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GNOME

GNOME Shares Designs for a Native Camera App

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GNOME

The GNOME connection is even evident on the desktop thanks to the increased use of libhandy, an open source library that helps developers craft responsive GTK apps e.g., Lollypop,). These look like proper desktop apps on a regular screen but squish down nicely when used on a mobile one.

What do both a phone and desktop have in common? A camera!

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GTK 3.98

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GNOME

A few days ago, I’ve released a GTK 3.98 tarball. This is another step towards GTK 4. It is a little bit behind schedule, and does not quite include all the things we wanted to get into it, but it gets a lot closer to what we want to ship in GTK 4.

Almost 9 months have passed since the 3.96 snapshot, so there are quite a few new things to look at. Too many to cover them all, but here are some highlights...

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Also: Belated GTK 3.98 Puts GTK 4.0 One Step Closer

Purism and Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME, GTK

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GNOME
  • Community Story: Building a Librem 5 app with Rust and GTK

    Could you introduce yourself and share how you got involved with GNOME development?

    I’m Bilal Elmoussaoui, I co-maintain GNOME Clocks and Sound Recorder and develop GNOME applications. I’m a long-time Linux user. I originally studied civil engineering and I’ve been learning to code for some time now, mostly writing web applications. I started contributing to GNOME projects while honing my Python skills.

    You are now a maintainer of several GNOME apps.

    Yes, I’ve started contributing to applications I use daily like FeedReader and Lollypop. The more I contribute, the more I learn about software development and the ecosystem. After a few years I found myself contributing to several GNOME applications, wherever I could make the user experience better for free software.

    Could you tell us about your recently released Read It Later app?

    Read It Later is a Wallabag client, which is a link saving service that you can host yourself. It includes all the basic features you would expect like managing and viewing articles. It also comes with easy-reader and dark modes in a beautiful and convergent design which adapts perfectly to desktop and mobile screens.

    What technology did you use to create Read It Later?

    I used to write applications with Python/Vala and GTK until late this summer when I got “The Rust programming language” book. It just sat on my desk for a while but I finally decided to pick something small to work on and made a simple Rust and GTK application template. The moment I opened my first GTK window with Rust I was hooked. The Rust GTK bindings have evolved a lot and we now have libhandy Rust bindings for adaptive widgets. Now I always pick Rust as a programming language, Meson as a build system and Flatpak to distribute my applications.

    How did you discover libhandy and are you a mobile Linux enthusiast?

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Welcome 2020

    I’m continuously failing to keep up with the Friends of GNOME donors. I really have to empty this queue as soon as possible.

    I’m really unhappy with the political situation of my country, Brazil. A halfwitted, fascism flirting populist was democratically elected. The public institutions were dominated by their inapt followers. Rich are getting richier, poor are getting poorer, inequality is skyrocketing, and despite all of that, a massive number of citizens seems to be applauding this madness, regardless if they’re profiting or not with this situation. I’m not comfortable with the idea of living here. I’m also not comfortable with the idea of leaving family behind. It seems this trend is spreading all around the world, so where else could I go anyway?

    I’ve also stopped training martial arts. I got involved with Aikido when I was 14. I was a vulnerable, not intellectually emancipated teenager that needed emotional crutches to carry on. For years, Aikido was part of my identity, and I would ignore blatant problems that surrounded it for the sake of keeping the narrative. Feeling like a virtuous warrior was good, after all. Over time, and with the maturity that came with it, the toxicity of it took a toll on me. Quitting it was traumatic. I still feel a big void.

    Quitting martial arts meant I stopped exercising. Turns out, the lack of physical activities, together with an awful political climate, and the stress of being an open source maintainer, is an express highway to depression. When I wrote “On Being a Free Software Maintainer“, I was already going downhill. Things got progressively worse until around GUADEC. Fortunately, the support from the GNOME community, my wife, family, and friends, were strong enough to allow me break this downward spiral.

    I do not know what would have happened without this support. To my family, wife, friends, and the GNOME community: thank you all so much for being here when I most needed.

Debian Reports From Norbert Preining, Paulo Henrique de Lima Santana and Molly de Blanc

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GNOME
Debian
  • Norbert Preining: MuPDF, QPDFView and other Debian updates

    For those interested, I have updated mupdf (1.16.1), pymupdf (1.16.10), and qpdfview (current bzr sources) to the latest versions and added to my local Debian apt repository...

  • Paulo Henrique de Lima Santana: My free software activities in january 2020

    Hello, this is my first monthly report about activities in Debian and Free Software in general.

    Since the end of DebConf19 in July 2020 I was avoiding to work in Debian stuff because the event was too stresseful to me. For months I felt discouraged to contribute to the project, until December.

  • Molly de Blanc: How do you say “desktop environment” in Flemish? FOSDEM 2020 Trip Report

    FOSDEM is one of the biggest community organized conferences in Europe. Run by a team of dedicated volunteers, the conference has been going for 20 years. It’s one of the biggest yearly events for us at GNOME Foundation and a rare opportunity for the staff to come together.

