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GNOME

GtkSourceView on GTK 4

Filed under
Development
GNOME

I spent some time this cycle porting GtkSourceView to GTK 4. It was a good opportunity to help me catch up on how GTK 4’s internals have changed into something modern. It gave me a chance to fix a few pot-holes along the way too.

One of the pot-holes was one I left in GtkTextView years ago. When I plumbed the pixelcache into GTK 3’s TextView I had only cached the primary text content. It seemed fine at the time because the gutters (used for line numbers) is just not that many pixels. So if we have to re-generate that every frame, so be it.

However, in a HiDPI world and 4k monitors on our laps things start to get… warm. So while changing the drawing model in GtkTextView we decided to make the GtkTextView gutters real widgets. Doing so means that GtkSourceGutterRenderer will be real GtkWidget‘s going forward and can do all sorts of neat stuff widgets can do.

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GNOME 3.34.3 Release

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GNOME


GNOME 3.34.3 is now available. This is a stable release containing
seven weeks worth of bugfixes since the 3.34.2 release. Since it only
contains bugfixes, all distributions shipping 3.34.2 should upgrade.
Note the GNOME flatpak runtime has been updated as well

There will be releases through out this cycle and most likely the next
one as well.

Next stable release is scheduled for the middle of February, see
https://wiki.gnome.org/ThreePointThirtyfive

If you want to compile GNOME 3.34.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot:

 https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.34.3/gnome-3.34.3.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

 https://download.gnome.org/core/3.34/3.34.3/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

 https://download.gnome.org/core/3.34/3.34.3/sources/

Enjoy the new release,

Javier Jardon
GNOME Release Team

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Also: GNOME 3.34.3 Released To Offer Up More Fixes Ahead Of GNOME 3.36

Manjaro 19.0 Preview Images For KDE + GNOME Available For Testing

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Manjaro 19.0 Preview Images For KDE + GNOME Available For Testing

    For fans of the easy-to-use Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, 19.0 preview images as the first test builds have begun to surface.

    These first preview builds of Manjaro 19.0 are based on the Linux 5.4 kernel, introduce NVIDIA PRIME support paired with their latest proprietary driver, theme updates, Oracle VM VirtualBox support fixes, and many other package updates for this Arch Linux based platform.

  • 1st preview of Manjaro Gnome is ready

    Here comes the first testbuild for the upcoming Manjaro-Gnome 19.0 edition. This is a full build on the testing branch.

    Highlights are:

    needed fixes for VirtualBox support
    linux 5.4 kernel series
    Nvidia 440 driver series with Prime-Support
    Layout Switcher to have Manjaro, Gnome, Classic and Modern
    Latest theme and many more
    Please give it a try and let us hear your feedback! 

GNOME Shell 3.35.3 Released is Out But Also Mono Stuff

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell 3.35.3 Released With NVIDIA Driver Offloading, Fixes To Shell + Mutter

    GNOME Shell 3.35.3 and Mutter 3.35.3 were released today as part of the next development step on the path towards GNOME 3.36 coming out in March.

    Notable with the GNOME Shell 3.35.3 release is the NVIDIA multi-GPU handling support for its switcheroo control to allow launching applications on the secondary GPU / offloaded. This switcheroo control has worked out elegantly for the open-source GPU drivers and now the proper environment variables are passed for dealing with the NVIDIA proprietary driver.

  • Introducing geewallet [Ed: Microsoft Mono makes a comeback in Planet GNOME today]

    Version 0.4.2.187 of geewallet has just been published to the snap store! You can install it by looking for its name in the store or by installing it from the command line with `snap install geewallet`. It features a very simplistic and minimalistic UI/UX. Nothing very fancy, especially because it has a single codebase that targets many (potential) platforms, e.g. you can also find it in the Android App Store.

