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GNOME

6 reasons why GNOME is still the best Linux desktop environment

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Linux
GNOME

I've been using Linux for about 15 years now, trying multiple desktop environments along the way. For the majority of my career, I was a diehard KDE Plasma user (starting with version 2.x). I stuck with Plasma for the majority of the 4.x series, eventually moving on due to stability issues. I've tried Xfce, MATE, Openbox, and many others, but ever since I switched to GNOME 3, I've never looked back. It's a responsive and stable environment that allows me to focus on my work with minimal distractions.

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GNOME and KDE: Recipes, GUADEC, and Latte dock

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KDE
GNOME
  • Recipes turns one year old

    I’ve given a presentation today and explained that recipes turns one year old at this GUADEC in Manchester. That is of course nothing compared to GNOME, which turned 20, so we send our congratulations:

  • My talk at GUADEC 2017

    Thanks so much to the GNOME Foundation for its support to the events I do to spread the GNOME word in my local community in Peru. I have had the opportunity to share my work done in 2016 and 2017 at GUADEC 2017.

  • [Video] Latte dock - different layouts per activities

GNOME/GTK: Nautilus, Evince, GNOME Calendar, GNOME Photos, Libratbag

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GNOME
  • Nautilus Not Adding Tags, Might Add File Favoriting Instead

    Tags are a super handy way to organize, sort and find files without needing to worry about where you actually put ’em. So, naturally, I was super excited when GNOME developer Alexandru Pandelea began to share word of work he’d done to bring native file tags to Nautilus.

  • After 12 Years, GNOME's Evince Document Viewer Supports Adobe Illustrator Files

    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera reports today on some the improvements coming to the Evince document viewer app as part of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    The biggest change that'll be implemented in Evince 3.26 is the use of the libarchive library for decompressing various archive types, including the CBZ, CB7, and CBT formats that are usually used for comic books, and it also supports RAR files through the use of the unarr command-line utility.

  • GNOME Calendar is now capable of creating/editing recurring events

    I’m glad to announce that GNOME Calendar now supports creation of recurring events. Now you can easily create recurring events with the help of the modified edit-dialog.

  • Enhancing photos with GNOME Photos

    Photos can do more than edit. It also integrates with GNOME Online Accounts, and can be set up to share photos to various online photo services. Photos also lets you organize your photos into albums. It even detects screenshots and automatically sorts them into a Screenshots album for you!

  • Libratbag-Powered Piper Is Looking Good For Configuring Gaming Mice On Linux

    It's not quite ready for primetime yet by Linux gamers, but Piper as the GTK-powered user-interface for controlling gaming mice on Linux is getting into shape.

    Piper is the GTK interface for configuring mice on Linux via libratbag/ratbagd, the library offering a generic way to access various mice features and abstract away hardware/kernel differences.

GNOME's Disks Utility Is Getting Large File Support, Resize and Repair Functions

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GNOME

GNOME's Disks utility (gnome-disk-utility) is getting a lot of attention from its maintainers during the development cycle of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment, and it now looks like there will be new disk resize and repair functions, too.

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GNOME: Evince, GNOME Recipes, Gedit, and GUADEC 2017 in Manchester

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GNOME
  • Evince 3.26 Will Let You View Adobe Illustrator & CBR Files

    Evince, the default document viewer on Ubuntu, is adding support for more file formats. The next stable release, Evince 3.26, due in October, will allow you to view Adobe Illustrator files on Linux without needing to install any additional software. “But wait!”, I hear you cry, “Evince can already do that!”

  • GNOME Recipes 3.26 Cooks Up a Batch of Improvements

    GNOME's Mathias Clasen has dished up an update on GNOME Recipes, the desktop cookery app for Linux, bringing news of several improvements.

  • Wait, Gedit Text Editor is Unmaintained?!

    Gedit is the default text editor on Ubuntu and just about a bajillion other Linux distros — but it’s also unmaintained.

    Did you know that? I didn’t. Not until a reader mentioned it to me earlier today.

    And, sure enough, head over to Gedit page on the GNOME Wiki and you can see for yourself that the project is “no longer maintained” and is “looking for new maintainers”.

  • Going to GUADEC 2017

    This year I am also giving a presentation about the application story in Endless OS. Our infrastructure, our changes to GNOME Software, our heavy use of Flatpak, etc. Hopefully you’ll find it interesting.

GNOME: Nautilus, Recipes, Evince, and GUADEC

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GNOME
  • Tags in Nautilus

    As I mentioned in my last blog post, I spent the last weeks working on tags. Though, just to be clear from the beginning, general tags will probably not make it into the next versions of Nautilus. At the time I found out that this feature should not be included, I already had some of the work done, so I’ll explain below what I accomplished even if it’ll not be part of the next releases.

  • Summer recipes

    While this is a development release, I think it may be time to declare this version (1.6) stable. Therefore, I encourage you to try it out and let me know if something doesn’t work.

  • New Evince format support: Adobe Illustrator and CBR files

    I mentioned that we switched from using external tools for decompression to using libarchive. That's not the whole truth, as we switched to using libarchive for CBZ, CB7 and the infamous CBT, but used a copy/paste version of unarr to support RAR files, as libarchive support lacks some needed features.

  • I’m going to GUADEC

    The GUADEC is approaching and I’m happy to say that I will be there, again! Apart some issues with my laptop[1], everything is packed and ready for the trip. I plan to be in Manchester from tomorrow evening and will stay in there until Thursday next week. Just by looking at the schedule and planned social events, I’m sure that it is going to be an awesome week.

