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GNOME

KDE and GNOME: Developing KDE PIM with Docker, GObject Introspection, GNOME 3.26 Days Away

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Developing KDE PIM with Docker

    Getting started with contributing to KDE PIM can be hard – we have nearly 60 repositories with complicated dependencies – just getting that right can discourage many people from even trying. And then there’s, of course, the risk factor of running development build alongside your production Kontact, endangering your precious emails.

    To address all these issues I have created a Docker image. It’s based on the KDE Neon Developer edition and it has all the dependencies pre-installed and pre-configured and comes with a set of handy shell scripts to make your life easier. It also has the environment set up properly so that you can run the development build of Kontact inside of the container – completely isolated from your production installation.

    Interested now? Follow the instructions how to build the Docker image and how to run the container on our KDE PIM Docker wiki page.

  • The Magic of GObject Introspection

    When we started GNOME in 1997, we didn't want to write all of it in C. We had some inspiration from elsewhere.

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  • Approaching 3.26

    So, we're on final stretch towards the GNOME 3.26 release next week, just released the last beta of Maps (3.25.92) earlier in the week. This cycle hasn't seen that any real ground-breaking user-visible changes. But various smaller bugfixes. Nevertheless there's been a few nice improvements on the surface (as seen in earlier blogposts).

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 10

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

It’s time for the 10th update iteration on how we are progressing in your new GNOME Shell Ubuntu Artful default session. This one is about Control Center updates to latest GNOME version. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME: GNOME Mutter, GNOME 3.26, and Support more than one Build System (Meson and Autotools)

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 Adds Built-In Screencast / Remote Desktop Capabilities

    GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 has been released and it incorporates some interesting changes for the end of the GNOME 3.26 development cycle.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Up to RC State, Launches on September 13

    GNOME Project's Javier Jardón announced a few moments ago that the GNOME 3.25.92 milestone of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now available for public testing, marking the end of the development cycle.

    GNOME 3.26 has been in development since early April, and it's now up to RC (Release Candidate) state, which means that the development cycle is over and the team will begin preparations for the final release of the highly anticipated desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Support more than one Build System

    I’ve tried to add Meson build system to MyHTML, but fail. They prefer the one is used today. That’s OK.

    Support two build systems increase burden on project maintenance, this is the main reason to reject my pull request and is OK. As for GXml, we have both Autotools and Meson. I’m trying to keep both in sync, as soon as a new file is added, but you may forget one or the other.

    While I use GXml on my Windows programs, I need to make sure it will work properly out of the box, like Autotools does, before to remove the later.

GNOME and KDE: System Settings Progress, Akademy Results, and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • System Settings Progress

    I would like to provide some information on working with System Settings. This is a big endeavor and not an easy one. System Settings is a good expression of the power of KDE and also the many influences that have shaped it over the years.

    Trying to untangle the work that has gone into System Settings requires time and patience. I have always been interested in working in revamping this UI. We worked with the team in the VDG on this some time ago, and altough there were many great and interesting changes, the scope of the work was too great. Therefore, we decided only to move forward with those things that were achievable at the time.

  • Akademy Results

    At the beginning of the summer I went to Akademy in Almeria. So what did it bring, in terms of development? I can point to the FreeBSD-on-KDE-Slimbook posts as one technical result of Akademy, although I suppose I could have just had the machine shipped to me, too. (There need to be more posts about the laptop, as FreeBSD support for it improves; I must admit I’ve been a little lax in hacking on that).

  • Move status icons to your GNOME top bar

    However, there are also free and open source apps with the same issues. These apps haven’t been updated to use newer features when installed in a GNOME environment like Fedora Workstation.

  • GTK, Python, WebKit and Latex Workshops on Fedora 26

    This afternoon, we did two workshops at PUCP, one to present and code in GTK and the other to work with Latex, each one lasted an hour. Thanks to the organizers of INFOSOFT 2017 for the opportunity to share free Software tools to people. This event was free to everyone and we did a volunteer job as a group to promote Fedora and the GNOMe project in our local community.

  • Paying for FOSS apps

    There’s been an ongoing topic in the GNOME community about how developers can get some money for their apps. From a fixed price to pay-what-you-want or donations, getting people to pay for software as end users is not easy. This is true even if you’re selling software through a mainstream platform like Google Play or the Apple Appstore, let alone if you’re a Free Software developer and you are relying on donations from your users.

    Even if you’re willing to donate a couple of euros for supporting an app you’re about to install, you’ll have to go through the trouble of finding out how to make the donation. This may involve: 1) going to the app developer’s website; 2) finding out whether they accept donations; 3) hope they receive donations through a service you already use (PayPal, bank transfer, Bitcoin, etc.) and perform the donation.
    During GUADEC, Richard Hughes organized a discussion around the problems of getting donations through GNOME Software. And now the GNOME app center has a “donate” button for apps that declare a donation link.