    What was my motivation to create geewallet in the first place, around 2 years ago? Well, I was very excited about the “global computing platform” that Ethereum was promising. At the time, I thought it would be like the best replacement of Namecoin: decentralised naming system, but not just focusing on this aspect, but just bringing Turing-completeness so that you can build whatever you want on top of it, not just a key-value store. So then, I got ahold of some ethers to play with the platform. But by then, I didn’t find any wallet that I liked, especially when considering security. Most people were copy+pasting their private keys into a website (!) called MyEtherWallet. Not only this idea was terrifying (since you had to trust not just the security skills of the sysadmin who was in charge of the domain&server, but also that the developers of the software don’t turn rogue…), it was even worse than that, it was worse than using a normal hot wallet. And what I wanted was actually a cold wallet, a wallet that could run in an offline device, to make sure hacking it would be impossible (not faraday-cage-impossible, but reasonably impossible).

    So there I did it, I created my own wallet.

GNOME has a ‘Secret’ Screen Recorder. Here’s How to Use it!

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

GNOME is one of the most popular desktop environments and for good reasons. It has a modern UI and it comes with a number of GNOME-specific applications that blend well with the overall desktop appearance.

You can tweak GNOME to your liking as much as you want but I am not here to discuss that. GNOME desktop has some hidden features that you probably are not aware of.

One of such not-so-obvious feature is a built in screen recorder.

Yes, you read that right. If you are using GNOME desktop, you don’t necessarily need to install other screen recorders in Linux. You just need to know the correct keyboard shortcut.

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GNOME has a ‘Secret’ Screen Recorder. Here’s How to Use it!

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME provides a built-in screen recorder that you can use to quickly record your desktop session. Here’s how to use it.
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Introducing Bonsai

Filed under
GNOME

What I’ve built to experiment with this all is Bonsai. It is very much an experiment at this phase but it is getting interesting enough to collaborate with others who would like to join me.

Bonsai consists of a daemon that you run on your “mostly connected” computer. Although that could easily be a raspberry pi quality computer in your home. That computer hosts the “upstream” storage space for files and application content.

Other devices like laptops, phones, or IoT can be paired with that primary device. They communicate using TLS connections using pinned self-signed certificates with point-to-point D-Bus serialization on top. The D-Bus serialization makes it convenient to use gdbus-codegen to generate proxies and services.

One service available to devices is the storage service. It can be consumed from libbonsai-storage to allow applications to browse, create, move, modify and stream file content.

Applications are much better when they can communicate between devices. So a Data-Access-Object library, aptly named libbonsai-dao, provides serializable object storage built upon GVariant and LMDB. It supports primary and secondary indexes, queries, cursors, transactions, and incremental sync between devices. It has the ability to rebase local changes atop changes pulled from the primary Bonsai device.

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Also: Bonsai Is A New Effort For GNOME-Focused Multi-Device Cloud/Synchronization

Designing an Icon for Your App

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
GNOME

You’ve designed your app’s interface, and found the perfect name for it. But of course a great app also needs a great icon before you can release it to the world.

After the name, the app icon is the most important part of an app’s brand. The icon can help explain at a glance what the app does, and serves as an entry point to the rest of the experience. A high quality icon can make people want to use an app more, because it’s a stand-in for the quality of the entire app.

Think of the app icon like an album cover for your app. Yes, technically the music is the same even if you have a terrible cover, but a great cover can capture the spirit of the album and elevate the quality of the thing as a whole.

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Also: Fwupd 1.3.6 Firmware Updater Released With Initial Windows Support

KDE and GNOME: Cantor 19.12, GNOME Maps and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Cantor 19.12

    Recently, the KDE community announced the release 19.12 of KDE applications, inlcuding Cantor. Many highlights of this release are mentioned in the release announcement. Today we’d like to highlight the development done in Cantor for the 19.12 release

    In the previos release 19.08 we mostly concentrated on improving the usability of Cantor and spent quite some effort to stabilize the already available feature set. This release comes with a big new feature, namely the support for Jupyter notebook format.

