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GNOME

Ubuntu 17.10 Launches Tomorrow with GNOME 3.26, but You Can Still Use Unity

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche shared today the last blog article for the development cycle of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, which is expected to launch tomorrow, October 19.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.10 is back on track with GNOME: Here's why that's a good thing

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 16

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GNOME
Ubuntu

All good things must come to an end, however, in that particular case, it’s rather a beginning! We are indeed almost done in our road to Artful, which means that 17.10 is just around the corner: official Ubuntu 17.10 release is due tomorrow. Of course, it doesn’t mean we stop right away working on it: you will have bug fixes and security updates for 9 months of support! It’s thus time to close this series on Artful, and for this, we are going to tackle one topic we didn’t get to yet, which is quite important approaching the release: upgrading from a previous Ubuntu release! For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME 3.28 to Bring Support for Hybrid GPU Systems to Its Mutter Window Manager

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GNOME

The development cycle of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment kicked off with a bunch of updates for various of the core components and apps, including Mutter and GNOME Shell.

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Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Will Add Google Safe Browsing Support to Epiphany Web Browser

Software: VirtualBox 5.1.30, Cockpit 153, GNOME Mutter 3.27.1, KDE Neon

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KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.30 to Patch Glibc 2.26 Compile Bug on Linux Hosts

    Oracle released VirtualBox 5.1.30, a minor maintenance update to the open-source and cross-platform virtualization software that addresses a few important issues reported by users from previous versions.

    Coming one month after the VirtualBox 5.1.28 release, which probably most of you out there use right now on your personal computers, VirtualBox 5.1.30 contains a fix for a Glibc 2.26 compilation bug for Linux hosts and a 3D-related crash for Windows guest that use the Windows Additions package.

  • Cockpit 153

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 153.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.27.1 Brings Hybrid GPU Support

    Mutter 3.27.1 has just been released as the first development release for the GNOME 3.28 cycle of this compositor / window manager.

    The change most interesting to us about Mutter 3.27.1 is support for hybrid GPU systems. The context for the hybrid GPU system support is explained via this bug report, "supporting systems with multiple GPUs connected to their own connectors. A common configuration is laptops with an integrated Intel GPU connected to the panel, and a dedicated Nvidia/AMD GPU connected to the HDMI ports."

  • #KDE #KDENEON Release bonanaza! Frameworks, Plasma, KmyMoney and Digikam

GNOME: LVFS and Epiphany

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GNOME
  • Richard Hughes: Shaking the tin for LVFS: Asking for donations!

    Nearly 100 million files are downloaded from the LVFS every month, the majority being metadata to know what updates are available. Although each metadata file is very small it still adds up to over 1TB in transfered bytes per month. Amazon has kindly given the LVFS a 2000 USD per year open source grant which more than covers the hosting costs and any test EC2 instances. I really appreciate the donation from Amazon as it allows us to continue to grow, both with the number of Linux clients connecting every hour, and with the number of firmware files hosted. Before the grant sometimes Red Hat would pay the bandwidth bill, and other times it was just paid out my own pocket, so the grant does mean a lot to me. Amazon seemed very friendly towards this kind of open source shared infrastructure, so kudos to them for that.

    At the moment the secure part of the LVFS is hosted in a dedicated Scaleway instance, so any additional donations would be spent on paying this small bill and perhaps more importantly buying some (2nd hand?) hardware to include as part of our release-time QA checks.

  • Epiphany 3.28 Development Kicks Off With Safe Browsing, Better Flatpak Handling

    Epiphany 3.27.1 was released a short time ago as the first development release of this web-browser for the GNOME 3.28 cycle.

    For being early in the development cycle there is already a fair number of improvements with Epiphany 3.27.1. Some of the highlights include Google Safe Browsing support, a new address bar dropdown powered by libdazzle, and improvements to the Flatpak support.