GNOME: LAS GNOME, GNOME-Shell, and GUADEC

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GNOME
  • #LASGNOME

    This is a long overdue blog post, that should’ve, ideally, been written a week ago, while it was most fresh in my mind. From my own observations of everything that went on during the conference, together with the good feedbacks and reviews we received from the participants, I dare say the first Libre Application Summit, hosted by GNOME (“LAS GNOME”) transpired successfully. So I admit, after a week of keeping myself on my toes, I arrived home, and basked in the afterglow of the success of the very first edition of LAS GNOME.

  • Fedora26, jhbuild and gnome-shell

    Ok, so in my previous previous post I wrote about not being able to restore my build in time. Given the fact that reinstalling the OS would take more time, I took a shot at rebuilding gnome-shell (with the beloved jhbuild, of course) inside a virtual machine, on a Fedora26 OS.

    This was the first step towards fixing my issue. As you will see, this post aims at helping newcomers install gnome-shell on their machines by describing all the issues that I encountered while building.

    First thing you want to do is read the jhbuild guide that can be found here and then install jhbuild.

  • My first GUADEC experience

    One long plane ride and two trains later, I finally arrived in Karlsruhe, three evenings earlier than Day 1 of GUADEC since Cosimo was participating in the Board and AdBoard meetings. As we checked-in at the Achat Plaza Hotel, the first familiar face we saw was Jeff. I had been working on the Foundation’s FY 2015 Annual Report closely with Jeff, Zana and Nuritzi for the past few months and I was excited to get my hands on a printed copy of the report; Jeff actually checked in a ~20kg luggage filled with the reports!

GNOME/GTK: WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92, GTK Python, GNOME 'Manchester' Coming Soon

Filed under
GNOME
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92 Brings Improved Wayland Support

    The WebKitGTK+ build of the WebKit rendering engine for GNOME desktop applications has seen measurable Wayland improvements ahead of this month's GNOME 3.28 debut.

  • Working with Buttons and Labels with GTK Python

    We have another meeting with the GNOME + Fedora local group in Lima, Peru to prepare ourselves in coding to offer better workshops and conferences.

  • A Late GUADEC 2017 Post

    It’s been a little over a month since I got back from Manchester, and this post should’ve come out earlier but I’ve been swamped.

    The conference was absolutely lovely, the organisation were a 110% on point (serious kudos, I know first hand how hard that is). Others on Planet GNOME have written extensively about the talks, the social events, and everything in between that made it a great experience. What I would like to write about is about why this year’s GUADEC was special to me.

Here's What Ubuntu 17.10's Default GNOME Shell Theme and Login Screen Look Like

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Soon after it entered Feature Freeze development stage on August 24, 2017, the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is yet to receive a polished and final default desktop session which resembles that of previous releases running Unity.

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Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 9

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

A very visual update today on our new Artful default session! This one is, as promised about our new GNOME Shell theme and you can see below some examples of those changes. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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Events: GNOME 3.26 "Manchester", GUADEC 2017, Randa Roundup, and SRECon17 Europe

Filed under
KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Waiting for GNOME 3.26 Stable Release!

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" planned to be released at 13 September 2017. Reading the FeaturePlans and Schedule from its wiki makes me want to run it sooner! I hope Ubuntu will successfully include 3.26 on Artful Aardvark release so I can make a review for it later. However, this short article mentions some of its new feature, new apps, some links from GUADEC 2017's participants, and further GNOME links. Enjoy!

  • GNOME GUADEC 2017: Presentations, Videos, & Links

    GUADEC 2017, the latest GNOME Project annual conference, has been held at 28 July-2 August 2017 in Manchester, United Kingdom. I collect as many resources as possible here including presentations & videos (so you can download them), poster & template, write-ups by attendees, and of course the links about GUADEC 2017. So, if you didn't attend GUADEC 2017, you still can find the resources here! Enjoy!

  • Randa Roundup - Part I

    Our intrepid developers are getting ready to make their way to Randa, and we are gradually finding out what they will be doing up there in the Swiss mountains.

    As Valorie said in a recent blog post, accessibility is useful for everybody at some point or another. Clear, highly contrasted icons, easy to reach keyboard shortcuts, and scalable fonts are things we can all appreciate most of the time, whether we have any sort of physical disability or not.

    With that in mind, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle will be working on Kdenlive, KDE's video editing software. He'll be reviewing the user interface; that is, the different panels, toolbars, etc., to make it easier to use for people who start editing for the first time. He'll also be working on packaging - creating AppImages and Flatpaks - so the latest versions of Kdenlive can be installed anywhere without having to worry about dependencies.

  • Takeaways from SRECon17 Europe

    As every last three years in a row, I attended SRECon in Europe. I can literally say this year was totally broken comparing with former conferences. I think it’s because I had much higher expectations from this conference. The first shot in 2014 was more than awesome, but year to year it’s getting worse. Almost all talks from Google were like a summary of every chapter in SRE book. We just skipped all the rest of the talks sourced by Google.