    Jupyter is a a very popular open-source web-based application that provides an interactive environment for different programming languages. The interactive documents are organized in “notebooks”. This application is widely used in different scientific and educational areas and there is a lot of shared notebooks publically available on the internet. As an example for a collection of such notebooks see this collection.

    For Cantor, which is very similar in spirit to Jupyter, we decided to add the ability to read and save Jupyter’s notebook format in order to benefit from the big amount of available content for Jupyter. The implementation required for this was mainly done by Nikita Sirgienko as part of the Google Summer of Code 2019 project. His series of blog posts contains many examples as well as implementational details that will be omitted here.

  • Marcus Lundblad: Christmas Maps

    To stick to the tradition I thought that I should write a little post about what's been going on since the stable 3.34 release in September. The main thing that's come since then for the upcoming 3.36 release is support for getting public transit route/itinerary planning using third-party providers. The basic support for public transit routing, based on OpenTripPlanner has been in place since 2017 with the original plan to find funding/hosting to set up a GNOME-specific instance of OTP fed with a curated set of GTFS feed. But since this plan didn't come to fruition, I repurposed the existing support so that it can fetch a list of known providers with defined geographical regions. First by utilising the existing OpenTripPlanner implementation (but rewritten to be instanciated per third-party provider). Later I have added plugins for the Swedish Resrobot and Swiss opendata.ch online API. These have yet not been activated in the service file (it's using the same service file as for tile and search providers). But this will soon be there, so stay tuned.

  • End of the year Update: 2019 edition

    It’s the end of December and it seems that yet another year has gone by, so I figured that I’d write an EOY update to summarize my main work at Igalia as part of our Chromium team, as my humble attempt to make up for the lack of posts in this blog during this year.

    I did quit a few things this year, but for the purpose of this blog post I’ll focus on what I consider the most relevant ones: work on the Servicification and the Blink Onion Soup projects, the migration to the new Mojo APIs and the BrowserInterfaceBroker, as well as a summary of the conferences I attended, both as a regular attendee and a speaker.

Linux App Summit(LAS’ 19) | Barcelona

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME

Recently, I visited Barcelona to attend The Linux App Summit as a part of the organizing team. It was designed to accelerate the growth of the Linux application ecosystem by bringing together everyone involved in creating a great Linux application user experience.

I was very excited about the conference and my first visit to Europe. I was part of the Marketing and the PR team for the conference. The conference was scheduled from 12th to 15th Nov. I landed in Barcelona on 11th early morning and headed towards my room where I was going to stay for the next 5 days.

The conference was organized at La Lleialtat Santsenca, a chic community center located in the Sants neighborhood. Luckily, I got a place to stay at around 100 meters from the conference location. I always prefer hostels near the conference location as they save a lot of traveling time and gives time to explore more.

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Android Leftovers

Linux 5.6.2

I'm announcing the release of the 5.6.2 kernel.

All users of the 5.6 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.6.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.6.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git;a=summary

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.6.2 Released With Fix For The IWLWIFI Intel WiFi Driver

DownZemAll is an open source download manager for Windows, Linux and macOS

Recently, while casually browsing GitHub, I came across a name that seemed familiar at first; it turned out to be a new download manager called DownZemAll. The program's name is very similar to the popular DownloadThemAll! extension for Firefox, which is what surprised me. The official page reveals that the developer of DownZemAll started the project during the time the legacy add-on stopped working with Firefox Quantum, and seems to have used it as the inspiration to rewrite this application. But that's where the similarities end, because DownZemAll is a desktop program. Let's take a look at it to see how it stacks up. The interface is mostly what you'd expect in a download manager: a menu bar, toolbar, the main pane, but unlike others, DownZemAll has a sidebar too. The options in the side panel are also available from the right-click menu. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Choose Linux, The Linux Link Tech Show, Bad Voltage