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GNOME

GNOME and KDE: System Settings Progress, Akademy Results, and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • System Settings Progress

    I would like to provide some information on working with System Settings. This is a big endeavor and not an easy one. System Settings is a good expression of the power of KDE and also the many influences that have shaped it over the years.

    Trying to untangle the work that has gone into System Settings requires time and patience. I have always been interested in working in revamping this UI. We worked with the team in the VDG on this some time ago, and altough there were many great and interesting changes, the scope of the work was too great. Therefore, we decided only to move forward with those things that were achievable at the time.

  • Akademy Results

    At the beginning of the summer I went to Akademy in Almeria. So what did it bring, in terms of development? I can point to the FreeBSD-on-KDE-Slimbook posts as one technical result of Akademy, although I suppose I could have just had the machine shipped to me, too. (There need to be more posts about the laptop, as FreeBSD support for it improves; I must admit I’ve been a little lax in hacking on that).

  • Move status icons to your GNOME top bar

    However, there are also free and open source apps with the same issues. These apps haven’t been updated to use newer features when installed in a GNOME environment like Fedora Workstation.

  • GTK, Python, WebKit and Latex Workshops on Fedora 26

    This afternoon, we did two workshops at PUCP, one to present and code in GTK and the other to work with Latex, each one lasted an hour. Thanks to the organizers of INFOSOFT 2017 for the opportunity to share free Software tools to people. This event was free to everyone and we did a volunteer job as a group to promote Fedora and the GNOMe project in our local community.

  • Paying for FOSS apps

    There’s been an ongoing topic in the GNOME community about how developers can get some money for their apps. From a fixed price to pay-what-you-want or donations, getting people to pay for software as end users is not easy. This is true even if you’re selling software through a mainstream platform like Google Play or the Apple Appstore, let alone if you’re a Free Software developer and you are relying on donations from your users.

    Even if you’re willing to donate a couple of euros for supporting an app you’re about to install, you’ll have to go through the trouble of finding out how to make the donation. This may involve: 1) going to the app developer’s website; 2) finding out whether they accept donations; 3) hope they receive donations through a service you already use (PayPal, bank transfer, Bitcoin, etc.) and perform the donation.
    During GUADEC, Richard Hughes organized a discussion around the problems of getting donations through GNOME Software. And now the GNOME app center has a “donate” button for apps that declare a donation link.

GNOME: LAS GNOME, GNOME-Shell, and GUADEC

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GNOME
  • #LASGNOME

    This is a long overdue blog post, that should’ve, ideally, been written a week ago, while it was most fresh in my mind. From my own observations of everything that went on during the conference, together with the good feedbacks and reviews we received from the participants, I dare say the first Libre Application Summit, hosted by GNOME (“LAS GNOME”) transpired successfully. So I admit, after a week of keeping myself on my toes, I arrived home, and basked in the afterglow of the success of the very first edition of LAS GNOME.

  • Fedora26, jhbuild and gnome-shell

    Ok, so in my previous previous post I wrote about not being able to restore my build in time. Given the fact that reinstalling the OS would take more time, I took a shot at rebuilding gnome-shell (with the beloved jhbuild, of course) inside a virtual machine, on a Fedora26 OS.

    This was the first step towards fixing my issue. As you will see, this post aims at helping newcomers install gnome-shell on their machines by describing all the issues that I encountered while building.

    First thing you want to do is read the jhbuild guide that can be found here and then install jhbuild.

  • My first GUADEC experience

    One long plane ride and two trains later, I finally arrived in Karlsruhe, three evenings earlier than Day 1 of GUADEC since Cosimo was participating in the Board and AdBoard meetings. As we checked-in at the Achat Plaza Hotel, the first familiar face we saw was Jeff. I had been working on the Foundation’s FY 2015 Annual Report closely with Jeff, Zana and Nuritzi for the past few months and I was excited to get my hands on a printed copy of the report; Jeff actually checked in a ~20kg luggage filled with the reports!

GNOME/GTK: WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92, GTK Python, GNOME 'Manchester' Coming Soon

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GNOME
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.17.92 Brings Improved Wayland Support

    The WebKitGTK+ build of the WebKit rendering engine for GNOME desktop applications has seen measurable Wayland improvements ahead of this month's GNOME 3.28 debut.

  • Working with Buttons and Labels with GTK Python

    We have another meeting with the GNOME + Fedora local group in Lima, Peru to prepare ourselves in coding to offer better workshops and conferences.

