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Introducing GNOME 3.28: “Chongqing”

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GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors.

3.28 has been named “Chongqing” in recognition of the team behind GNOME.Asia 2017. GNOME.Asia is GNOME’s official annual summit in Asia, which is only possible thanks to the hard work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Chongqing, China, and we’d like to thank everyone who contributed to its success.

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Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

GNOME 3.28 'Chongqing' Linux and BSD desktop environment is here

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Officially Released

GNOME 3.28rc2 (2.27.92) RELEASED

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Remember this is the end of this development cycle, enjoy it as fast
as you can, the final release is scheduled next Wednesday!

We remind you we are string frozen, no string changes may be made
without confirmation from the l10n team (gnome-i18n@) and notification
to both the release team and the GNOME Documentation Project

Hard code freeze is also in place, no source code changes can be made
without approval from the release-team. Translation and documentation
can continue.

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Also: GNOME 3.28-RC2 Released

KDE and GNOME: KDE Plasma on Arch Linux, Konsole KDE Store Integration, Call For Improving Cairo Rendering

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  • Install KDE Plasma on Arch Linux

    KDE Plasma Desktop Environment is one of the cleanest, fastest, and polished desktop environments on Linux. KDE 5 desktop needs less memory to run. It is lightweight. It is also very responsive. KDE 5 is my favorite desktop environment.

    In this article, I will show you how to install KDE 5 Plasma desktop environment on Arch Linux. Let’s get started.

  • Konsole KDE Store Integration

    Git master of Konsole recently grew integration for content along with a new category on the store for Konsole color schemes.

    Soon you’ll be able to get a fresh look for your terminal without leaving the window or having to mess with copying around files manually!

  • A Call For Improving Cairo Rendering With Its Own Test Suite No Longer Even Passing

    GNOME developer Federico Mena-Quintero has made a call to action for trying to get some support for improving Cairo, the widely-used 2D rendering library. Its own test suite is no longer passing with interest in Cairo seeming to wane these days.

    From the GNOME side, Cairo is still heavily relied upon for 2D rendering by components such as librsvg. While Federico was investigating some Cairo crashes, he realized Cairo's very thorough test suite isn't even passing itself. It's not even passing with Cairo's pure software-rendered test suite that should theoretically always be working.

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Input Methods in GTK+ 4, Helping Cairo, and an Extension Lets You Quickly Browse Files & Folders in GNOME Shell

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  • Input methods in GTK+ 4

    GTK’s support for loadable modules dates back to the beginning of time, which is why GTK has a lot of code to deal with GTypeModules and with search paths, etc. Much later on, Alex revisited this topic for GVfs, and came up with the concept of extension points and GIO modules, which implement them. This is a much nicer framework, and GTK 4 is the perfect opportunity for us to switch to using it.

  • Helping Cairo

    Cairo needs help. It is the main 2D rendering library we use in GNOME, and in particular, it's what librsvg uses to render all SVGs.

    My immediate problem with Cairo is that it explodes when called with floating-point coordinates that fall outside the range that its internal fixed-point numbers can represent. There is no validation of incoming data, so the polygon intersector ends up with data that makes no sense, and it crashes.

    I've been studying how Cairo converts from floating-point to its fixed-point representation, and it's a nifty little algorithm. So I thought, no problem, I'll add validation, see how to represent the error state internally in Cairo, and see if clients are happy with getting back a cairo_t in an error state.

  • This Extension Lets You Quickly Browse Files & Folders in GNOME Shell

    I’m pretty happy with the GNOME Shell desktop Ubuntu switched to last October, but I do miss being able to quickly browse and open my files from the Unity Dash.

    But I need miss it no more.

    A new GNOME extension brings similar file view functionality to the GNOME Shell desktop.

KDE and GNOME/Gtk Leftovers

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The GNOME Recipes Hackfest

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  • Recipes hackfest

    The Recipes application started as a celebration of GNOME’s community and history, and it’s grown to be a great showcase for what GNOME is about...

  • Recipes hackfest, day 1

    It has been a bit quiet around GNOME recipes recently, since most of us have other obligations. But this is about to change; we’re currently having a hackfest about GNOME recipes in Jogyakarta, Indonesia, and we’ve already made some interesting plans for for future work in this app.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Plasma 5.13 and Arrongin GTK

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  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Should Be Starting Up Even Faster

    One of the nice elements of KDE Plasma 5.12 is that it starts up faster, particularly when running on Wayland, but with Plasma 5.13 it's looking like it will be an even faster experience getting to the Plasma desktop.

    KDE Plasma 5.13 isn't scheduled to be released until the middle of June, but this next Plasma installment is already in heavy feature development following this month's successful Plasma 5.12 debut.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 7

    Another busy week in Usability & Productivity. As has been observed, we’re fixing issues at Warp 9 speed! KDE contributors racked up some pretty significant wins this week, and we’ve already got some great stuff in the pipeline that I hope to be able to announce next week! But for now, take a look at this week’s haul!

