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GNOME: Memory Leak, Continues Integration in Librsvg, GNOME Builder and More

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  • Big Memory Leak Bug Found In GNOME Shell; Might Remain Unpatched In Ubuntu 18.04

    For now, the users who couldn’t benefit from the patch can restart Gnome Shell after a couple of hours to free up memory. To do this, press Alt + F2. Then type r and press Enter.

  • Continues Integration in Librsvg, Part 1

    Rust makes it trivial to write any kind of tests for your project. But what good are they if you do not run them? In this blog series I am gonna explore the capabilities of Gitlab-CI and document how it is used in Librsvg.

  • Continues Integration in Librsvg, Part 2
  • Continues Integration in Librsvg, Part 3

    Generally 5min/job does not seem like a terribly long time to wait, but it can add up really quickly when you add couple of jobs to the pipeline. First let’s take a look where most of the time is spent. First of jobs currently are spawned in a clean environment, which means each time we want to build the Rust part of librsvg, we download the whole cargo registry and all of the cargo dependencies each time. That’s our first low hanging fruit! Apart from that another side-effect of the clean environment is that we build librsvg from scratch each time, meaning we don’t make use of the incremental compilation that modern compilers offer. So let’s get started.

  • [GNOME] Builder Nightly

    One of the great aspects of the Flatpak model, apart from separating apps from the OS, is that you can have multiple versions of the same app installed concurrently. You can rely on the stable release while trying things out in the development or nightly built version. This creates a need to easily identify the two versions apart when launching it with the shell.

  • SVG Rendering and GSVGtk

    For SVG rendering, we have few options: librsvg, as the most popular one,,and Lasem, maybe others. Both take an SVG file, parse it and render it over specified Cairo.Context.

  • GTask and Threaded Workers

    GTask is super handy, but it’s important you’re very careful with it when threading is involved.

  • gksu is dead. Long live PolicyKit

    Today, gksu was removed from Debian unstable. It was already removed 2 months ago from Debian Testing (which will eventually be released as Debian 10 “Buster”).

Ubuntu's Bionic Beaver brings GNOME 3.28, minimal installation, and faster booting (in theory)

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Bionic Beaver. That's right. Canonical has chosen what might well be the greatest name for a desktop release in the history of technology. And, of course, with a name like Bionic Beaver, you'd expect great things to come from this borg-ian, nocturnal, semi-aquatic rodent. With a release date of April 21, 2018, there isn't much time remaining to anticipate what's to come.

Good thing you don't have to wait to find out what new and improved features are on their way. However, is the wait worth it? For the longest time, Ubuntu releases were rather boring, offering next to nothing in the way of improvements. It wasn't until Canonical made the switch from Unity to GNOME that releases were, once again, interesting. Nomenclature aside, Bionic Beaver should not disappoint users. The developers have done a masterful job of creating a release that brings a bit of excitement along for the ride.

Let's take a look at what Bionic Beaver has in store.

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Also: Umm, GNOME Shell Has a Rather Big Memory Leak

GNOME: GitLab Migration and More

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  • IMPORTANT: GitLab mass migration plan

    I know some fellows doesn’t read desktop-devel-list, so let me share here an email that it’s important for all to read: We have put in place the plan for the mass migration to GitLab and the steps maintainers needs to do.

  • ED Update – week 11
  • Reflections on Distractions in Work, Productivity and Time Usage

    For the past year or so I have mostly worked at home or remote in my daily life. Currently I’m engaged in my master thesis and need to manage my daily time and energy to work on it. It is no surprise to many of us that working using your internet-connected personal computer at home can make you prone to many distractions. However, managing your own time is not just about whipping and self-discipline. It is about setting yourself up in a structure which rewards you for hard work and gives your mind the breaks it needs. Based on reflections and experimentation with many scheduling systems and tools I finally felt I have achieved a set of principles I really like and that’s what I’ll be sharing with you today.


    Minimizing shell notifications: While I don’t have the same big hammer to “block access to my e-mail” here, I decided to change the order of my e-mail inboxes in Geary so my more relevant (and far less activity prone) student e-mail inbox appears first. I also turned off the background e-mail daemon and turned off notification banners in GNOME Shell.


    Lastly, I want to give two additional tips. If you like listening to music while working, consider whether it might affect your productivity. For example, I found music with vocals to be distracting me if I try to immerse myself in reading difficult litterature. I can really recommend Doctor Turtle’s acoustic instrumental music while working though (all free). Secondly, I find that different types of tasks requires different postures. For abstract, high-level or vaguely formulated tasks (fx formulating goals, reviewing something or reflecting), I find interacting with the computer whilst standing up and walking around to really help gather my thoughts. On the other hand with practical tasks or tasks which require immersion (fx programming tasks), I find sitting down to be much more comfortable.

GStreamer 1.14

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  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.11 / plugin writing infrastructure 0.2 release

    Following the GStreamer 1.14 release and the new round of gtk-rs releases, there are also new releases for the GStreamer Rust bindings (0.11) and the plugin writing infrastructure (0.2).

  • GStreamer 1.14.0 Released With WebRTC Support, AV1 Video & Better Rust Bindings

    GStreamer 1.14.0 is now available as the first big feature release of 2018 for this widely-used, open-source multimedia framework.

