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GNOME

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

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KDE
GNOME
  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now

    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community.

    "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."

  • Interview with Rytelier

    The amount of convenience is very high compared to other programs. The amount of “this one should be designed in a better way, it annoys me” things is the smallest of all the programs I use, and if something is broken, then most of these functions are announced to improve in 4.0.

  • Grow your skills with GNOME

    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.

  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support

    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes.

    Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Best Gnome distro of 2017

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GNOME

And the winner is …

Well, I’ve never ever believed I’d say this, but being objective and all, it’s an Arch-based distribution that gets the highest accolade in this test – Antergos 17.9! Do mind, it’s not perfect, but it does offer a reasonably rounded experience with some really interesting (and unique) features. Like most small projects, it does suffer from obvious lack of manpower needed to tackle the usability papercuts, but on the other hand, it brings in innovation that is not apparent in other distributions, and it also provides a solid baseline for day-to-day use, without compromising on stability, and without ever disclosing its geeky DNA.

My experience with Antergos 17.9 shows a distribution that is relatively sprightly, focuses on usability, offers excellent driver support, and tries to balance beauty with functionality. It still struggles gluing all these together, but there do not seem to be any fundamental flaws. It also manages to showcase Gnome in a very positive light, which cannot be said of pretty much any other candidate that I’ve had a chance to test this year. If anything, the outcome of 2017 is satisfying in its own right, even though I did struggle and suffer a lot while playing and testing these different distributions. But in one sentence, if you do need a Gnome distro, this is the best that I can offer and recommend. And it wouldn’t be a bad recommendation either. All right, that was two sentences.

Conclusion

Back in December 2016, I said Gnome is slowly recovering. Scratch that. It was a brief flicker of hope, and it’s gone. It would seem the direction has reversed, and the Gnome desktop is becoming less usable. Its overall design remains stubbornly unchanged while the quality and stability are constantly deteriorating.

Still, an odd distro or two manage to rise above the mediocrity and provide a relatively reasonable desktop session, Gnome notwithstanding. For 2017, Antergos is Dedoimedo’s Gnome choice. You get an okay mix of everything, solid performance, a stable behavior, and a few glitches just to keep you on your toes. Most impressive is the graphics stack support, very elegant looks, and tons of great software. If you’ve never considered Arch in its many guises and sacrificial forms, then Antergos seems like a good starting point.

But wait, what if I don’t like Gnome, you asketh? Despair not! In the coming days, we will also look at what Xfce and Plasma have to offer. It shall be most interesting. Stay tuned.

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Also: OSK update

GNOME: Outreachy, World Clocks, UX Hackfest London

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GNOME
  • Outreachy's finally here !

    It’s been a month since the Outreachy Round 15 results were announced . Yay! my proposal for adding a network panel to GNOME Usage was selected. I am glad to be working on something I personally have been longing for. Moreover, I finally have something to cut down on my Xbox addiction and channelize it into bringing the network panel to life.

  • UTC and Anywhere on Earth support

    A quick post to tell you that we finally added UTC support to Clocks' and the Shell's World Clocks section. And if you're into it, there's also Anywhere on Earth support.

    You will need to have git master versions of libgweather (our cities and timezones database), and gnome-clocks. This feature will land in GNOME 3.28.

  • UX Hackfest London

    Last week I took part in the GNOME Shell UX Hackfest in London, along with other designers and developers from GNOME and adjacent communities such as Endless, Pop!, and elementary. We talked about big, fundamental things, like app launching and the lock/login screen, as well as some smaller items, like the first-run experience and legacy window decorations.

GNOME: GNOME Boxes and ColorHug

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GNOME
  • GNOME Boxes Makes It Easier to Test Drive Linux Distros

    The next major release of GNOME Boxes is able to download popular Linux (and BSD-based) operating systems directly inside the app itself.

    Boxes is free, open-source software. It can be used to access both remote and virtual systems as it is built around QEMU, KVM, and libvirt virtualisation technologies.

    For its new ISO-toting integration Boxes makes use of libosinfo, a database of operating systems that also provides details on any virtualized environment requirements.