  • Arrongin GTK Theme Stands Out (But for the Right Reasons)

    Sure, the new Ubuntu theme is pretty great, but it’s still largely a mix of Ambiance, Adwaita and the proposed Unity 8 style. I.e. all known quantities.

    We’ve previously listed what we think are the best GTK themes for Ubuntu (and Linux in general). If you’ve read that list you may have noticed that a number of themes featured look similar, share design trends, or use a similar theme as a foundation.

    With former theme makers like ~half-left no longer making truly original GTK themes, Linux design has fallen into a bit of a creative lull. Every other theme that appears is (seemingly) based on either Adwaita, Arc or Adapta, uses material design cues (like Pop GTK), echoes macOS (Greybird, elementary) or is flatter than the response to most of my jokes (Arc, Plano, Ant, Vimix, et al).

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

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  • This week in Discover, part 7

    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.

  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support

    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.

  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline

    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make.

    Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.

  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2

    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.

GNOME and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg

    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.

  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement

    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach

    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.

  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

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  • Kdenlive Café tonight and beta AppImage

    The last months for Kdenlive have been very quiet from the outside – we were not very active on the bugtracker, did not make a lot of announcements, and the 17.12.x release cycle only contained very few minor bugfixes.

    The main reason for this was the huge work that went behind the scenes for a major code refactoring that was required to allow further developments. So after more than a year working on it, we hope to get ready for the 18.04 release!

  • [Krita] Interview with Christine Garner

    I did Archaeology in University and I love history, mythology, folklore and nature. I’ve always been drawing from an early age. I graduated in 2003 with an archaeology degree. I taught myself digital art and web coding skills for fun and practical reasons. I used to do self-employed web design and admin type jobs, but in 2013 I became disillusioned with my life and had depression. I took a Foundation art course in 2013 deciding to pursue my artistic passions instead.

  • Qt 5.11 Brings New Accessibility Backend on Windows

    Accessibility technology encompasses assistive tools such as screen readers, magnifiers and braille displays, as well as APIs and frameworks that allow applications to expose elements of their UI to such tools.

  • CSS Grid

    This would totally have been a tweet or a facebook post, but I’ve decided to invest a little more energy and post these on my blog, accessible to everybody. Getting old, I guess. We’re all mortal and the web isn’t open by its own.

    In the past few days I’ve been learning about CSS grid while redesigning Flatpak and Flathub sites (still coming). And with the knowledge of really grokking only a fraction of it, I’m in love.

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More in Tux Machines

2018 Affiliate and Individual Member Election Results

The OSI would like to thank all of those who ran for the Board. Volunteering to serve the OSI and support the Open Source community is a tremendous commitment in time and energy--we truly appreciate their willingness to contribute to our continued success and participate in our ongoing work to promote and protect open source software, communities, and development as well as the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. The winners of the 2018 Board of Directors elections are, VM Brasseur (elected by the Individual Membership) Chris Lamb (elected by the Affiliate Membership) Faidon Liambotis (elected by the Affiliate Membership) Josh Simmons (elected by the Individual Membership) Read more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

Games and Wine: Dark Old Sun, Surviving Mars, Wine-Staging 3.4, Wine 3.4

  • Varied shoot 'em up Dark Old Sun adds Linux support, lots of different enemies and upgrades to try
    For those who can't get enough shoot 'em up action, Dark Old Sun [Steam] recently added Linux support and it looks pretty varied. It originally released on March 8th, with Linux support arriving only a few days later on the 16th.  It has three different game modes: An Arcade/Story mode with 6 different stages, a Challenge mode and a Survival mode where you face off against waves of enemies and random events.
  • Surviving Mars already has a fix out for the Linux text problem, plus more thoughts
  • Looking for a Battle Royale game that works on Linux? 2D browser-based is one
    I know, a bunch of you are probably already running away due to it being browser-based, but I find that really quite interesting. is actually not bad at all. Basic of course, since it's a top-down 2D game that runs directly in the browser, but that's also what makes it so interesting. You can play it on basically anything and if you want to team up with someone, it generates a link for you to send them and away you go. You can also play with strangers on a team as well, which also works surprisingly well with the simple emotes system to give them a thumbs up, or a sad face.
  • Wine-Staging 3.4 Released With MS Office Anti-Aliased Fonts, BattlEye Fixes
    Fresh off the release of Wine 3.4 on Friday, the maintainers corralling the Wine-Staging releases have now put out their second modern release. Wine-Staging 3.4 was released minutes ago since Alistair Leslie-Hughes managed to take-over the Wine-Staging maintenance and get out the recent v3.3 release. They have continued re-basing their patches against Wine upstream, more than 1000 in total. They are also working to upstream those patches where appropriate.
  • Wine 3.4 released with more Vulkan support
    Another Wine development release with Wine 3.4 that continues to add in more Vulkan support making another exciting release.