Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Tagcloud

Filed under
GNOME

There is ongoing work on content-specific user interfaces that can work with Tracker to access local content, so for photos for example you can use GNOME Photos to view and organize your whole photo collection. However, there isn’t a content-agnostic tool available that might let you view and organize all the content on your computer… other than Nautilus which is limited to files and folders.

I’m interested in organizing content using tags, which are nothing but freeform textual category labels. On the web, tags are a very common way of categorizing content. (The name hashtags is probably more widely understood than tags among web users, but hashtag has connotations to social media and sharing which don’t necessarily apply when talking about desktop content so I will call them tags here.) Despite the popularity on the web, desktop support is low: Tagspaces seems to be the only option and the free edition is very limited in what it can do. Within GNOME, we have had support for storing tags in the Tracker database for many years but I don’t know of any applications that allow viewing or editing file tags.

Around the time of GUADEC 2017 I read Alexandru’s blog post about tags in Nautilus, in which he announced that Nautilus wasn’t going to get support for organizing files using tags because it would conflict to much with the existing organization principle in Nautilus of putting files into folders. I agree with that logic there, but it leaves open a question: when will GNOME get an interface that allows me to organize files using tags?

Read more

How to Use GNOME Shell’s Secret Screen Recorder

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

So you want to record your Ubuntu desktop, but you don’t know which desktop screen recorder to use?

Well, have you considered not using one at all?

Don’t look at me strangely: I promise this makes sense.

You’ve likely seen videos on YouTube where people share a screencast of their Linux desktops. Perhaps you want to join the fun. Well, you can, and you don’t need any special tools or separate screen recorder apps to do it.

Read more

GSoC Work on KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • GSoC’18 Week 2 && 3

    Thanks to Timothée Giet, for providing me the icons of different tools. We’ll be updating the remaining icons soon.

    We noticed some bugs with the default color picker, and decided to create our own Color picker, consisting of three bars –> Hue, Saturation and lightness to select the required color. This was a little difficult task for me at the beginning but finally managed to create this with the help of my mentors and resources on the internet.

  •  

  • Improving the reliability and usability of KStars

    The goal of my GSOC project to continue the improvements over the codebase what was started previous year. Improving the reliability and bring modern C++ features. I have the following goals for the first period to make KStars better:

  • GSoC 2018: Filter Infrastructure

    This summer I’m working on librsvg, a GNOME library for rendering SVG files, particularly on porting the SVG filter effects from C to Rust. That involves separating the code for different filters from one huge C file into individual files for each filter, and then porting the filter rendering infrastructure and the individual filters.

    Thankfully, in the large C file the code for different filters was divided by comment blocks, so several vim macros later I was done with the not so exciting splitting part.

3rd Party Software in Fedora Workstation

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

So you have probably noticed by now that we started offering some 3rd party software in the latest Fedora Workstation namely Google Chrome, Steam, NVidia driver and PyCharm. This has come about due to a long discussion in the Fedora community on how we position Fedora Workstation and how we can improve our user experience. The principles we base of this policy you can read up on in this policy document. To sum it up though the idea is that while the Fedora operating system you install will continue as it has been for the last decade to be based on only free software (with an exception for firmware) you will be able to more easily find and install the plethora of applications out there through our software store application, GNOME Software. We also expect that as the world of Linux software moves towards containers in general and Flatpaks specifically we will have an increasing number of these 3rd party applications available in Fedora.

Read more

GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

Filed under
Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

Read more

GNOME: Security vulnerability in Epiphany, Nautilus File Operations and More

Filed under
GNOME
  • Security vulnerability in Epiphany Technology Preview

    If you use Epiphany Technology Preview, please update immediately and ensure you have revision 3.29.2-26 or newer. We discovered and resolved a vulnerability that allowed websites to access internal Epiphany features and thereby exfiltrate passwords from the password manager. We apologize for this oversight.

    The unstable Epiphany 3.29.2 release is the only affected release. Epiphany 3.29.1 is not affected. Stable releases, including Epiphany 3.28, are also not affected.

  • Nautilus File Operations

    While unit tests are meant to be fairly short and simple, tackling individual instances of a functionality or component, Nautilus would not really allow us to do that. Due to Nautilus’ nature and its tight relation to I/O operations, unit testing for us meant cherry-picking the simpler functions which we use and testing these. However, for the larger, more important components, we’d rely on integration tests, which represented one of the following items on our list.