  • A Late GUADEC 2017 Post

    It’s been a little over a month since I got back from Manchester, and this post should’ve come out earlier but I’ve been swamped.

    The conference was absolutely lovely, the organisation were a 110% on point (serious kudos, I know first hand how hard that is). Others on Planet GNOME have written extensively about the talks, the social events, and everything in between that made it a great experience. What I would like to write about is about why this year’s GUADEC was special to me.

Here's What Ubuntu 17.10's Default GNOME Shell Theme and Login Screen Look Like

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Soon after it entered Feature Freeze development stage on August 24, 2017, the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is yet to receive a polished and final default desktop session which resembles that of previous releases running Unity.

Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 9

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

A very visual update today on our new Artful default session! This one is, as promised about our new GNOME Shell theme and you can see below some examples of those changes. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

Events: GNOME 3.26 "Manchester", GUADEC 2017, Randa Roundup, and SRECon17 Europe

Filed under
KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Waiting for GNOME 3.26 Stable Release!

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" planned to be released at 13 September 2017. Reading the FeaturePlans and Schedule from its wiki makes me want to run it sooner! I hope Ubuntu will successfully include 3.26 on Artful Aardvark release so I can make a review for it later. However, this short article mentions some of its new feature, new apps, some links from GUADEC 2017's participants, and further GNOME links. Enjoy!

  • GNOME GUADEC 2017: Presentations, Videos, & Links

    GUADEC 2017, the latest GNOME Project annual conference, has been held at 28 July-2 August 2017 in Manchester, United Kingdom. I collect as many resources as possible here including presentations & videos (so you can download them), poster & template, write-ups by attendees, and of course the links about GUADEC 2017. So, if you didn't attend GUADEC 2017, you still can find the resources here! Enjoy!

  • Randa Roundup - Part I

    Our intrepid developers are getting ready to make their way to Randa, and we are gradually finding out what they will be doing up there in the Swiss mountains.

    As Valorie said in a recent blog post, accessibility is useful for everybody at some point or another. Clear, highly contrasted icons, easy to reach keyboard shortcuts, and scalable fonts are things we can all appreciate most of the time, whether we have any sort of physical disability or not.

    With that in mind, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle will be working on Kdenlive, KDE's video editing software. He'll be reviewing the user interface; that is, the different panels, toolbars, etc., to make it easier to use for people who start editing for the first time. He'll also be working on packaging - creating AppImages and Flatpaks - so the latest versions of Kdenlive can be installed anywhere without having to worry about dependencies.

  • Takeaways from SRECon17 Europe

    As every last three years in a row, I attended SRECon in Europe. I can literally say this year was totally broken comparing with former conferences. I think it’s because I had much higher expectations from this conference. The first shot in 2014 was more than awesome, but year to year it’s getting worse. Almost all talks from Google were like a summary of every chapter in SRE book. We just skipped all the rest of the talks sourced by Google.

Status Icons and GNOME

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GNOME

“Status icons” go by a few different names. A lot of people know them by the area where they appear, which gets described as the “system tray” or “notification area”. Whatever you call it, it’s the place where a string of little icons often gets shown, typically by applications that are running in the background.

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GNOME: GNOME Tweaks, GNOME Pie, GNOME Shell Search

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GNOME
  • Gnome Pie – A Circular Application Launcher (Menu) for Linux

    You know about Dash to Dock and Dash to Panel. But do you know about Gnome Pie? It’s a completely different concept from the app launchers typical of Windows, Mac, and Linux systems because it implements an idea known as “Fitts’ law”.

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.25.91

    The GNOME 3.26 release cycle is in its final bugfix stage before release.

    Here’s a look at what’s new in GNOME Tweaks since my last post.

    I’ve heard people say that GNOME likes to remove stuff. If that were true, how would there be anything left in GNOME? But maybe it’s partially true. And maybe it’s possible for removals to be a good thing?

  • These Pictures Show How GNOME Shell Search Is Improving

    GNOME 3.26 improves the appearance of GNOME Shell search results, making better use of screen space to show more results on screen.

GNOME: 3.26 Release Video, GSoC, GNOME on Wayland

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GNOME
  • 3.26 Release Video in the Works

    3.26 is sneaking up on everyone and last week I started working on the release video which process you can follow on the wiki, I will keep it updated as I move on. I plan to be doing major work in the green screening, animation areas and video editing myself but others are contributing with soundtrack, writing the manuscript and recording videos.

  • Wrapping up GSoC 2017

    So, GSoC ends in a short while and I want to take advantage of that and show a preview of both features that we’ve worked on Smile.