Status Icons and GNOME

Filed under
GNOME

“Status icons” go by a few different names. A lot of people know them by the area where they appear, which gets described as the “system tray” or “notification area”. Whatever you call it, it’s the place where a string of little icons often gets shown, typically by applications that are running in the background.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Canada’s Spy Agency Releases its Cyber-Defense Tool for Public
  • Canadian govt spooks open source anti-malware analytics tool
    The Communications Security Establishment (CSE) said the AssemblyLine tool is designed to analyse large volumes of files, and can automatically rebalance workloads.
  • Microservices served on blockchain, in open source
    Cloud application marketplace company Wireline is working with open source blockchain project developer Qtum The new union is intended to provide a conduit to consuming microservices at [web] scale using blockchain at the core. As we know, microservices offer the ability to create Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) without having to manage the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. [...] The Qtum a blockchain application platform combines the functions of Bitcoin Core, an account abstraction layer allowing for multiple virtual machines and a proof-of-stake consensus protocol aimed at tackling industry-use cases. The Qtum Foundation, headquartered in Singapore, is the decision-making body that drives the project’s development.
  • Rendering HTML5 video in Servo with GStreamer
    At the Web Engines Hackfest in A Coruña at the beginning of October 2017, I was working on adding some proof-of-concept code to Servo to render HTML5 videos with GStreamer. For the impatient, the results can be seen in this video here
  • Working Intel CET Bits Now Land In GCC8
    A few days back I wrote about Intel's work on Control-flow Enforcement Technology beginning to land in GCC. This "CET" work for future Intel CPUs has now landed in full for GCC 8. The bits wiring up this control-flow instrumentation and enforcement support are now all present in mainline GCC SVN/Git for next year's GCC 8.1 release.
  • Using Gitea and/or Github to host blog comments
    After having moved from FSFE’s wordpress instance I thought long about whether I still want to have comments on the new blog. And how I would be able to do it with a statically generated site. I think I have found/created a pretty good solution that I document below.

Security Leftovers

  • Where Did That Software Come From?
    The article explores how cryptography, especially hashing and code signing, can be use to establish the source and integrity. It examines how source code control systems and automated build systems are a key part of the software provenance story. (Provenance means “a record of ownership of a work of art or an antique, used as a guide to authenticity or quality.” It is increasingly being applied to software.)
  • Judge: MalwareTech is no longer under curfew, GPS monitoring [Updated]
    A judge in Milwaukee has modified the pre-trial release conditions of Marcus Hutchins, also known online as "MalwareTech," who was indicted two months ago on federal criminal charges. Under US Magistrate Judge William Duffin’s Thursday order, Hutchins, who is currently living in Los Angeles, will no longer be subject to a curfew or to GPS monitoring.
  • [Older] Leicester teen tries to hack CIA and FBI chiefs' computers
    A teenager attempted to hack senior US government officials' computers from his home. Kane Gamble, 18, from Coalville, Leicestershire, pleaded guilty to 10 charges relating to computer hacking. His targets included the then CIA director John Brennan and former FBI deputy director Mark Giuliano.

Debian: pk4, Freexian and More

Kernel and Graphics: ZenStates, AMDGPU, RADV, Vulkan, NVIDIA

  • ZenStates Allows Adjusting Zen P-States, Other Tweaking Under Linux
    ZenStates is an independent effort to offer P-States-based overclocking from the Linux desktop of AMD Ryzen processors and other tuning. ZenStates-Linux is an open-source Python script inspired by some available Windows programs for offering Ryzen/Zen CPU overclocking from the desktop by manipulating the performance states of the processor.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets A Final Batch Of Changes Before Linux 4.15
    The AMDGPU DC display code has a final batch of feature updates that were sent in this weekend for DRM-Next staging and is the last set besides fixes for the "DC" code for the 4.15 target.
  • Valve Developer Lands VK_EXT_global_priority For RADV Vulkan Driver
  • Vulkan 1.0.64 Adds In Another AMD-Developed Extension
    Vulkan 1.0.64 is out this weekend as the newest specification refinement to this high-performance graphics/compute API. As usual, most of the changes for this minor Vulkan revision are just documentation clarifications and corrections. This week's update brings just under a dozen fixes.
  • NVIDIA TX2 / Tegra186 Display Support Isn't Ready For Linux 4.15
    While the Jetson TX2 has been out since this past March and it's a phenomenal ARM development board, sadly the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver support for it still isn't ready with the mainline Linux kernel. Thierry Reding of NVIDIA sent in the Tegra DRM driver changes for DRM-Next that in turn is staged for Linux 4.15. Reding commented that there is prepatory work for the TX2 (Tegra186) but it's not all ready for upstream yet.