarce, for users that is. Development documentation is plentiful.

  • GObject Class Private Data

    It can be very handy to store things you might do as meta programming in your GObjectClass‘s private data (See G_TPYE_CLASS_GET_PRIVATE()).

    Doing so is perfectly fine, but you need to be aware of how GTypeInstance initialization works. Each of your parent classes instance init functions are called before your subclasses instance init (and in order of the type hierarchy). What might seem non-obvious though is that the GTypeInstance.g_class pointer is updated as each successive _init() function is called.

Zorin OS Core Makes GNOME More Comfortable

Filed under
OS
GNOME
Reviews

Zorin OS 15.2 is a simple yet workable computing platform. I would prefer to have an option to swap out Zorin OS' GNOME integration for the more flexible XFCE desktop on the Core edition.

If Zorin OS sounds promising to you except for the GNOME experience, consider trying the Lite edition. XFCE, despite its lightweight design, offers a more traditional desktop layout experience.

Zorin OS has some fine features that are buried within settings options. I would like to see some included help screens and other new user documentation built into Zorin OS. Users unfamiliar with Linux or the otherwise barren landscape when first seeing the Zorin desktop would have an easier time getting started using it.

This independent Ubuntu-based Linux distribution is designed especially for newcomers to Linux, but established Linux users looking for a change of pace without the need for stretching their technical acumen should not shy away from this distro.

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A Summary Between KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS And GNOME 3.36 Gresik

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KDE
GNOME

After publishing my latest GNOME and then Plasma articles, I think it is interesting to summarize between them in a separate article considering several interesting stuffs. First, their release date are the same, 11, except Plasma is in February and GNOME is in March. Second, they publish interesting videos and announcements I listed below. Third, they had conferences in 2019 that back them up namely Akademy and GNOME.Asia Summit I also listed below. Fourth, they have users who love to write reviews such as Dedoimedo and OMG! Ubuntu I listed below too. Last but not least, I also mentioned where to download their source code, to contribute to them, and the donation links. I wish this summary article helps you in figuring out more about both. Enjoy desktop GNU/Linux!

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Geary 3.36 Released with Redesigned Mail Composer, Expansive ‘Undo’ Support

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GNOME

A new version of Geary, the GTK-based email client for Linux desktops, is now available to download.

Geary 3.36 is said to offer “a number of enhancements, bug fixes, and server compatibility improvements” over the previous release, which launched back in September 2019.

This popular open source app can handle IMAP and SMTP mails accounts, and works well with web mail providers like Gmail, including fast account set-up.

Among the new features is all-new email composer. This now boasts a responsive design (handy with GNOME on phones) plus support for both drag and drop and copy and paste images in RTF emails; an emoji input picker; and better missing attachment detection.

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Also: GNOME's Mutter Finally Wires Up Middle Button Click Emulation

KDE and GNOME: ikona 1.0, KF5, Shortwave Goes Stable and How to Use Sysprof

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • ikona 1.0

    this is where Ikona's meat lies—the application icon view. it displays application icons at a pixel-perfect size in an environment similar to a Plasma desktop.

    by default, it just shows Ikona's icon. the real meat is when you press “Create Icon.” this exports a special type of SVG with the suffix .ikona.app.svg. Ikona can process these SVGs to produce multiple sizes of the same icon from one SVG file, making wrangling with multiple sizes of icon simple.

    saving the icon will cause Ikona to instantly update its preview of the icon.

    once you're done designing your icon, you use the export screen to export your icon.

  • Scaling Barcodes in KF5::Prison

    In the past couple of days I tried to finally address an issue in KDE Itinerary where UIC 918.3 train tickets could be rendered in a way that they weren’t accepted by the scanner. That turned into a journey into the depths of high DPI rendering inside KDE Frameworks’ barcode rendering library Prison.

  • Shortwave – First stable release

    Today, after nearly two years of development I’m very proud to say: The first stable version of Shortwave is now available! I have put a lot of time and effort into this project, now it is finally time to make it available for everyone Smile.

  • Christian Hergert: How to use Sysprof to…

    First off, before using Sysprof to improve the performance of a particular piece of software, make sure you’re compiling with flags that allow us to have enough information to unwind stack frames. Sysprof will use libunwind in some cases, but a majority of our stack unwinding is done by the Linux kernel which can currently only follow eh_frame (exception handling) information.

KDE and GNOME: Plasma Mobile, Krita, Gedit and GNOME Outreachy 2019

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Plasma Mobile update week 11 of 2020

    In contrast to our usual bi-weekly blog format, this post wraps up only the most important changes that happened while no post was released. We are sorry for the lack of news in this period of time, but the good news is that as you will see in this post, the long break was not caused by a lack of content, but by a lack of time to write the post.

  • Krita Weekly #12 | 4.2.9 beta released

    So, a lot has been going around these days, 2020 hasn't been the best year so far. Nevertheless don't panic, maintain proper hygiene and you should be fine for the most part.

    A couple of days back 4.2.9 beta was released, here a blog post detailing the release can be found. Tons of bug fixes and a bunch of new features are there, which leaves me nothing to write about them in the weekly.