    As I have described here and here, I worked on the gnome-shell search results and made them look different and then I added system actions to the mix. Without further ado, let’s see how they turned out.

    First up, the updated gnome-shell results. The idea was that we needed to fit as many results as possible on the screen, making it possible for lower resolutions to handle fitting those results on the screen. At the same time, we had to make sure that the screen won’t be cluttered, or it would’ve turned into a mess.

  • How Glib-rs works, part 2: Transferring lists and arrays

    In the first part, we saw how glib-rs provides the FromGlib and ToGlib traits to let Rust code convert from/to Glib's simple types, like to convert from a Glib gboolean to a Rust bool and vice-versa. We also saw the special needs of strings; since they are passed by reference and are not copied as simple values, we can use FromGlibPtrNone and FromGlibPtrFull depending on what kind of ownership transfer we want, none for "just make it look like we are using a borrowed reference", or full for "I'll take over the data and free it when I'm done". Going the other way around, we can use ToGlibPtr and its methods to pass things from Rust to Glib.

  • GSoC 2017 : wrap-up and code submission

    This post pretends to summarize what has been done during my project in the Google Summer of Code. This is also my Work Product Submission. The project has consisted on implementing a plugin manager for Pitivi and adding a plugin called the Developer Console.

  • GtkBuilder, Vala and WebKit

    To use a WebKitWebView inside a GTK+ template, one needs to workaround the fact that WebKitWebView breaks the heuristics in GtkBuilder to guess the GType from the human readable type name. That’s easy. Anybody who has used GObject is likely to have encountered some dialect of g_type_ensure, or, as the more learned will point out, GtkBuilder has a type-func attribute for cases like these.

  • Remote desktop capabilities set to make a comeback in GNOME on Wayland

    Remote desktop under Wayland seems to finally be happening; thanks to work on new APIs and a new GNOME Remote Desktop service undertaken by Jonas Ådahl!

    GNOME’s Vino remote desktop server was left behind when GNOME transitioned their desktop from the X compositor to Wayland. This meant that people who use distributions that stay close to upstream, like Fedora 25, have been left without a working VNC or even an RDP server for almost a full year.

GNOME, GUADEC, GSoC, and GTK/GIMP

Filed under
GNU
GNOME
  • GNOME 20th Birthday Party in Lima, Peru

    This year I was pleased to receive the invitation for the 20th Birthday Party celebrated at the Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry during GUADEC 2017 in Manchester, UK .

  • GUADEC 2017 Manchester

    Really enjoyed this year’s GUADEC. Thanks everyone for coming and the local team for pulling off a perfectly organized conference.

  • GSoC Final Report

    Google Summer of Code 2017 has come to an end, I worked on adding Gamepad and Keyboard Configuration to GNOME Games. This post is a part of my final submission.

  • GSoC '17 - Final Report

    This summer as part of Google Summer of Code 2017, I worked on the project “Pitivi: Color correction interface using three chromatic wheels”. As GSoC concludes, I’m writing this post as part of my final submission.

  • GSoC – Final report

    The Google Summer of Code is almost over and I want to give you a quick update on what has been done in the last months.

    You can have a look on how the integration of the Nextcloud client looks like in Nautilus in the following video. As GNOME will drop the support for status icons on the near future this will be the way for sync clients to give the user a way to access their functionally in the context of the synced folder.

  • GIMP 2.9.6 now in Gentoo
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More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distro to Get a New Look with Debonaire Desktop Theme

Q4OS is a small GNU/Linux distribution based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE). It's explicitly designed to make the Microsoft Windows to Linux transition accessible and more straightforward as possible for anyone. Dubbed Debonaire, the new desktop theme uses dark-ish elements for the window titlebar and panel. Somehow it resembles the look and feels of the acclaimed Arc GTK+ theme, and it makes the Q4OS operating system more modern than the standard look offered by the Trinity Desktop Environment. Read more

