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GNOME

Awesome GNOME extensions for developers

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GNOME

Extensions add immense flexibility to the GNOME 3 desktop environment. They give users the advantage of customizing their desktop while adding ease and efficiency to their workflow. The Fedora Magazine has already covered some great desktop extensions such as EasyScreenCast, gTile, and OpenWeather. This article continues that coverage by focusing on extensions tailored for developers.

If you need assistance installing GNOME extensions, refer to the article How to install a GNOME Shell extension.

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Also: Free software desktops to 2020 & beyond

System76 becomes GNOME Foundation Advisory Board member

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GNOME

System76 has long been a huge champion of both Linux and open source. If you aren't familiar, the company sells premium computers running the Ubuntu operating system. Recently, the company decided to create its own Ubuntu-based distro called "Pop!_OS" which uses the GNOME desktop environment.

Today, the Denver, Colorado-based System76 takes its commitment to GNOME even further by becoming a Foundation Advisory Board member. It joins other respected companies on the board such as Google, Red Hat, and Canonical to name a few.

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KDE and GNOME: Offline Vaults, AtCore, KDE Connect and Nautilus

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KDE
GNOME
  • Offline Vaults for an extra layer of protection

    I’m slowly returning to KDE development after a few months of being mostly in bugfix mode due to my other-life obligations (more on that later), so I decided to implement a new feature for my youngest project – the Plasma Vault.

    One of the possible attack vectors to your Plasma Vaults is that people could potentially have access to your computer while the vault is open.

    This is not a problem if we consider direct access because it is something that is easily controlled – you see everyone who approaches your computer, but the problem can be remote access.

  • [AtCore] April progress update

    It has been over a month since my last progress update. Here is what I’ve done.

  • KDE Connect desktop 1.3 released
  • KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus

    KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release.

    KDE Connect already allows functionality like viewing/replying to messages from your desktop, sending browser links to your phone, and other data synchronization abilities. With GNOME not having any compelling alternative to KDE Connect, today's v1.3 release adds in a Nautilus extension that allows users to send files to their phone from the GNOME file manager's context menu.

  • Proposal to add an Action-Info Bar to Nautilus

    We are looking into adding an action & info bar to Nautilus. The background about this proposal can be read on the task where we put the main goals, prior art, different proposals and mockups, etc.

    We are not sure whether this is the appropriate solution and whether the implementation we propose is ideal. In order to be more confident, we would like to gather early feedback on the current proposal. Also, we are looking for ideas on how to improve the overall approach.

    The current proposal is being worked in a branch and can be installed via Flatpak clicking here (Note: You might need to install it the the CLI by executing `flatpak install nautilus-dev.flatpak` due to a bug in Software).

12 Best GTK Themes for Ubuntu and other Linux Distributions

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GNOME

For those of us that use Ubuntu proper, the move from Unity to Gnome as the default desktop environment has made theming and customizing easier than ever. Gnome has a fairly large tweaking community, and there is no shortage of fantastic GTK themes for users to choose from. With that in mind, I went ahead and found some of my favorite themes that I have come across in recent months. These are what I believe offer some of the best experiences that you can find.

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Tumbleweed/KDE and GNOME/GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • Tumbleweed Starts Week with Plasma, DigiKam Updates
  • Community Data Analytics: Now in Technicolor!

    So let's revisit our "whole year 2017 for all of KDEPIM" (that is the parts in KDE Applications, in Extragear and in Playground) with more colors!

    Firstly, this gives us the weekly activity using the "Magma" palette and a linear interpolation of the colors between the minimum and maximum commit counts...

    [...]

    This time we don't even need to zoom in to spot the code KDEPIM contributors in 2017. With the color coding, we see right away again that Laurent Montel, Daniel Vratil and Volker Krause are the core contributors. It's much less guess work than the last time, we're backed by the color coded centrality metric now. We can also better see that Allen Winter, Sandro Knauß and David Faure are very central too, something that we missed the last time.