GNOME: GNOME Disks, GNOME Builder, and GNOME Games

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GNOME
  • GNOME Disks: Integrate Resize and Repair

    The basic prototype patches let GNOME Disks resize partitions and their filesystems, check filesystems and repair them – at least when built against UDisks master where the actual work is performed. It needs some fixes on how jobs and UI states correspond but here a glimpse on how the resize looks like.

  • GNOME Disks Gaining Resize & Repair Support
  • GSoC: GNOME Builder: Improving word completion

    A relatively short update about the project. I have implemented a new GtkSourceCompletionProvider to mimick user- requested word-completion feature in Vim.

  • Global Search for GNOME Builder

    In previous post, Indexing multiple languages source code in GNOME Builder, I wrote about how indexing of source code in a project is done in GNOME Builder. Now that we have index of all symbols in the project, this index is used to implement global search of symbols using which we can search fuzzily all symbols in the project.

  • GNOME Games: Touch Support

    Apologies for running a bit late. Had been brewing up some serious potions and not to mention my old nimbus 2000 can’t really live up to expectations now. Almost an antique.  well without a further due, let’s get into explaining you about the spells I’ve been working on.

GTK2/GTK3 Themes and Extension for GNOME

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GNOME
  • Oomox – Generate Color Variants of Numix GTK2/GTK3 Themes

    Oomox is a GUI tool with which you can generate several color variations of Numix (GTK2 / GTK3) themes, as well as Gnome-Colors and Archdroid icon themes. It ships with support for GNOME, Unity, Xfce4 and Openbox desktop environments, and a plethora of built-in presets which can be customized further.

    It is virtually the easiest way to create your own GTK 3.20 theme and thanks to one of the app’s users, Spatry, you can check out Oomox in action in the video below:

  • Get a New Desktop Wallpaper Each Day with this Extension for GNOME

    While Ubuntu’s switch to GNOME doesn’t render all of those methods redundant it does unlock some additional opportunities (like unified lock screen and desktop background) — something that the GNOME extensions framework dramatically simplifies.

GNOME and Other Software

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Dash to Panel – A Cool Icon Taskbar for the GNOME Shell

    Dash to Panel is a customizable open source extension for the GNOME Shell that moves the dash into GNOME’s main panel; combining app launchers and the system tray into one panel like that of KDE Plasma and Windows 7+.

  • GNOME's Mutter Window Manager Now Supports Tablet Wheel Events on Wayland

    The Mutter composite and window manager of the widely-used GNOME desktop environment was updated recently both on the stable and devel channels with a bunch of new features and improvements.

    Mutter 3.24.4 is now the latest stable build of the application, and it's here to add a few important changes for tablets, including improved stability of tablet plugs and unplugs, working window moving and resizing via tablet tools, as well as the implementation of tablet rings/strips configuration.

    In addition, Mutter now no longer throttles motion events on tablet tools, it's capable of handling the left-handed mode on pen/eraser devices, and adds support for tablet wheel events when running under the Wayland display server. Talking about Wayland, the Wacom cursor offset should now work as expected in Mutter 3.24.4.

  • Terminus: A Great Modern And Highly Cutomizable Terminal For Linux

    Are you tired of your default terminal or looking for an alternative which can look cool as well as perform operation in your system? If yes, Terminus is for you which is modern terminal designed to be highly customizable, it will let you enjoy CLI. If you are using Linux since there were CRT monitors with Linux then check out Cool-Retro-Term, which is another great looking terminal application.
    Terminus is built using web technologies based on Electron, it is cross-platform modern age terminal available for (Linux, Windows and Mac), on Linux it is a full terminal which can spawn with a global hotkey, tabs persist after restart, Auto-dock to anyside of any screen, full Unicode and double-width character support. On Windows it supports Classic CMD, PowerShell and Bash on Windows. On Mac it just works.
    Multiple app themes and a myriad of community color schemes for the terminal. Color scheme editor included. Install plugins from the NPM repository, or create your own with Typescript and Angular framework.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

GNOME/GTK: GNOME Shell, GTK+ 4, and Meson Build System

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GNOME
  • GNOME Shell to Finally Show an OSD Pop-up When Changing Volume with Mouse Wheel

    The GNOME Shell user interface component of the popular GNOME desktop environment was updated recently with both a stable and a development release for the GNOME 3.24 and upcoming GNOME 3.26 series.

    GNOME Shell 3.24.3 and 3.25.4 releases are now available, and while the first should soon make its way into the stable repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution, that if you're using the GNOME desktop environment, the latter is a development version published as part of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 release.

  • The Road to GTK+ 4 Toolkit Continues with Native File Chooser Support for OS X

    The road to the major GTK+ 4 open-source and multi-platform toolkit for creating graphical user interfaces or GUIs continues with the GTK+ 3.91.1 development release, which adds a significant number of improvements.

    GTK+ 3.91.1 has been released nearly two months after the 3.90.0 version, which introduced initial support for Apple's OS X operating system, along with initial support for the Meson build system. GTK+ 3.91.1 is here now to add native file chooser support for OS X.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Continues Its Migration to the Meson Build System

    GNOME developer Javier Jardón announced the release and immediate availability of the fourth development milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    After a two-day delay, the GNOME 3.25.4 development snapshot is here, and it's the last before GNOME 3.26 enters Beta, which will happen right after the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2017 event, which will take place in Manchester, United Kingdom, from Friday, July 28 until Wednesday, August 2.

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Today in Techrights

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.