today's leftovers

Software: GIMP, VLC, Cryptsetup, Caprine, KWin and NetworkManager

  • GIMP 2.9.8 Open-Source Image Editor Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing
    GIMP 2.9.8, a development version towards the major GIMP 2.10 release, was announced by developer Alexandre Prokoudine for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released
    Newly released GIMP 2.9.8 introduces on-canvas gradient editing and various enhancements while focusing on bugfixing and stability. For a complete list of changes please see NEWS.
  • It Looks Like VLC 3.0 Will Finally Be Released Soon
    VLC 3.0 is something we've been looking forward to for years and it's looking like that big multimedia player update could be released very soon. Thanks to Phoronix reader Fran for pointing out that VLC 3.0 release candidates have begun to not much attention. VLC 3.0 RC1 was tagged at the end of November and then on Tuesday marked VLC 3.0 RC2 being tagged, but without any official release announcements.
  • cryptsetup 2.0.0
  • Cryptsetup 2.0 Released With LUKS2 Format Support
    A new major release is available of Cryptsetup, the user-space utility for dealing with the DMCrypt kernel module for setting up encrypted disk volumes. Cryptsetup 2.0.0 is notable in that it introduces support for the new on-disk LUKS2 format but still retaining support for LUKS(1). The LUKS2 format is security hardened to a greater extent, more extensible than LUKS, supports in-place upgrading from LUKS, and other changes.
  • Caprine – An Unofficial Elegant Facebook Messenger Desktop App
    There is no doubt Facebook is one of the most popular and dynamic social network platform in the modern Internet era. It has revolutionized technology, social networking, and the future of how we live and interact. With Facebook, We can connect, communicate with one another, instantly share our memories, photos, files and even money to anyone, anywhere in the world. Even though Facebook has its own official messenger, some tech enthusiasts and developers are developing alternative and feature-rich apps to communicate with your buddies. The one we are going to discuss today is Caprine. It is a free, elegant, open source, and unofficial Facebook messenger desktop app built with Electron framework.
  • KWin On Wayland Without X11 Support Can Startup So Fast It Causes Problems
    It turns out that if firing up KDE's KWin Wayland compositor without XWayland support, it can start up so fast that it causes problems. Without XWayland for providing legacy X11 support to KDE Wayland clients, the KWin compositor fires up so fast that it can cause a crash in their Wayland integration as KWin's internal connection isn't even established... Yep, Wayland compositors are much leaner and cleaner than the aging X Server code-base that dates back 30+ years, granted most of the XWayland code is much newer than that.
  • NetworkManager Picks Up Support For Intel's IWD WiFi Daemon & Meson Build System
    NetworkManager now has support for Intel's lean "IWD" WiFi daemon. IWD is a lightweight daemon for managing WiFi devices via a D-Bus interface and has been in development since 2013 (but was only made public in 2016) and just depends upon GCC / Glibc / ELL (Embedded Linux Library).

Linux Foundation: Servers, Kubernetes and OpenContrail

  • Many cloud-native hands try to make light work of Kubernetes
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation, home of the Kubernetes open-source community, grew wildly this year. It welcomed membership from industry giants like Amazon Web Services Inc. and broke attendance records at last week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon conference in Austin, Texas. This is all happy news for Kubernetes — the favored platform for orchestrating containers (a virtualized method for running distributed applications). The technology needs all the untangling, simplifying fingers it can get. This is also why most in the community are happy to tamp down their competitive instincts to chip away at common difficulties. “You kind of have to,” said Michelle Noorali (pictured), senior software engineer at Microsoft and co-chair of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America & Europe 2017. “These problems are really hard.”
  • Leveraging NFV and SDN for network slicing
    Network slicing is poised to play a pivotal role in the enablement of 5G. The technology allows operators to run multiple virtual networks on top of a single, physical infrastructure. With 5G commercialization set for 2020, many are wondering to what extend network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) can help move network slicing forward.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail's SDN codebase to Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks has announced its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail, an open-source network virtualisation platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. OpenContrail provides both software-defined networking (SDN) and security features and has been deployed by various organisations, including cloud providers, telecom operators and enterprises to simplify operational complexities and automate workload management across diverse cloud environments.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail’s codebase to Linux Foundation, advances cloud approach
    Juniper Networks plans to move the codebase for its OpenContrail open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud to the Linux Foundation, broadening its efforts to drive more software innovations into the broader IT and service provider community. The vendor is hardly a novice in developing open source platforms. In 2013, Juniper released its Contrail products as open sourced and built a user and developer community around the project. To drive its next growth phase, Juniper expanded the project’s governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort.
  • 3 Essential Questions to Ask at Your Next Tech Interview
    The annual Open Source Jobs Report from Dice and The Linux Foundation reveals a lot about prospects for open source professionals and hiring activity in the year ahead. In this year’s report, 86 percent of tech professionals said that knowing open source has advanced their careers. Yet what happens with all that experience when it comes time for advancing within their own organization or applying for a new roles elsewhere?