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GNOME

Oracle Linux and GNOME

Filed under
GNOME
Security
  • Oracle Linux Security Developer To AMD: "Smatch" Your Driver

    Dan Carpenter of Oracle who is responsible for security audits of the Linux kernel is not happy with the current state of the AMDGPU DRM code-base.

    Carpenter fired off an email today on the public kernel mailing list with the title: AMD, please run Smatch on your driver. The Smatch he is referring to is a static analysis tool he designed for working on the Linux kernel.

  • Longtime GNOME Contributor & Oracle Principal UX Designer Leaves The Company

    The latest talent to have departed Oracle is a longtime GNOME contributor who has at Oracle/Sun Microsystems for nearly the past two decades.

    Calum Benson who had been involved with GNOME since 2000 and was particularly active during the Sun Microsystems days with GNOME 1.x and GNOME 2.x, involved in improving the usability of GNOME, has announced his sunset at Oracle.

GNOME: GNOME.Asia 2017, Peru, and fwupd

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME.Asia 2017

    GNOME.Asia 2017 was held in ChongQing, China. It is my first time to ChongQing, and I like it very much in many aspects. The city is built around mountains, so the there are lots of roads that are not straight, which is completely different with the roads in Beijing. There are lots of ups and downs, too. That’s why you can barely see someone riding a bike there. It can be dangerous and tiring, too. Besides, there are lots of overpasses, which makes the city more 3D. The city is also built along the Yangzi River, so you can see many bridges(like London, I think). Here are some photos of the city:

  • Proposal of the program “Peru Rumbo al GSoC 2018”

    Now, the idea is to select 12 Peruvian students students to offer a special technical training during six Sundays during November and December 2017 to apply to the next round of the GSoC through the GNOME and the Fedora project, thanks to the support of the Linux Foundation.

  • Quirks in fwupd as key files

    A few minutes ago I merged a PR that moves the database of supported and quirked devices out of the C code and into runtime loaded files. When fwupd is installed in long-term support distros it’s very hard to backport new versions as new hardware is released. The idea with this functionalty is that the end user can drop an additional (or replace an existing) file in a .d directory with a simple format and the hardware will magically start working. This assumes no new quirks are required, as this would obviously need code changes, but allows us to get most existing devices working in an easy way without the user compiling anything.

GNOME: New Release, GNOME Bug Squash Month, GNOME.Asia Summit 2017

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26.2 Released as Last Scheduled Maintenance Update for the Linux Desktop

    GNOME's Michael Catanzaro is announcing today the availability of the second and last scheduled maintenance update for the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment carrying numerous bug fixes.

    GNOME 3.26.2 is out just in time, as initially scheduled, and it's here three weeks after the first point release to improve the stability, security, and reliability of your GNOME 3.26 desktop environment. It will be coming soon to the stable repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distro, so make sure you update as soon as possible.

  • GNOME Bug squash month
  • GNOME.Asia summit 2017

    GNOME.Asia summit 2017 was held in Chongqing city of China. The venue was the Chongqing University approximately 90 years old with the vast beautiful Eco-friendly campus. I was invited as one of the speakers. The topic of my speech was “Why FOSS in education make sense?”. The message of my talk was to incorporate the open source in the education system. I believe that faculty members in the computer science department in various Universities around the world should be made aware and practice open source software and also if possible contribute to open source project. This way they can guide their students in the best possible way. They can act as the medium between the student and the open source project mentors as the teachers knows their students well. They can direct their students according to their capabilities and interests.

GNOME Project Welcomes Canonical and Ubuntu to GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

With the release of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, Canonical replaced their Unity user interface with the GNOME desktop environment, and now they're looking to sponsor the project by becoming a member of the Advisory Board.

Among some powerful members of GNOME Foundation's Advisory Board, we can mention Google, FSF (Free Software Foundation), and Linux Foundation. And now, Canonical will also support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Linux-maker Canonical joins GNOME Foundation advisory board

GNOME 3.26.2 released

Filed under
GNOME

I'm pleased to announce the release of GNOME 3.26.2, the final planned release for the GNOME 3.26 series. It includes many bugfixes, documentation improvements, and translation updates. All distributions shipping GNOME 3.26 are strongly encouraged to upgrade.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.26.2 Released

Ubuntu 17.10 - on the GNOME again

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

Ubuntu is one of the world's most popular Linux distributions. The distribution is available in several flavours, the two most widely recognized being the Desktop and Server editions. The release of Ubuntu 17.10 introduces a number of important changes, the most visible ones mostly affecting the Desktop edition which I will focus on in this review. As 17.10 is an interim release rather than a long term support release, it will received security updates for just nine months.

One technical change in version 17.10 is the phasing out of 32-bit builds of the Desktop edition, though the Server edition is still available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture. Another significant change is the Ubuntu distribution has swapped out its in-house Unity desktop and replaced it with a customized version of the GNOME Shell desktop. Unity is still available in Ubuntu's software repositories if we wish to install it later.

I opted to download the Desktop edition of Ubuntu 17.10. The ISO for this edition is 1.4GB in size and booting from this media brings up a graphical window where we are asked if we would like to try Ubuntu's live desktop mode or launch the system installer. This screen also lets us select the system's language with the default being English.

Read more

Lightweight Linux Distributions, KDE Server Decoration, GNOME GitLab initiative

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • 10 Best Lightweight Linux Distributions For Older Computers In 2017

    What do you do with your old computers? The one which once had good hardware configuration but now those are considered outdated. Why not revive your old computer with Linux? I am going to list best lightweight Linux distributions that you can use on your older PC.