    In the other news, we have been able to hire Emmet and Eoin to work on the animation subsystem part-time. Previously both have contributed to the code and also joined the rest of us in the last two yearly sprints. Here is the task that is being laid upon to be worked. And they also have started a survey for the folks interested in animation for Krita. The feedback would be helpful for us to decide which parts of the animation system need more attention.

  • gedit – 36 things to do and maybe planning a crowdfunding

    GNOME 3.36 has been released. And gedit 3.36 too!

    In the small corner of the Universe where I live, when we say “36” it actually means “a lot”. When we have 36 things to do today, or when we cannot do 36 things at the same time. In the case of gedit, there are also 36 things to do, as you can imagine.

    I now have more time that I can devote to GNOME, especially gedit. But I’m partly living on my savings.

  • End of GNOME Outreachy 2019

    The outreachy program ended the past week and we've done great improvements during this four months of work. I'm very happy with the result and with the work of the two interns and also the GNOME co-mentors that make this possible.

    If we're lucky the interns will continue contributing in the future and we can see the GNOME community growing in developers and diversity.

Building and testing GTK

Filed under
GNOME

Since GNOME’s collective move to GitLab, GTK has taken advantage of the features provided by that platform—especially when it comes to its continuous integration pipeline.

In days of old, the only way to check that our changes to the toolkit were correct was to wait until the Continuous build bot would notify us of any breakage on the main development branches. While this was better than nothing, it didn’t allow us to prevent breakage during the development phase of anything—from features to bug fixes, from documentation improvements to adding new tests.

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Linux-based “PinePhone” And “PineTab” Running The Latest GNOME 3.36

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

The mobile OS support capability of PinePhone and PineTab is increasing day by day. And to enhance its beauty and run things fluently, it already supports various desktop environments such as KDE neon, Plasma mobile, and GNOME.

In addition, you can now enjoy more features introduced in the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment, which runs pretty well on both PinePhone and PineTab. The latest GNOME brings highly-polished design and performance improvements to smoothen the user experience.

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More in Tux Machines

Remote support options for sysadmins

As a sysadmin, you do support—support for local users as level I, II, III, or all of the above. You might have even supported remote users. Maybe your office environment was once 100 percent local and you had no remote support duties. But now, your job might be completely supporting remote users and systems. Great news, huh? Well, there's hope. Using some great remote support tools, you can still do your job just as efficiently from a distance as you could with walk-up access. Sure, it's a little more difficult, but once you establish your support tools and workflow, you might never return to a traditional office. This article highlights support tools for a new age of remote support. Remote support is difficult. To get an idea of just how difficult it is, I've only known one person in more than twenty years of working as a sysadmin who actually enjoyed supporting remote users. It was great for the rest of the team because we could just reassign tickets to him and away he'd go on them. For the rest of us, we felt like we were trying to wash dishes from across the room without really seeing the dishes. These remote support options will help you support your users without the frustration of a click-by-click follow-along session. You'll be able to see everything that's going on or actually perform the work yourself. Read more

today's howtos

New GNOME Mobile Shell Mockups Tease a Tactile Future on Tablets

With Phosh, the mobile face of GNOME Shell, taking shape on phones it’s not a major leap to start thinking about how the GNOME user experience might function on larger screen sizes. Like, say a tablet. Despite some folks thinking that GNOME Shell is a touch-focused UI, it isn’t. In fact, it’s pretty tedious to use without a keyboard or a mouse. Same was true of Unity, RIP. To succeed in a finger-driven environment you need a finger-driven interface. Just like the one on show in “very experimental” concept images recently shared by GNOME designer Tobias Bernard on the GNOME design Gitlab. Tobias is lead UI/UX designer at Purism and works directly on Phosh. Read more Also in GNOME today: Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Timelines on Calendar

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, and Going Linux

  • LHS Episode #337: SDRAngel Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 337 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a deep dive into the shallow end of SDRAngel. The project is a GPLv3 licensed, modular front end and headless server for connecting to and operating SDR receivers and transceivers. Discussion includes where to find the software, how to build it, basic operation with broadcast FM stations, DMR, SSB, CW and more. Take a look. Try it out. Have fun with SDR. Hope you enjoy!

  • 2020-04-07 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft proposes a new Linux kernel security mechanism, Firefox 75 rolls out significant changes, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation adopts Argo, and The Linux Foundation aims to boost adoption of the seL4 secure microkernel.

  • Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback

    Bill burns out on distrohopping after providing multiple release reviews. Our listeners provide feedback on new user recommendations, hard drive mounting, encryption, trying Linux via USB, and the Linux Spotlight interview. We answer questions on security audit results. Episode 389 Time Stamps 00:00 Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback 01:43 Bill burns out on distro hopping 02:24 but he has some feedback on a few releases 02:46 Linux Mint 19.3 03:24 Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 04:38 Endevour OS 07:13 ArcoLinux 10:19 Open Suse 12:16 Ubuntu MATE 14:49 Zorin 17:55 New user recommendations 24:22 Gregory: Hard drive mounting 27:28 Gregory: Great interview 30:09 John: Security audit recommendations 34:19 George: Paul's encryption problem 37:57 David: Linux via USB 44:09 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe 45:17 End