  • Download and install operating systems directly in GNONE Boxes

    If you are closely following the development of GNOME Boxes, you probably have read Debarshi’s announcement of this new feature that allows you to download and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux gratis directly from Boxes.

  • ColorHug Plus Update

    I’ll update the website at some point this evening, I’m not sure whether to just post all this or remove the ColorHug+ page completely. Perhaps a sad announcement, but perhaps not one that’s too unexpected considering the lack of updates in the last few months. Sorry to disappoint everybody.

Top 20 GNOME Extensions You Should Be Using Right Now

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GNOME

The capacity of your GNOME desktop can be enhanced with extensions. Here is a list of the best GNOME extensions to save you the trouble of finding them on your own.
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KDE and GNOME: Qt 5.10.0 RC, Evolving KDE, and GNOME at London UX Hackfest

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KDE
GNOME
  • Qt 5.10 Release Candidate Arrives Late

    Qt 5.10 RC was expected back on 16 November but only this morning is making its debut.

    While arriving nearly two weeks late, The Qt Company is still hoping to get the official Qt 5.10.0 release out on time, which has been scheduled for 30 November. Thus there's basically two days left to get the release candidate tested if getting the release out on time.

  • Qt 5.10.0 RC out

    We are targeting to get final Qt 5.10.0 out 30.11.2017 as planned so please test the packages now & report me immediately if you find something which should really block the release. But remember: We won't block the release without really good reasons. Qt 5.10.1 will be released quite quickly so if we can live with issue as known issue in Qt 5.10.0 we will. So please add those issues directly in known issues page (https://wiki.qt.io/Qt_5.10.0_Known_Issues).

  • Evolving KDE – The goals are set!

    Since Akademy in Almería we have been going through the process of defining goals for KDE for the next 3 to 4 years. Different ideas were proposed and refined. 10 of them made it into the community-wide vote to select 3 of them. Today I am proud to announce the result based on the 684 submitted votes.

  • KDE's Goals For The Next 3~4 Years

    Since this year's KDE Akademy conference, KDE developers have been plotting their vision for the next few years and recently wrapped up voting on what should be their three main goals to focus on over the next few years.

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  • London UX Hackfest

    Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, a handful of designers and developers got together last week in London to refocus on the core element of the GNOME experience, the shell. Allan and Cassidy have already summed up everything in their well written blog posts, so I’d like to point to some pretty pictures and the video above.

Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops.

And now almost exactly six years after Ubuntu first switched from GNOME 2 to the Unity desktop, that has been dropped, too. The distro is back to GNOME, and Canonical recently released Ubuntu 17.10, a major update with some significant changes coming to the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Builder 3.27 Progress

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GNOME

We are a couple of months into Builder’s 3.28 development. We have fewer big ticket features scheduled this cycle when compared to 3.26. However that is replaced by a multitude of smaller features and details. Let’s take a look at some of what has been done already.

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Also: GNOME Builder Development Environment Picking Up Many Features For GNOME 3.28

Recommended GNOME Shell Extensions for Ubuntu 17.10

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GNOME
Ubuntu

This is a list of GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that are very useful for Ubuntu 17.10 users. Among them are NetSpeed (to show up/down speed), Dash to Panel (to combine all panels into single bottom panel), Datetime Format (to show complete day-date-clock at top panel), even EasyScreenCast (to record your desktop activity to video), and more. They are handy for many user's daily/repeating tasks, easy to install, and user-friendly to operate. Finally, I hope this recommendation article is useful for you.

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gThumb 3.6 GNOME Image Viewer Released with Better Wayland and HiDPI Support

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GNOME

gThumb, the open-source image viewer for the GNOME desktop environment, has been updated this week to version 3.6, a new stable branch that introduces numerous new features and improvements.

gThumb 3.6 comes with better support for the next-generation Wayland display server as the built-in video player, color profiles, and application icon received Wayland support. The video player component received a "Loop" button to allow you to loop videos, and there's now support for HiDPI displays.