    While our focus is on older computers, you can also use most of these lightweight Linux on relatively new hardware. This will give you a better performance if you use your computer for resource-heavy usage such as video editing on Linux.

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  • KDE Server Decoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland-Protocols

    Yesterday the GTK tool-kit added support for KDE's server-side decorations on Wayland to be used when client-side decorations are not active. Now it's been proposed adding the KDE Server Decoration Protocol to the upstream Wayland-Protocols repository.

  • GitLab initiative – Short summary

    Georges told me some people outside of our community asked about our GitLab initiative and that there is some confusion what the status is and that contrary to my belief, there is actual interest outside of GNOME. Since I guess people outside of our community didn’t follow our regular conversations, discussions and update reports in our GNOME mailing list for general desktop discussion,  I’ll do a short summarize.

    Almost a year ago we started looking into alternatives to Bugzilla and cgit, and it became a long research, discussion and meeting with several parties and a few of us, Alberto, Allan and me, which then expanded to more people in order to give a different point of vision, like Emmanuele, Daniel, etc. All the research, work and reasoning we did and our eventual decision for a recommendation is written in our wiki page.

GNOME: Ubuntu, Jabra, GTK

Filed under
GNOME
  • Latest and greatest versions of GNOME apps on YOUR desktop!

    Want to run the latest GNOME applications on Ubuntu 14.04, 16.04 and 17.10? Actually, not just Ubuntu, many other distributions such as Fedora, Linux Mint and Debian that support snap.

    We have now packaged a pretty extensive list of the latest GNOME apps as snaps and provided them in the Snap store. Any of these snaps will work just fine on any distribution that supports snaps.

  • Jabra joins the LVFS

    You can now update the firmware just by clicking on a button in GNOME Software when using fwupd >= 1.0.0. Working with Jabra to add the required DFU quirks to fwupd and to get legal clearance to upload the firmware has been a pleasure. Their hardware is well designed and works really well in Linux (with the latest firmware), and they’ve been really helpful providing all the specifications we needed to get the firmware upgrade working reliably. We’ll hopefully be adding some different Jabra devices in the coming months to the LVFS too.

  • GTK talk at UNAC

    Today I did a talk regarded to GTK on Fedora and GNOME. Thanks to the group Codefiis for organizing the workshop at the Faculty of Industrial and Systems Engineering UNAC.

KDE and GNOME: Qt 5.10 Beta 2, Falkon, KDE Promo, GCompris, GNOME Foundation, Retro-GTK

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Qt 5.10 Reaches Its Second Beta Milestone

    Qt 5.10 is up to its second beta milestone ahead of its expected stable debut by the end of November.

    The Qt 5.10 Beta 2 milestone is coming out on time, giving hope that Qt 5.10.0 will be officially released as scheduled on 30 November rather than being delayed as has become common for Qt5 releases.

  • Qt 5.10 Beta2 available

    Qt 5.10 beta2 is now available. Instructions how to get the release are here: https://wiki.qt.io/How_to_get_snapshot_via_online_installer.

    Please take a tour and and test the release. And please make sure all issues which must be fixed before final Qt 5.10.0 release are visible in rc blocker list (https://bugreports.qt.io/issues/?filter=18957#)

    Diff to first beta can be found as an attachment.

  • Falkon – New browser under the KDE Umbrella

    It is worth noting that the package is a “git snapshot” and is mid re-branding (it still refers to QupZilla in many places), there are many bugs/issues and the software is no-where near release quality.

  • KDE Promo Activity Report – September 28, 2017

    This is just a quick round-up to keep you in the loop and point you to KDE Promo activities that you can join.

    If you missed the previous report, or just want to refresh your memory, you can read it here.

  • GCompris Qt for Raspberry Pi

     

    This version for Raspberry Pi was made possible thanks to the new “light” mode that we’ve been working on (read the previous post to learn more about this new rendering mode).

    It was built and tested on Raspberry Pi 3, where it works good. Since it was not tested a lot yet, this first package is considered beta. Please report any issue you may experience with it. If you can try it on a Pi 2, please let us know the result. It was also not tested on Pi 1, but those probably don’t have enough cpu and/or ram to run it.

  • Empowering individuals of the community – The board takes action

    This blog post is intended for GNOME Foundation members or people interested in part of our budget management. I have good news for you, the board has decided new policies to empower the individuals of our community!

  • Retro-GTK Has An Exciting Future Ahead With Many Improvements For Libretro Gaming

    GNOME developer Adrien Plazas has written a blog post about some of the big work items he's engaged in for retro-gtk, the GNOME user-interface for running various libretro cores / game emulators.

  • 10 Best Icon Themes For Linux

    One of the coolest things you can do to your Linux desktop is tweaking it to suit you. One key part of the tweaking process is to change your icon theme and you probably are going to want to do this as some distros ship some displeasing icon themes. Fortunately, the Linux community provides a ton of themes that you can use to turn your Linux desktop around and looking good. Let’ take a look at some ten awesome available for your desktop.

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GTK+ 3.92

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GTK4's Vulkan Renderer Is Close To Complete

    Red Hat's Matthias Clasen has written a blog post concerning the changes found in the big GTK+ 3.92 development release that is pushing towards the GTK4 tool-kit release.

  • GTK+ 3.92

    Yesterday, we released GTK+ 3.92.1, 重庆市. Since it has been a while since the last 3.91 release, here is a brief look at the major changes.

    This release is another milestone on our way towards GTK+ 4. And while a lot still needs to be done, this release allows a first glimpse at some of the things we hope to achieve in GTK+ 4.

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