  • Safe Browsing in Epiphany

    I am pleased to announce that Epiphany users will now benefit from a safe browsing support which is capable to detect and alert users whenever they are visiting a potential malicious website. This feature will be shipped in GNOME 3.28, but those who don’t wish to wait that long can go ahead and build Epiphany from master to benefit from it.

    The safe browsing support is enabled by default in Epiphany, but you can always disable it from the preferences dialog by toggling the checkbox under General -> Web Content -> Try to block dangerous websites.

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 15

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Most of you would have noticed already, but most of GNOME modules have been updated to their 3.26.1 release. This means that Ubuntu 17.10 users will be able to enjoy the latest and greatest from the GNOME project. It’s been fun to follow again the latest development release, report bugs, catch up regressions and following new features.

GNOME 3.26.1 introduces in addition to many bug fixes, improvements, documentation and translation, updates resizeable tiling support, which is a great feature that many people will surely take advantage of! Here is the video that Georges has done and blogged about while developing the feature for those who didn’t have a look yet:

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GNOME: Outreachy and retro-gtk

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GNOME
  • There's One Week Left To Apply For Outreachy Round 15

    There's one week left for women and other under-represented groups in the open-source world to apply for Outreachy Round 15 for a winter internship to work on various projects.

    Outreachy applications are due 23 October and accepted participants are announced in early November for this $5500 USD internship period that runs from December to March. This round is open to: "internationally to women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Internships are also open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, Native American/American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander."

  • retro-gtk: Renaissance

    This is the second article in a small series about retro-gtk, I recommend you to read the first one, retro-gtk: Postmortem, before this one.

    In the previous article I listed some problems I encountered while developing and using retro-gtk; in this one I will present some solutions I implemented to fix them! All that is presented in this article is part of the newly-released retro-gtk 0.13.1, which is the first version of the 0.14 development cycle.

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

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Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

GNOME/GTK: GNOME 3.28, GTK+ 3, GNOME Photos, GNOME.Asia 2017 and Fractional Scaling

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.28 Expected To Ship On Pi Day

    The GNOME team has firmed up the release schedule for the in-development GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

    GNOME 3.28.0 is expected to be released on 14 March 2018, which many in the tech/mathematics community celebrate each year as Pi day.

  • A scrolling primer

    A few years ago, I wrote a post about scrolling in GTK+ 3. Time for another look!

  • Stable GNOME Photos Flatpaks moved to Flathub
  • Going to GNOME.Asia 2017

    To be honest, I’m really exited about this trip. I’ve never been to ChongQing before.

  • How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Gnome

    Fractional scaling is practically necessary if you’re running a HiDPI display, and you want your desktop to scale uniformly to match your display. It’s always been an issue on Linux, but the latest version of the GNOME desktop has implemented a true fractional scaling feature to keep your desktop looking good.

    Even though GNOME 3.26 does have fractional scaling support, it wasn’t mature enough to make the release. As a result, it’s still a testing feature that you need to enable yourself.

Software, KDE, and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • D-Bus Broker Updated To Version 5

    Earlier this year was word of BUS1 working on a D-Bus Broker while announced in late August was this D-Bus Broker project as a high performance message bus.

  • 10 Free Linux Productivity Apps You Haven’t Heard Of

    Productivity apps can really make your work easier. If you are a Linux user, these 10 lesser-known free productivity apps for the Linux desktop can help you.. As a matter of fact, it’s possible keen Linux users have heard of all the apps on the list, but for somebody who hasn’t gone beyond the main apps, these should be unknown.

  • Krita 3.3.1
  • KDE Plasma 5.12 Pushing For "An Awesome Release On Wayland"

    While today's release of KDE Plasma 5.11 brings with it many Wayland improvements, KWin maintainer Martin Flöser (né Gräßlin) is proposing to get the Plasma 5.12 support into better shape on Wayland.

  • GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin

    Last weekend we held a GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin, as planned in August. That means not just a hackfest organised by the foundation, but to improve the foundation itself. Many of the topics we had to cover are interconnected and it’s a challenge to untangle it all and sort it out. Being in the same room, with a projector and a whiteboard, helped a lot. Many thanks to Kinvolk who let us use their

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, Smartwatches, Google, NSA, Microsoft and Flexera FUD

  • WPA2 flaw's worst impact on Android, Linux devices

    The flaw in the WPA2 wireless protocol revealed recently has a critical impact on Android phones running version 6.0 of the mobile operating system and Linux devices, a security researcher says.

  • Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

    But given the millions of routers and other IoT devices that will likely never see a fix, the true cost of Krack could play out for years.

  • 'All wifi networks' are vulnerable to hacking, security expert discovers

    WPA2 protocol used by vast majority of wifi connections has been broken by Belgian researchers, highlighting potential for internet traffic to be exposed

  • Kids' smartwatches can be 'easily' hacked, says watchdog

    Smartwatches bought for children who do not necessarily need them can be hacked [sic], according to a warning out of Norway and its local Consumer Council (NCC).

  • John Lewis pulls children's smartwatch from sale over spying fears

    The Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) revealed that several brands of children’s smartwatch, have such poor security controls that hackers [sic] could easily follow their movements and eavesdrop on conversations.

  • Google's 'Advanced Protection' Locks Down Accounts Like Never Before

    Google hasn't shared the details of what that process entails. But the CDT's Hall, whom Google briefed on the details, says it will include a "cooling-off" period that will lock the account for a period of time while the user proves his or her identity via several other factors. That slowed-down, intensive check is designed to make the account-recovery process a far less appealing backdoor into victims' data.

  • NSA won't say if it knew about KRACK, but don't look to this leaked doc for answers
    Given how involved the NSA has been with remote and local exploitation of networks, systems, devices, and even individuals, many put two and two together and assumed the worst. What compounded the matter was that some were pointing to a 2010-dated top secret NSA document leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, which detailed a hacking tool called BADDECISION, an "802.11 CNE tool" -- essentially an exploit designed to target wireless networks by using a man-in-the-middle attack within range of the network. It then uses a frame injection technique to redirect targets to one of the NSA's own servers, which acts as a "matchmaker" to supply the best malware for the target device to ensure it's compromised for the long-term. The slide said the hacking tool "works for WPA/WPA2," suggesting that BADDECISION could bypass the encryption. Cue the conspiracy theories. No wonder some thought the hacking tool was an early NSA-only version of KRACK.
  • You're doing open source wrong, Microsoft tsk-tsk-tsks at Google: Chrome security fixes made public too early [Ed: Says the company that gives back doors to the NSA and attacks FOSS with patents, lobbying etc.]
  • Why Open Source Security Matters for Healthcare Orgs [Ed: marketing slant for firms that spread FUD]
    Open source software can help healthcare organizations remain flexible as they adopt new IT solutions, but if entities lack open source security measures it can lead to larger cybersecurity issues. A recent survey found that organizations in numerous industries might not be paying enough attention to potential open source risk factors. Half of all code used in commercial and Internet of Things (IoT) software products is open source, but only 37 percent of organizations have an open source acquisition or usage policy, according to a recent Flexera report. More than 400 commercial software suppliers and in-house software development teams were interviewed, with respondent roles including software developers, DevOps, IT, engineering, legal, and security.

Games: JASEM, openage, Riskers, Rise to Ruins, Slime Rancher

The most promising linux distributions in 2017

Linux distributions have already gained recognition of its users and with every year new products appear in the market. Many of them focus on the certain tasks, so you can’t create a single list of the best ones. Here we have chosen several fields of Linux use and those distributions that have all chances to take the initial positions in their niche in 2017. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 Debuts Officially with GNOME 3.26 on Top of Wayland, Linux 4.13 How to: Upgrade Ubuntu 17.04 to Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 ISOs Officially Released 10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Now Available to Download, This Is What’s New How to Enable Night Light on Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark Released With New Features — Download Torrents And ISO Files Here Ubuntu Flavors, Including Ubuntu MATE 17.10, Are Available to Download Ubuntu 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' ditches Unity for Gnome