    GStreamer 1.14 packs in many new features including experimental AV1 video codec support for that royalty-free specification, IPC pipeline improvements, RTSP 2.0 client/server support (Real Time Streaming Protocol 2.0), LAME/mpg123/twolame being promoted to the "good" plugin repository now that the related patents have expired for MP3, improved OpenGL integration, initial WebRTC support for real-time communication, and many other improvements.

GNOME: New Flow, GNOME 3.28, New Shotwell

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  • GitLab + Flatpak – GNOME’s full flow

    In this post I will explain how GitLab, CI, Flatpak and GNOME apps come together into a (imho) dream-come-true full flow for GNOME, a proposal to be implemented by all GNOME apps.

  • GNOME 3.28 released & coming to Fedora 28

    Last week, The GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.28. This major release of the GNOME desktop is the default desktop environment in the upcoming release of Fedora 28 Workstation. 3.28 includes a wide range of enhancements, including updates to Files (nautilus), Contacts, Calendar, Clocks and the on-screen keyboard. Additionally, the new application Usage is added to “make it easy to diagnose and resolve performance and capacity issues”

  • Shotwell Photo Manager Just Got a Big Performance Boost

    A new version of the Shotwell photo manager and editor is available to download. Shotwell 0.28 “Braunschweig” arrives half a year later than originally planned but hasn’t shirked on improvements or bug fixes during the wait. In all some 60 bugs have been closed since the Shotwell 0.27 release last year...

Here’s GNOME 3.28 – See What’s New

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The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.28 contains six months of work and new features by the GNOME community and comes with many improvements and new features.

One major new feature for this release is automatic downloading of operating systems in Boxes, which takes the work out of creating and running virtual machines – just pick the operating system that you want to create a virtual machine of, and Boxes will now download and install it for you.

Other highlights include improvements to the Calendar and Contacts applications, the ability to star files and folders in the Files application, and improved support for Thunderbolt 3 and Bluetooth LE devices. GNOME’s default UI font has also been overhauled to be more attractive and easy to read, and the on-screen keyboard has been rewritten to be more reliable and has layouts for a number of different locales.

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Also: textures and paintables

Coming Soon: Shotwell 0.28, KDE Applications 18.04

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  • On the way to 0.28

    Shotwell 0.28 “Braunschweig” is out.

    Half a year later than I was expecting it to be, sorry. This release fixes 60 Bugs! Get it at GNOME’s download server, from GIT or in the Shotwell PPA really soon™. A big thank you to all contributors that make up all the bits and pieces for such a release.

  • Dolphin Getting More Improvements For KDE Applications 18.04 & Other KDE Happenings

    KDE contributor Nathaniel Graham is out with another recap of the usability and productivity improvements made this past week by the KDE community.

    The Dolphin file manager has been seeing improvements recently. The latest Dolphin work includes help for installing Konsole if it's not available when trying to launch the terminal pane, reporting of a symlink's target fi

Introducing GNOME 3.28: “Chongqing”

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GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors.

3.28 has been named “Chongqing” in recognition of the team behind GNOME.Asia 2017. GNOME.Asia is GNOME’s official annual summit in Asia, which is only possible thanks to the hard work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Chongqing, China, and we’d like to thank everyone who contributed to its success.

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Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

GNOME 3.28 'Chongqing' Linux and BSD desktop environment is here

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Officially Released

GNOME 3.28rc2 (2.27.92) RELEASED

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Remember this is the end of this development cycle, enjoy it as fast
as you can, the final release is scheduled next Wednesday!

We remind you we are string frozen, no string changes may be made
without confirmation from the l10n team (gnome-i18n@) and notification
to both the release team and the GNOME Documentation Project

Hard code freeze is also in place, no source code changes can be made
without approval from the release-team. Translation and documentation
can continue.

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Also: GNOME 3.28-RC2 Released

KDE and GNOME: KDE Plasma on Arch Linux, Konsole KDE Store Integration, Call For Improving Cairo Rendering

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  • Install KDE Plasma on Arch Linux

    KDE Plasma Desktop Environment is one of the cleanest, fastest, and polished desktop environments on Linux. KDE 5 desktop needs less memory to run. It is lightweight. It is also very responsive. KDE 5 is my favorite desktop environment.

    In this article, I will show you how to install KDE 5 Plasma desktop environment on Arch Linux. Let’s get started.

  • Konsole KDE Store Integration

    Git master of Konsole recently grew integration for content along with a new category on the store for Konsole color schemes.

    Soon you’ll be able to get a fresh look for your terminal without leaving the window or having to mess with copying around files manually!

  • A Call For Improving Cairo Rendering With Its Own Test Suite No Longer Even Passing

    GNOME developer Federico Mena-Quintero has made a call to action for trying to get some support for improving Cairo, the widely-used 2D rendering library. Its own test suite is no longer passing with interest in Cairo seeming to wane these days.

    From the GNOME side, Cairo is still heavily relied upon for 2D rendering by components such as librsvg. While Federico was investigating some Cairo crashes, he realized Cairo's very thorough test suite isn't even passing itself. It's not even passing with Cairo's pure software-rendered test suite that should theoretically always be working.

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This is the New Ubuntu 18.04 Default Wallpaper

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Node.js Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other GNU/Linux Distributions

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