    As a fully remote team, the GNOME Foundation staff all get together twice a year to strategize, plan, and collaborate at GUADEC and at FOSDEM. This is also when the Foundation Board of Directors and Advisory Board have the chance to meet in person.

    In the four days leading up to the event, GTK Core Developer Emanuelle Bassi and Matthias Classen hosted a hackfest focused on GKT and the future of accessibility in GNOME. We really appreciate everyone who showed up, and would especially like to thank the blind participants and those with vision issues and expertise as those using the accessibility tools.

    [...]
    While Executive Director Neil McGovern and Director of Operations Rosanna Yuen met with the Board of Directors, I attended Sustain Summit. I led a session on diversity in open source with a focus on building global movements.

KDE and GNOME: KUnity, Presentations, GitLab and Flatpaks

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KDE
GNOME
  • A year as a KDE developer | The KUnity Setup

    It has been more than a year that I had push rights for all the KDE repositories. So this is an obligatory anniversary post.

    I got introduced to Linux while searching for development environments that came with all sorts of compilers & interpreters by default and I don't have to manually install those stuff. It was 2012 as far as I remember, Ubuntu 12.04 just came out and it was the first solution suggested by the search engines. Though the unavailability of a proper internet connection meant, that I had to wait a couple more years when one of my friends downloaded a copy of Ubuntu 14.04 for me.

  • FOSDEM and Plasma Mobile Sprint 2020

    This was the 20th anniversary for FOSDEM, I first attended 15 years ago, but this year was the first time I actually managed to present a talk there. The subject was, unsurprisingly, KDE Itinerary. You can find the slides and the video recording on the corresponding FOSDEM talk page.

    KDE had a very busy presence at FOSDEM, Plasma Mobile draw a lot of attention, as did efforts for truly free and user-controlled mobile platforms in general. I’m particularly happy seeing the cross-community collaborations going on in that space.

    FOSDEM is a great place to connect and coordinate with other communities, and by now that’s probably one of the main reasons for me to attend. The collaboration with Nextcloud on integrating itinerary extraction into Nextcloud Hub started there last year for example.

    FOSDEM two years ago saw the first successful flight using a KDE Itinerary rendered boarding pass, this year we had the first ever Thalys ride with a ticket presented in KDE Itinerary. We also made a bit of progress with decoding Thalys binary barcodes, more samples would help a lot here though.

  • Presentations Archive

    Some time ago I ran across remark-cmake, a CMake framework for building remark.js-based presentations. Since I’m a sucker for CMake I started using it, even if my presentations are rarely big-and-complicated enough to warrant a build-system.

    Since then I’ve submitted a few pull-requests to remark-cmake, but also given eight (8) presentations using that framework at four (4) different conferences in four countries on two continents. Current scheduling suggests that one more continent and at least four more talks will be added before summer.

  • Clean and linear history with GitLab

    Many GNOME projects still use clean and linear commit history without merge commits even after porting to GitLab. That means that each commit represents one comprehensive feature or bug fix and there are not any side branches. I am not about to discuss the pros and cons of this approach here, you can find many and many posts on this topic on the internet. I would like to explain some common issues for newcomers when using GitLab forks.

    To make some contribution, one has to create a fork of some repository, push desired changes in a new branch and create a merge request to the original project. Please be sure that the “Allows commits from members who can merge to the target branch” checkbox is checked when creating the merge request (or later using the “Edit” button on the top of the page). This is needed to simplify the consequent workflow for the contributor (and maintainers as well). One of the reasons, why this is needed is the fact, that the changes need to be often rebased before they can be merged (to ensure the linear history). Maintainers can’t do this when this feature is not enabled and have to ask contributors to do so. Another reason is that the maintainers can do some changes when the contributor needs help or doesn’t have time to do the changes itself.

  • Robocode and others

    As expressed in a previous post, I prefer to spend my free time with my kids than with technology (for technology I already have my job). However, when there is an exception to that, I do like to do some sort of smaller projects, like “porting” stuff to Flatpak.

    I did my share of Debian and RPM packaging in the past, and honestly I have never enjoyed it (for a number of reasons not really interesting for this post). But “flatpaking” stuff is completely different to me. Maybe it’s my early involvement with it, or maybe it’s my admiration for how its designed, but the feeling when making a Flatpak is of reward, rather than a chore.

MATE 1.24 released

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GNOME

After about a year of development, the MATE Desktop team have finally released MATE 1.24. A big thank you to all contributors who helped to make this happen.

This release contains plenty of new features, bug-fixes, and general improvements. Some of the most important highlights include...

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GNOME 3.36’s New Default Background is Seriously Cool

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GNOME

Have you seen the default background for the upcoming GNOME 3.36 release yet? If not, glance above!

Admittedly the new GNOME 3.36 wallpaper is not exactly a break with tradition: it’s once again predominately blue, and once again features a variety of geometric shapes, fractal lighting, and abstract arrangement.

