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GNOME

Cryptography in Ubuntu 16.04 and GTK2 Demotion

Filed under
GNOME
Security
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Announces Certified FIPS 140-2 Cryptographic Packages for Ubuntu 16.04

    Canonical announced on Wednesday the availability of officially certified FIPS 140-2 cryptographic packages for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series through its Cryptographic Module Validation Program.

    Level 1 FIPS 140-2 cryptographic packages can now be purchased for your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system through Canonical's Ubuntu Advantage service or as a separate, standalone product. Ubuntu Advantage subscribers can already find the FIPS-compliant modules in the Ubuntu Advantage private archive if they use Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on their PCs.

  • GTK2 demotion
  • Ubuntu Developers Working Towards The Eventual Demotion Of GTK2

    Not only are Ubuntu developers working towards demoting Python 2 on their Linux distribution but they are also working on being able to demote the GTK2 tool-kit from the main archive to universe followed by its eventual removal in the future.

    Matthias Klose is hoping to organize more work towards this slow demotion process of GTK2 and ideally to get some of the issues cleared up ahead of the Ubuntu 18.04 Long-Term Support release in April.

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now

    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community.

    "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."

  • Interview with Rytelier

    The amount of convenience is very high compared to other programs. The amount of “this one should be designed in a better way, it annoys me” things is the smallest of all the programs I use, and if something is broken, then most of these functions are announced to improve in 4.0.

  • Grow your skills with GNOME

    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.

  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support

    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes.

    Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Best Gnome distro of 2017

Filed under
GNOME

And the winner is …

Well, I’ve never ever believed I’d say this, but being objective and all, it’s an Arch-based distribution that gets the highest accolade in this test – Antergos 17.9! Do mind, it’s not perfect, but it does offer a reasonably rounded experience with some really interesting (and unique) features. Like most small projects, it does suffer from obvious lack of manpower needed to tackle the usability papercuts, but on the other hand, it brings in innovation that is not apparent in other distributions, and it also provides a solid baseline for day-to-day use, without compromising on stability, and without ever disclosing its geeky DNA.

My experience with Antergos 17.9 shows a distribution that is relatively sprightly, focuses on usability, offers excellent driver support, and tries to balance beauty with functionality. It still struggles gluing all these together, but there do not seem to be any fundamental flaws. It also manages to showcase Gnome in a very positive light, which cannot be said of pretty much any other candidate that I’ve had a chance to test this year. If anything, the outcome of 2017 is satisfying in its own right, even though I did struggle and suffer a lot while playing and testing these different distributions. But in one sentence, if you do need a Gnome distro, this is the best that I can offer and recommend. And it wouldn’t be a bad recommendation either. All right, that was two sentences.

Conclusion

Back in December 2016, I said Gnome is slowly recovering. Scratch that. It was a brief flicker of hope, and it’s gone. It would seem the direction has reversed, and the Gnome desktop is becoming less usable. Its overall design remains stubbornly unchanged while the quality and stability are constantly deteriorating.

Still, an odd distro or two manage to rise above the mediocrity and provide a relatively reasonable desktop session, Gnome notwithstanding. For 2017, Antergos is Dedoimedo’s Gnome choice. You get an okay mix of everything, solid performance, a stable behavior, and a few glitches just to keep you on your toes. Most impressive is the graphics stack support, very elegant looks, and tons of great software. If you’ve never considered Arch in its many guises and sacrificial forms, then Antergos seems like a good starting point.

But wait, what if I don’t like Gnome, you asketh? Despair not! In the coming days, we will also look at what Xfce and Plasma have to offer. It shall be most interesting. Stay tuned.

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Also: OSK update

GNOME: Outreachy, World Clocks, UX Hackfest London

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GNOME
  • Outreachy's finally here !

    It’s been a month since the Outreachy Round 15 results were announced . Yay! my proposal for adding a network panel to GNOME Usage was selected. I am glad to be working on something I personally have been longing for. Moreover, I finally have something to cut down on my Xbox addiction and channelize it into bringing the network panel to life.

  • UTC and Anywhere on Earth support

    A quick post to tell you that we finally added UTC support to Clocks' and the Shell's World Clocks section. And if you're into it, there's also Anywhere on Earth support.

    You will need to have git master versions of libgweather (our cities and timezones database), and gnome-clocks. This feature will land in GNOME 3.28.