The app also ships with a color picker, a new option to open files in full-screen, a zoom popover that offers different zoom commands and a zoom slider, support for double-click activation, faster image loading, aspect ratio filtering, and the ability to display the description of the color profile in the property view.

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Also: Many Broadway HTML5 Backend Improvements Land In GTK4

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Radeon Benchmarks, New Games, and CrossOver 17

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. RADV/RadeonSI Radeon Linux Gaming Performance
    With today's AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver release alongside the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver for Windows users, it's significant in a few ways. First and foremost, AMD has stuck to their word of the past two years and is now able to open-source their official Vulkan Linux driver. When it comes to AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 itself you are now able to mix-and-match driver components to choose what pieces you want of AMD's somewhat complicated driver make-up. Additionally, their OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in 17.50 have some new feature capabilities. So with that said here's a fresh look at how the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 professional driver performance compares to the latest open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers.
  • The End Is Nigh for Linux gamers is now out of beta on Steam
    Did you get a little worried at the start of that headline? Fret not, as it's about the game 'The End Is Nigh' and it's now out of beta on Steam for Linux.
  • The GOG winter sale is on, you can grab Grim Fandango Remastered for free
  • Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games Directly on Your Mac or Linux OS
    It’s almost 2018, and for some reason there still exists an obnoxious barrier between Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems when it comes to running apps and playing games. CrossOver 17 for Linux was designed to break that tedious barrier down, by allowing you to run your favorite Windows apps and games directly on your Mac or Linux computer, and it’s available for over 50% off at just $19.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • NVIDIA Pushes Out CUDA 9.1 With Compiler Optimizations, Volta Enhancements & More
    AMD isn't the only one busy with GPU software updates today but NVIDIA has issued CUDA 9.1 as their first feature update to the CUDA 9 compute platform.
  • Happy Holidays: AMD Finally Pushing Out Open-Source Vulkan Driver
    Ahead of the Vulkan 1.0 debut nearly two years ago, we heard that for AMD's Vulkan Linux driver it was initially going to be closed-source and would then be open-sourced once ready. At the time it sounded like something that would be opened up six months or so, but finally that milestone is being reached! Ahead of Christmas, AMD is publishing the source code to their official Vulkan Linux driver.
  • The Feature Differences Now Between AMD's Two OpenGL & Two Vulkan Linux Drivers
    For modern AMD graphics cards there are two OpenGL drivers and two Vulkan drivers available to Linux users/gamers that support the same modern AMD GPUs, not counting the older AMD Linux drivers, etc. Here's a rundown now on how those drivers compare. With AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 now allowing you to mix and match driver components and AMD finally open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver, the scene may be even more confusing about which AMD Linux driver(s) to use depending upon your use-case.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers
    There's more Radeon Linux excitement today beyond AMD finally open-sourcing their Vulkan driver. Coming out today is the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 driver that bundles in the open-source RADV and RadeonSI drivers too, in letting you "mix and match" the driver components you want for your system.

End of Fedora 27 Modular Server

  • Fedora 27 Server classic release after all — and Modularity goes back to the drawing board
    You may remember reading about plans for Fedora 27 Server. The working group decided not to release that at the same time as the general F27 release, and instead provided a beta of Fedora 27 Modular Server. Based on feedback from that beta, they decided to take a different approach, and the Modularity subproject is going back to the drawing board. Fortunately, there is a contingency plan: Fedora’s release engineering team made a “classic” version of Fedora 27 Server — very similar to F26 Server, but with F27’s updated package set. The quality assurance ran this version through validation testing, and it’s being released, so:
  • Fedora 27 Modular Server Gets Canned; Fedora 27 Server Classic Released
    - The Fedora Project's plans on delivering an initial "Fedora 27 Modular Server" build constructed under their new packaging principles has been thwarted. Due to less than stellar feedback on their Fedora 27 Modular Server build, the Fedora Modular working group is going back to the drawing board for determining a brighter future to its design. Previous to being canned, F27 Modular Server was delayed to January but is now being abandoned in its current form.

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day