But the steel blue used in the new Adwaita background has a much colder vibe than the purple and pink hues mixed in with the GNOME 3.34 wallpaper.

GNOME’s Jakub Steiner is the hands behind the latest creation which, as always, is provided in three flavoured variants.

The blue one above is the default wallpaper (the ‘day’ image) and there’s a morning version (very pink) and a (deeply dark) night version too.

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Arc Menu Update Brings Dash to Dock Integration, New Unity Dash Layout

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GNOME

A new version of the Arc Menu GNOME extension has been released and it includes a Unity-inspired new feature.

Arc Menu v41 introduces a revamped “Ubuntu Dash” layout that is clearly inspired by the look of the Unity dash.

While the layout is not a 1:1 clone, and much of the Dash functionality (e.g., scopes) that made Unity special has not been re-implemented here, it’s a interesting alternative to stock “Start Menu” style.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME 3.36 Beta and More

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.36 Beta Released With Many Changes

    Some of the highlights for this GNOME 3.36 beta include:

    - A plethora of GNOME Shell and Mutter improvements made the cut for what will be 3.36. The Mutter and Shell work as usual is leading to a nice evolutionary improvement to the GNOME experience.

  • GNOME 3.36 Is Looking To Be Another Nice Evolutionary Upgrade To The GNOME Desktop

    GNOME 3.36 is due for release in just over one month's time and is shaping up to be another great release building upon all of the polishing and other evolutionary improvements we've seen particularly over the past two or three years.

    The GNOME Shell & Mutter development blog has posted their update concerning progress made in December and January. Besides listing these improvements, there are plenty of screenshots and videos for getting an idea as to the direction of these two key components making up GNOME 3.36.

  • GNOME Shell + Mutter See Big Last Minute Improvements With The GNOME 3.36 Beta

    GNOME Shell and Mutter are out with their v3.35.90 releases today for the planned GNOME 3.36 beta.

    The GNOME 3.35.90 milestone also marks the UI freeze and feature freeze, so it's been a last minute dash getting changes prepared for GNOME 3.36, which is due for release on 11 March.

  • Coding style checks in CI

    For a few weeks now, we’ve had coding style and thinko checks running in CI for GLib, long enough to see that it’s working OK (check out this pipeline!) and is perhaps time to share with others.

    There are two jobs in the checks, both of which run in a new style-check stage of our CI pipeline, which runs before anything else. One job checks the coding style of a merge request, using clang-format. The other job checks for any lines which introduce TODO comments (or similar). These jobs are intended to be fast, but also to not fail the pipeline if they produce warnings. Coding style is subjective, and nobody has yet come up with a mechanical style description which doesn’t have ugly corner cases. So the intention of these jobs is to help remind people of the coding style, to avoid reviewers having to check coding style manually, and hence to only end up thinking about it or discussing it when the CI says the style is wrong.

    The first job, style-check-diff, uses a script to work out the diff from the merge request’s branch point, and then passes that to clang-format-diff.py, a script from LLVM which uses clang-format to reformat only the changed lines in a diff. If any reformatting occurs, that means the merge request differs from the GLib coding style (as described by .clang-format) and should be warned about.

    There are some limitations to clang-format: it can’t completely describe how the GLib coding style aligns function arguments. That’s unfortunate, because GNOME Builder aligns function arguments by default (and it’s nice behaviour). Hopefully somebody will implement support in clang-format for this sometime, so that it can accurately describe the coding style which is used by a large number of GNOME projects.

  • Xamarin forks and whatnots

    Busy days in geewallet world! I just released version 0.4.2.198 which brings some interesting fixes, but I wanted to talk about the internal work that had to be done for each of them, in case you're interested.

  • GtkSourceView Branched

    I’ve branched GtkSourceView for 4.6 (gtksourceview-4-6) which you should be using instead of master for your application’s Nightly Flatpak builds. I will land the GTK 4 port on master early next week. A message to gnome-announce-list has been sent and will hopefully make it into distribution packagers inbox shortly.

  • Read It Later, yet an other GTK & Rust application

    It’s built with Rust, GTK & libhandy on the UI side. It’s fully adaptive which makes it Linux on pocket ready and also comes with a beautiful icon designed by Tobias Bernard.

WinTile For GNOME Shell: Windows 10 Like Quarter Tiling (Snapping) With Super/Win + Arrow Keys Or Mouse

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GNOME

If you like the Microsoft Windows 10 tiling style, you can easily get your GNOME Shell desktop to support it with the help of an extension called WinTile.

The extension brings quarter tiling functionality to GNOME Shell, using the Super/Win + Arrow keys or using the mouse (with previews and snapping when dragging the windows to the edges).

Maximizing single windows and maximizing to the side snap modes also work next to quarter tiling, both using the keyboard (Super/Win + Up to maximize a window, and Super/Win + Left or Right arrow to maximize a window to the left or right, taking 50% of the screen) and mouse. Do note that single window maximizing and maximizing to the left/right (edge tiling) are already present in the standard GNOME Shell, so there's no need to install anything if that's all you want.

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