Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish


GNOME: PipeWire and CSD Initiative

Filed under
  • An update on Pipewire – the multimedia revolution – an update

    We launched PipeWire last September with this blog entry. I thought it would be interesting for people to hear about the latest progress on what I believe is going to be a gigantic step forward for the Linux desktop. So I caught up with Pipewire creator Wim Taymans during DevConf 2018 in Brno where Wim is doing a talk about Pipewire and we discussed the current state of the code and Wim demonstrated a few of the things that PipeWire now can do.

  • PipeWire Is Making Progress But Still Needs More Time To Mature

    PipeWire was announced last year as a new Red Hat projects with aspirations to be to video as PulseAudio is to audio on the Linux desktop. Other PipeWire goals include professional audio support equal to or better than JACK, full Wayland/Flatpak support, and more. Red Hat is making a lot of progress on PipeWire, but it's not yet ready to be the default on the Linux desktop.

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has shared a status update on PipeWire after discussing the latest state with PipeWire creator Wim Taymans.

  • Introducing the CSD Initiative

    Unless you’re one of a very lucky few, you probably use apps with title bars. In case you’ve never come across that term, title bars are the largely empty bars at the top of some application windows. They contain only the window title and a close button, and are completely separate from the window’s content. This makes them very inflexible, as they can not contain any additional UI elements, or integrate with the application window’s content.

  • The CSD Initiative Is Pushing For Apps To Abandon Title Bars In Favor Of Header Bars

    GNOME developer Tobias Bernard has announced "The CSD Initiative" in a push for more applications to support client-side decorations and as part of that to abandon boring title bars in favor of modern header bars.

    By using client-side decorations (CSD) rather than server-side decorations, applications are able to draw their own title/header bars and that makes for more interesting possibilities to save precious screen real estate and be more innovative about packing additional functionality into what otherwise would be a rather empty bar on the screen.

It Just Got Easier to Try the Latest WebKit on Linux

Filed under

If you’ve been itching to toy with the latest development builds of WebKit on Linux you’ll be pleased to know it’s just gotten a bit easier.

It’s all thanks to the newly announced ‘Epiphany Technology Preview‘, a development version of the Epiphany web browser (also known as GNOME Web) running atop the latest WebKitGTK+ snapshot.

Read more

Also: GNOME at FOSDEM 2018 – with socks and more!

Epiphany/WebKitGTK+ Nightlies

Filed under
  • Announcing Epiphany Technology Preview

    If you use macOS, the best way to use a recent development snapshot of WebKit is surely Safari Technology Preview. But until now, there’s been no good way to do so on Linux, short of running a development distribution like Fedora Rawhide.

    Enter Epiphany Technology Preview. This is a nightly build of Epiphany, on top of the latest development release of WebKitGTK+, running on the GNOME master Flatpak runtime. The target audience is anyone who wants to assist with Epiphany development by testing the latest code and reporting bugs, so I’ve added the download link to Epiphany’s development page.

  • Epiphany Tech Preview Delivers Flatpak'ed WebKitGTK+ Browser Daily

    Thanks to several efforts coming together, there's now an Epiphany Technology Preview project delivering you a bleeding-edge GNOME web-browser in a sane and easily deployable manner.

    Epiphany Technology Preview delivers the latest Epiphany browser code built atop the latest development release of WebKitGTK+ and is updated on a nightly basis.

GNOME: Mutter and Engagements

Filed under
  • GNOME's Mutter Now Supports GBM With Modifiers - Allowing Tiling & Compression

    Landing today in GNOME's Mutter Git tree are some longstanding patches by Collabora's Daniel Stone for supporting the Generic Buffer Manager (GBM) with buffer modifiers for DRM.

    By Mutter supporting buffer modifiers when its serving as a Wayland compositor, it can now support tiling and compression of scanout surfaces when passing to the DRM drivers via Mesa's GBM.

  • Meet Øyvind Kolås, GEGL maintainer extraordinaire

    Last month, we had the pleasure of interviewing Øyvind Kolås, aka “pippin,” about his work on GEGL — a fundamental technology enabling GIMP and GNOME Photos.

  • Meet Shobha Tyagi from GNOME.Asia Summit 2016

    Shobha’s history with GNOME began when she participated in the Outreach Program for Women (OPW) internship in December 2013, with GNOME as her mentoring organization. She attended her first GUADEC in 2014 while she was an OPW intern, and met Emily Chen, who introduced her to the GNOME.Asia Summit.