  • UX Hackfest London

    Last week I took part in the GNOME Shell UX Hackfest in London, along with other designers and developers from GNOME and adjacent communities such as Endless, Pop!, and elementary. We talked about big, fundamental things, like app launching and the lock/login screen, as well as some smaller items, like the first-run experience and legacy window decorations.

GNOME: GNOME Boxes and ColorHug

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GNOME
  • GNOME Boxes Makes It Easier to Test Drive Linux Distros

    The next major release of GNOME Boxes is able to download popular Linux (and BSD-based) operating systems directly inside the app itself.

    Boxes is free, open-source software. It can be used to access both remote and virtual systems as it is built around QEMU, KVM, and libvirt virtualisation technologies.

    For its new ISO-toting integration Boxes makes use of libosinfo, a database of operating systems that also provides details on any virtualized environment requirements.

  • Download and install operating systems directly in GNONE Boxes

    If you are closely following the development of GNOME Boxes, you probably have read Debarshi’s announcement of this new feature that allows you to download and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux gratis directly from Boxes.

  • ColorHug Plus Update

    I’ll update the website at some point this evening, I’m not sure whether to just post all this or remove the ColorHug+ page completely. Perhaps a sad announcement, but perhaps not one that’s too unexpected considering the lack of updates in the last few months. Sorry to disappoint everybody.

Top 20 GNOME Extensions You Should Be Using Right Now

Filed under
GNOME

The capacity of your GNOME desktop can be enhanced with extensions. Here is a list of the best GNOME extensions to save you the trouble of finding them on your own.
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KDE and GNOME: Qt 5.10.0 RC, Evolving KDE, and GNOME at London UX Hackfest

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Qt 5.10 Release Candidate Arrives Late

    Qt 5.10 RC was expected back on 16 November but only this morning is making its debut.

    While arriving nearly two weeks late, The Qt Company is still hoping to get the official Qt 5.10.0 release out on time, which has been scheduled for 30 November. Thus there's basically two days left to get the release candidate tested if getting the release out on time.

  • Qt 5.10.0 RC out

    We are targeting to get final Qt 5.10.0 out 30.11.2017 as planned so please test the packages now & report me immediately if you find something which should really block the release. But remember: We won't block the release without really good reasons. Qt 5.10.1 will be released quite quickly so if we can live with issue as known issue in Qt 5.10.0 we will. So please add those issues directly in known issues page (https://wiki.qt.io/Qt_5.10.0_Known_Issues).

  • Evolving KDE – The goals are set!

    Since Akademy in Almería we have been going through the process of defining goals for KDE for the next 3 to 4 years. Different ideas were proposed and refined. 10 of them made it into the community-wide vote to select 3 of them. Today I am proud to announce the result based on the 684 submitted votes.

  • KDE's Goals For The Next 3~4 Years

    Since this year's KDE Akademy conference, KDE developers have been plotting their vision for the next few years and recently wrapped up voting on what should be their three main goals to focus on over the next few years.

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  • London UX Hackfest

    Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, a handful of designers and developers got together last week in London to refocus on the core element of the GNOME experience, the shell. Allan and Cassidy have already summed up everything in their well written blog posts, so I’d like to point to some pretty pictures and the video above.

Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops.

And now almost exactly six years after Ubuntu first switched from GNOME 2 to the Unity desktop, that has been dropped, too. The distro is back to GNOME, and Canonical recently released Ubuntu 17.10, a major update with some significant changes coming to the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Builder 3.27 Progress

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GNOME

We are a couple of months into Builder’s 3.28 development. We have fewer big ticket features scheduled this cycle when compared to 3.26. However that is replaced by a multitude of smaller features and details. Let’s take a look at some of what has been done already.

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Also: GNOME Builder Development Environment Picking Up Many Features For GNOME 3.28

Recommended GNOME Shell Extensions for Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

This is a list of GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that are very useful for Ubuntu 17.10 users. Among them are NetSpeed (to show up/down speed), Dash to Panel (to combine all panels into single bottom panel), Datetime Format (to show complete day-date-clock at top panel), even EasyScreenCast (to record your desktop activity to video), and more. They are handy for many user's daily/repeating tasks, easy to install, and user-friendly to operate. Finally, I hope this recommendation article is useful for you.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

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