  • 23rd of April

    Lo and behold (not as surprising as it was for me considering I am writing this) my project had been accepted and I was about to start my bonding period as an official member and contributor under the GNOME community!

    I doubt I’ll soon (if ever) forget the feelings I went through as I saw my name listed there. At first, I could not find myself. The GNOME projects list kept going and going, I even went past my fellow Nautilus GSOC’er project and would not see my name. Eventually, I saw it, “Tests, profiling and debug framework for Nautilus” with my name on top of it. It just felt both rewarding (as I had been contributing to Nautilus for a while up to that point) and relaxing, knowing I would get to contribute to something I use on my day-to-day work and alongside the people I got to learn so much from, all whilst being a part a of a huge project, whose name is familiar to millions of users.

KDE and GNOME: This Week in Usability & Productivity, Krita, Pitivi and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 21

    Another week, another dose of Usability and Productivity in KDE land! We picked up a lot of great improvements to Discover, a much-requested change to allow Kate and Dolphin to be run with the root user account again, and quite a lot of important bugfixes.

  • A Progression of Drawing Devices

    Some time ago, I compared 2:1 devices, which was a new form factor back then. This time, triggered by an experiment with a Wacom Mobile Studio Pro during the last Krita sprint, I want to look into the various drawing devices I’ve used over the years, and which ones worked well, or not.

  • Other People’s Work

    Most of my writing on this blog is about FreeBSD, KDE, or Calamares. So it gives a bit of a one-sided view of what I do. There’s lots of pictures of rhubarb crumble, for instance, that never see the bloggy light-of-day. But I can build more than just software! Two months ago an unusually heavy storm blew down part of the fence in my back yard, which wasn’t really good for the privacy of that yard.

  • Not just Krita at the 2018 Krita Sprint

    At the 2018 Krita Sprint we had a special guest: Valeriy Malov, the maintainer of the Plasma Wacom tablet settings module. We’ve asked him to write about his experience at the sprint, so over to him!

    Hello,

    This is my Krita 2018 sprint report and general report / pre-release announcement for new version of wacomtablet.

  • Bringing slow motion to Pitivi

    Last year, I worked on the project ‘Pitivi: Color correction interface using three chromatic wheels’ as part of my Google Summer of Code. This year again, I’m working on Pitivi under the GNOME organisation. Mathieu Duponchellle and Thibault Saunier are mentoring my project this time.

  • Input Event Handling in Nautilus

    Gestures like these is now how almost all input is handled in Nautilus. The exception is the stuff that has no event controller counterpart in GTK+ 3.

    This summer I’m working on porting Nautilus to GTK+ 4 as part of Google Summer of Code, and I’ve spent the entirety of the time on getting rid of deprecated 3.x API and obsolete ways of handling events. Despite slightly hack-ish ways of working around deprecations, it’s been smooth sailing so far – No Regressions™! Almost ready to switch†!

GNOME: Project of the Week, Room Directory, Pitivi and Bug Tracking versus User Support

Filed under
GNOME
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: GNOME

    The GNOME Foundation says the move to GitLab will help improve workflow and tools as well as support, grow and collaborate with other free software communities. The GNOME project consists of more than 400 software projects and about 900 annual contributors.

    The foundation recently announced GNOME 3 with an activities overview to view basic tasks; new productivity features such as search and side-by-side; updated messaging system; performance enhancements; and the ability to access all your data in one place.

  • Improving the performance of the room directory

    For now, when we are searching for rooms with the “Default Servers” option, we are requesting 10 rooms from the homeserver for each protocol (by “protocol”, I mean non-Matrix protocols that are bridged to the user’s home servers, like IRC, Gitter, Slack, etc…) that is bridged to the homeserver. This can be quite slow. For instance, we are fetching about 100 rooms from the homeserver “matrix.org” even if we would need to show to the user only 20 of them. This is really bad regarding the performance of the application, furthermore because we have to download/generate the avatar of each room loaded.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi

    I will be working on Pitivi as my Google Summer of Code 2018 project under GNOME. One of the major task in my project is to integrate the current Welcome dialog box of Pitivi into it’s main window and display projects in a more informative, discoverable, and user friendly layout.

    Currently when Pitivi starts, a Welcome dialog appears that displays the recent projects and some buttons for creating a new project, browsing projects, etc. This dialog box needs to be integrated into the main window.

  • Engineering Journals vs User Support

    A major thanks to everyone involved in the gitlab migration. It’s no doubted a huge leap forward for GNOME on so many fronts.