    Passionate about helping to spread GNOME throughout Asia, Shobha was resolute to rise to the challenge of bringing GNOME.Asia Summit to her home in Delhi, India. Fast-forward two years, Shobha is proudly leading the local organizing team of GNOME.Asia, which is ready to lift its curtain in Delhi, on April 21, 2016.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

Filed under

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14.

Read more

GNOME: Belated GUADEC Report, "Is GNOME Just Lazy?"

Filed under
  • Alberto Ruiz: GUADEC 2017: GNOME’s Renaissance

    This is a blog post I kept as a draft right after GUADEC to reflect on it and the GNOME project but failed to finish and publish until now. Forgive any outdated information though I think the post is mostly relevant still.

    I’m on my train back to London from Manchester, where I just spent 7 amazing days with my fellow GNOME community members. Props to the local team for an amazing organization, everything went smoothly and people seemed extremely pleased with the setup as far as I can tell and the venues seemed to have worked extremely well. I mostly want to reflect on a feeling that I have which is that GNOME seems to be experiencing a renaissance in the energy and focus of the community as well as the broader interest from other players.

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.5 | Is GNOME Just Lazy?

    GNOME is dropping Active Desktop, Ubuntu is holding back Nautilus and I have been writing a lot of scripts.

A Beginner's Guide to the GNOME Desktop

Filed under

Of all the desktops available for the Linux operating system, GNOME has managed to become on of the most efficient, stable, and reliable—while still remaining incredibly user-friendly. In fact, most users—regardless of experience—can get up to speed with GNOME with next to no effort.

With that said, users who are new to both Linux and GNOME would do best to know the ins and outs of the desktop that makes Linux not only easy, but fun.

Here, we’ll be discussing the latest release of GNOME—3.26. This will be a vanilla release (unlike the version of GNOME found in Ubuntu 17.10—which bears a similar look and feel to the now-defunct Ubuntu Unity desktop). To get this vanilla GNOME, we’ve opted to demonstrate with the Fedora 27 workstation. Although Fedora isn’t a distribution commonly thought of for new users, it is one sure-fire way to have the newest version of the desktop.

And so, without further ado, let’s talk GNOME.

Read more

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

Filed under
  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2

    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...

  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma

    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

    Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.

  • Builder happenings for January

    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors.

    I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

Filed under
  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes

    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes.

    If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!

  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland

    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor.

    Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.

  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD

    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release.

    In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

KDE and GNOME Development: Discover, librsvg, GNOME Photos

Filed under
  • This week in Discover

    I guess I’m becoming a Discover developer, since it’s where I seem to spend most of my time these days. It’s just so darn fun since the lead Developer Aleix Pol is super easy to work with, there’s a lot of low-hanging fruit, and with Kirigami, it’s very simple to make consequential changes even when you’re a novice programmer and not very familiar with the codebase. That said, Aleix is still making about 99% of the code changes, and I’m mostly doing UI tweaks, bug screening, promotion, strategy, and work with apps to get their houses in order.

  • Help needed for librsvg 2.42.1

    I have prepared a list of bugs which I'd like to be fixed in the 2.42.1 milestone. Two of them are assigned to myself, as I'm already working on them.

  • GNOME Photos: Happenings
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Fresh Benchmarks Of CentOS 7 On Xeon & EPYC With/Without KPTI/Retpolines

While every few weeks or so we have ended up running benchmarks of the latest Linux Git kernel to see the evolving performance impact of KPTI (Kernel Page Table Isolation) and Retpolines for Meltdown and Spectre V2 mitigation, respectively, a request came in last week from a premium supporter to see some new comparison test runs on CentOS 7 with its older 3.10-evolved kernel. Read more

Reviewing logins on Linux

The last command provides an easy way to review recent logins on a Linux system. It also has some useful options –- such as looking for logins for one particular user or looking for logins in an older wtmp file. The last command with no arguments will easily show you all recent logins. It pulls the information from the current wtmp (/var/log/wtmp) file and shows the logins in reverse sequential order (newest first). Read more

Today in Techrights

Feed the dog and close the door with an open source home automation system

As voice assistants, smart bulbs, and other devices increasingly become household staples, more people than ever are bringing smart technology into their homes. But the bewildering assortment of products on the market can present challenges: Remembering which app to use and trying to link things together with automation can get complicated quickly. In this article, I’ll show you a few ways I used an open source home automation platform, Home Assistant, to bring all my devices together. Read more