  • Canta Is An Amazing Material Design GTK Theme

    Canta is a complete Material Design theme. It uses pastel colors in a beautiful blend, with round buttons, tabs, and corners. Subtle, unobtrusive transparency is used sporadically, giving Canta a stylish look.

Diplomatic Munity - Lethal Gnome 2

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GNOME

Several things: MATE 1.20 looks way better on Bionic than my early test. A little bit of customization goes a long way, and there's still more room for improvement. Then, Munity, with its Dash and HUD and whatnot, is a smart and practical nod toward Ubuntu and Unity, and it's way better than Gnome 3. Brings MATE up to modern levels, and it easily achieves parity.

I am quite happy with what MATE is going to bring us, and the 18.04 LTS test might actually prove to be a very sensible and fun distro, with goodies, practicality, speed, and efficiency blended into one compact and solid package. Bugs are to be ironed, for they are Devil's work, and MATE can benefit from extra bling bling. But then, from a bland sub-performer to a nifty desktop, with tons of options and features. Takes some fiddling, and not everything is easily discoverable, but the road to satisfaction is a fairly short and predictable one. Munity is a cool, cool idea, and I'm looking forward to Bionic's official release. Take care.

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‘Dash to Dock’ Adds New Launcher Styles, Support for GNOME 3.28

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GNOME

An updated version of Dash to Dock, the hugely popular GNOME Shell extension, is available to download.

Dash to Dock v63 adds support for the recent GNOME 3.28 release. This means those of you on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Fedora 27 and other Linux distributions can rock out with your dock out — sans any compatibility issues.

But naturally there’s more to this latest release than a version bump.

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Also: The LVFS CDN will change soon

ED Update – Week 14

Update on KDE Development and GNOME Recipes Hackfest

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 12

    Welcome to week 12 in Usability & Productivity! Despite all the awesome improvements I’m about to share, there are EVEN MORE that I wasn’t able to announce this week because they’re not quite done yet! But In the coming weeks, some very nice fixes and improvements are going to land.

  • Recipes hackfest and joining Endless

    On a side note, this was my first week at Endless. The onboarding experience is great and I am very excited about Endless in general. Special thanks to Cosimo Cecchi who guided me all through the process. Delighted to start my career at a great FLOSS-oriented company!

That Huge GNOME Shell Memory Leak? It’s Being Fixed

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GNOME

Some good news: the (rather large) GNOME Shell memory leak we spotlighted last week is in the process of being fixed.

GNOME developers have spent the past week or so trying to identify the root of the issue, which causes system memory usage to increase each minute GNOME Shell is used.

Following our report hundreds of GNOME Shell users across various Linux distros took to internet forums and social media to confirm the memory creep issue exists on their systems.

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Also: Maps, Gitlab, and Meson

GNOME: Fedora 28 Gnome 3.28 Test Day, Performance Fix, and GNOME 3.30 Release Date

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GNOME
  • Fedora 28 Gnome 3.28 Test Day 2018-03-26

    Friday [sic. Monday], 2018-03-26 is the Fedora 28 Gnome 3.28 Test Day! As part of changes Gnome 3.28 in Fedora 28, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • An Important GNOME Performance Fix Has Landed

    GNOME contributor Yussuf Khalil has managed to uncover and resolve a bug in Clutter that was hurting GNOME's performance.

    The developer has begun analyzing GNOME performance issues and one of the first things he uncovered were frequent spikes in GNOME's frametimes at regular intervals. He ended up finding out that the frequent spikes were caused by showing the seconds on the clock within GNOME Shell.

  • GNOME 3.30 Release Date is Set for September 6

    Fans of free, open source desktop environments will be pleased to hear the GNOME 3.30 release date has been set.

    Serving as the next major stable update to the GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.30 is scheduled for release on September 6, 2018.

    Of course, before it gets there there’ll be a slate of alpha, beta and release candidate builds to sample, all tagged under the guise of GNOME 3.29.

    For more details on this cycle’s release, freeze and finalisation dates you can shuffle your eyes over the GNOME release schedule.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs
    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs. DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.
  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support
    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements. Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.
  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs
    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8. In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.
  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt
    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility. First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.
  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years
     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.  

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."