    Before we lose that momentum, I’d like to bring up in the collective minds of our project, what I consider, a separate problem. That is Bug Tracking versus User Support.

    [...]

    We generally don’t have this focus in F/OSS. It requires a set of skills that many of us have not cultivated and probably should. In addition, we should encourage those that already have these skills to join us.

    But that raises the question: is gitlab the right place to do user support?

    If GNOME were to advance Free Software by taking user support to the next level, what would that look like and what tooling do we need? Is that worth investing in now that we have many applications to support in addition to the desktop plumbing?

    Hopefully we can have some discussion about that on the beach in Almería, Spain for GUADEC 2018.

GNOME: GUADEC, Fractal and GSoC

Filed under
GNOME
  • GUADEC under the sea

    I’m planning to do a day trip to go scuba diving at GUADEC this year. If you’d like to join me, drop me an email or find me on IRC. There’s a few of us interested in going, so the more, the better! This is not an official GUADEC event.

  • Redesigning the room directory of Fractal

    I have been working on the redesign of the room directory since I finished my first task. In this article, I will talk about the room directory (how it works and which improvements was needed), what I have done to improve it and some of the issues that are yet to be solved.

  • Fractal: a GNOME Matrix chat client

    Matrix is a protocol for decentralized instant messaging that has recently grown in popularity. Matrix can be used for a wide range of communication tasks, such as group chats, video chats, sharing files, and bridging to existing IRC rooms. One of the easiest ways to use Matrix is the RiotIM web client or desktop application. However, Fractal is a Matrix desktop application designed for GNOME, so it arguably feels a lot more at home on Fedora Workstation, as seen here:

  • [Old] How I got drawn into GSoC 2018?
  • [Old] Simple and robust algorithm for video thumbnail generation

    The simplest algorithm that comes to mind for generating a thumbnail for a video is to randomly pick a frame in the video (even simpler could be to just pick the first frame of the video). While the algorithm is very intuitive and looks good at first glance, it has one problem – it can pick a monotonous frame, like an all black frame, which obviously is not a good thumbnail because it doesn’t convey any information regarding the video.

    A good heuristic algorithm (referred from this stackoverflow post) to tackle this problem is to select a few random frames (let say, 5) in the video and pick the frame that has largest file size as video thumbnail – the idea being that the JPEG of a monotonous frame will compress into much smaller file than that of an interesting frame (one with lots of objects and colors).

  • A summer with GNOME

    Within just a few days, I fell in love with the simplicity of the code and the very supportive community of GNOME. My mentors, Ardien Plazas and Abhinav Singh were especially helpful and helped me get on track, by closely watching them handle the code with utmost care and simplicity, it quickly began apparent to me that more than developing a software, they were developing an art. I promptly began to understand the codebase and fix bugs as fast as I could. Encouraged by my friend, Sagar and already in love with GNOME Games, I applied for GSoC.

GNOME: Fractal, PulseAudio, GStreamer

Filed under
GNOME
  • Fractal GSoC Progress

    In the last two weeks I have been working on the user account settings for Fractal. I can’t wait to get to the point where Fractal will work stand-alone without needing to use Riot for certain things, and getting complete account settings is a major step in that direction.

  • Meet Tanu Kaskinen, PulseAudio maintainer

    Hello, my name is Tanu Kaskinen and I’m a PulseAudio maintainer (and also involved in the OpenEmbedded project a little bit). I spent my childhood in Järvenpää, Finland, and moved to Tampere when I started my software engineering studies at Tampere University of Technology. I’ve been living here ever since (13 years, if my calculations are correct).

  • GStreamer Spring 2018 Hackfest Remarks – author’s note

    Had the pleasure to attend the GStramer Spring Hackfest taking place between May 6 – May 4 in Lund Sweden, here follow some reflections.

    There likely no overstatement that multimedia development is probably one of the more complex areas of software development so to be present while what must be some of the more competent in the domain hacking was quite an experience.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: PDS, VKMS and Nouveau

  • PDS 0.98s release
    PDS 0.98s is released with the following changes 1. Fix compilation issue on raspberry pi. 2. Minor rework and optimization on balance code path. 3. Fix wrong nr_max_tries in migrate_pending_tasks. This is mainly a bug fix and minor optimization release for 4.17. The rework of balance code doesn't go well, it actually make more overhead than current implement. Another rework which based on current implement is still on going, hopefully be included in next release.
  • PDS-MQ CPU Scheduler Revised For The Linux 4.17 Kernel With Minor Optimizations
    Alfred Chen announced this week the release of PDS-mq 0.98s, his latest patch-set of this CPU scheduler against the Linux 4.17 upstream code-base and includes minor optimization work and bug fixes. The PDS scheduler stands for the "Priority and Deadline based Skiplist multiple queue scheduler" that is derived from Con Kolivas' former BFS scheduler with Variable Run Queue (VRQ) support. PDS design principles are to be a simple CPU process scheduler yet efficient and scalable. PDS-mq differs from Con Kolivas' current MuQSS scheduler.
  • Add infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events in vkms simulated by hrtimer
    Since the beginning of May 2018, I have been diving into the DRM subsystem. In the beginning, nothing made sense to me, and I had to fight hard to understand how things work. Fortunately, I was not alone, and I had great support from Gustavo Padovan, Daniel Vetter, Haneen Mohammed, and the entire community. Recently, I finally delivered a new feature for VKMS: the infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events. At this moment, VKMS have regular Vblank events simulated through hrtimers (see drm-misc-next), which is a feature required by VKMS to mimic real hardware [6]. The development approach was entirely driven by the tests provided by IGT, more specifically the kms_flip. I modified IGT to read a module name via command line and force the use of it, instead of using only the modules defined in the code (patch submitted to IGT, see [1]). With this modification in the IGT, my development process to add a Vblank infrastructure to VKMS had three main steps as Figure 1 describes.
  • The State Of The VKMS Driver, Preparations For vBlank & Page Flip Events
    One of the exciting additions to look forward to with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle is the virtual "VKMS" kernel mode-setting driver. The driver is still a work-in-progress, but multiple developers are working on it.
  • NIR Continues To Be Prepped For OpenCL Support
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst who joined Red Hat several months ago has been working on Nouveau NIR support as stepping towards SPIR-V/compute support and this summer the work very much remains an active target.
  • Nouveau Gallium3D Moves Closer Towards OpenGL 4.5 Compliance
    While the RadeonSI and Intel i965 Mesa drivers have been at OpenGL 4.5 compliance for a while now, the Nouveau "NVC0" Gallium3D driver has been bound to OpenGL 4.3 officially. This Nouveau Gallium3D driver for NVIDIA "Fermi" graphics hardware and newer has effectively supported all of the OpenGL 4.4/4.5 extensions, but not officially. Originally the NVC0 problem for OpenGL 4.4 and newer was the requirement of passing the OpenGL Conformance Test Suite (CTS), which at first wasn't open-source. But now The Khronos Group has made it available to everyone as open-source. Additionally, the proper legal wrangling is in place so the Nouveau driver could become a conforming Khronos adopter under the X.Org Foundation without any associated costs/fees with Nouveau being purely open-source and primarily considered a community driver.

DistroWatch The Best Website For Distro Hoppers

The DistroWatch features release announcements of new versions of hundreds of Linux and other distributions. It does host reviews of distros, podcasts, and newsletters. DistroWatch first published by Ladislav Bodnar, the founder, and maintainer, on May 31, 2001. DistroWatch initially focused on Linux distributions. But later based on user requests, it went on adding different flavors of operating systems like BSD family, Android x86, Oracle Solaris, MINIX, and Haiku etc. The DistroWatch presents detailed information at one place in a very convenient manner. At the time of writing this article, the DistroWatch hosted information of more than 300 active distributions (referring the list of distros populated under drop-down feature on the first page of the DistroWatch) and more than hundred in queue. It is said that the DistroWatch lives out of advertising and donation. LinuxCD.org is the first to advertise on the DistroWatch site. Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS Amazon Linux AMIs Now Support Amazon's SSM Agent

As of July 2018, Amazon's Linux AMIs (Amazon Machine Images) that are based on either the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) or Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems now come pre-installed with the AWS Systems Manager Agent (SSM Agent), an Amazon software designed to run on hybrid or Amazon EC2 instances in public and private clouds on AWS (Amazon Web Services). "With this new feature release, AWS Systems Manager Agent is installed by default on all instances launched or built from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (2018.07 and later) and 18.04 LTS (all versions) AMIs," said Amazon. "By having the agent pre-installed, you can quickly start using AWS Systems Manager features such as Run Command, State Manager, Inventory and Patch Manager." Read more

today's howtos