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GNOME

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

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GNOME
  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes

    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes.

    If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!

  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland

    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor.

    Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.

  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD

    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release.

    In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

KDE and GNOME Development: Discover, librsvg, GNOME Photos

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KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Discover

    I guess I’m becoming a Discover developer, since it’s where I seem to spend most of my time these days. It’s just so darn fun since the lead Developer Aleix Pol is super easy to work with, there’s a lot of low-hanging fruit, and with Kirigami, it’s very simple to make consequential changes even when you’re a novice programmer and not very familiar with the codebase. That said, Aleix is still making about 99% of the code changes, and I’m mostly doing UI tweaks, bug screening, promotion, strategy, and work with apps to get their houses in order.

  • Help needed for librsvg 2.42.1

    I have prepared a list of bugs which I'd like to be fixed in the 2.42.1 milestone. Two of them are assigned to myself, as I'm already working on them.

  • GNOME Photos: Happenings

GNOME Devs to Users: Desktop Icons Are Moving to GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.28

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GNOME

There appears to be a lot of fuss lately about the removal of an option from the GNOME desktop environment that allows users to display icons on their desktops.

Long story short, last month, near the Christmas holidays, GNOME developer Carlos Soriano shared his plans on removing a so-called "the desktop" feature from the Nautilus file manager starting with the upcoming GNOME 3.28 release of the desktop environment, proposing its integration into the GNOME Shell component.

The feature is there to handle application icons on the user's workspace, but it shouldn't have been implemented in Nautilus in the first place, according to the developer. So for the GNOME devs to be able to add new features to the Nautilus file manager, they need to remove its ability to handle desktop icons and place the code somewhere else.

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GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

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GNOME
  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI

    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker.

    Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.

  • Musings on bug trackers

    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.

  • ABI stability for GXml

    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml.

    GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

You GNOME it: Windows and Apple devs get a compelling reason to turn to Linux

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Linux
GNOME

Open Source Insider The biggest open source story of 2017 was unquestionably Canonical's decision to stop developing its Unity desktop and move Ubuntu to the GNOME Shell desktop.

What made the story that much more entertaining was how well Canonical pulled off the transition. Ubuntu 17.10 was quite simply one of the best releases of the year and certainly the best release Ubuntu has put out in a good long time. Of course since 17.10 was not an LTS release, the more conservative users – which may well be the majority in Ubuntu's case – still haven't made the transition.

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Solaris 11.4 To Move From GNOME 2 Desktop To GNOME Shell

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OS
GNOME

For those happening to use Oracle Solaris on desktops/workstations, Solaris 11.4 will finally be making the transition from GNOME 2 to the GNOME 3.24 Shell.

GNOME Shell has been the default GNOME user interface since 2011 while with the upcoming Solaris 11.4 update is when Oracle is finally making the plunge from GNOME 2.x to GNOME 3.24. Longtime Sun/Solaris developer Alan Coopersmith confirmed, "Gnome Shell is coming in Solaris 11.4, which upgrades GNOME to version 3.24."

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KDE and GNOME

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KDE
GNOME
  • Qt Cloud Messaging API Available for Embedded Systems

    Challenges with cloud messaging for embedded devices has inspired the Kaltiot & SnowGrains teams to create a cross-platform Qt API which enables easy push messaging from and to embedded devices. The API is called the Qt Cloud Messaging API and it is built with flexibility and extensibility in mind.

    We have decided to target other Qt areas, too, and make the API easily extensible to any service provider instead of being for embedded only. This enables developers to use the same API for both mobile and desktop development.

  • Zanshin 0.5.0 is out: 2018 will be organized!

    We are happy and proud to announce the immediate availability of Zanshin 0.5.0.

    After 0.4.0 one year and a half ago and 0.4.1 last year (which wasn't publicly announced), this new release introduce new features. The 0.4 series was mostly about the Qt 5 port and stabilization, now we can be a bit more ambitious again.

  • GNOME 3.28 Removes Option to Put Icons on the Desktop

    If you’re among the many GNOME Shell users who like to put icons on the desktop, brace yourself for change

    Developers working on the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment have removed the ‘desktop’ feature currently used to display and manage files, folders and attached drives kept on the desktop workspace.

GNOME: GtkSourceView, Friends of GNOME, GIMP, OpenType

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GNOME
  • GtkSourceView fundraising – November/December report

    I prefer to set expectations, I haven’t worked hard on GtkSourceView and Tepl this time around, because the fundraising is not as successful as I would like. Since I’m paid less than one hour per week for that project, I don’t feel forced to work > 10 times more, I think it’s understandable.

  • A (more) random act of kindness

    I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all the people who became Friends of GNOME, whether they chose me or someone else for the postcard, or even if they opted out. Your donation to the GNOME Foundation helps us a lot. And if you’re not already a donor, consider becoming one!

  • New “mypaint-brushes” package

    Since January 1st, GIMP depends on the “mypaint-brushes” repository which I am maintaining until MyPaint project finally takes it alongside its other repositories.

    I am hoping that I won’t have to maintain this for long and am looking forward for the MyPaint developers to take care of it (and last I heard of it, in the bug report, they wanted to). So this blog post is also to say that I am not trying to fork MyPaint or anything. I am just taking a little advance because we cannot wait much longer unfortunately since GIMP now uses libmypaint and we are really looking into releasing GIMP 2.10 as soon as we can.

  • More fun with fonts

    As you may remember from my last post on fonts, our goal was to support OpenType font variations. The Linux text rendering stack has multiple components: freetype, fontconfig, harfbuzz, cairo, pango. Achieving our goal required a number of features and fixes in all these components.

    Getting all the required changes in place is a bit time-consuming, but the results are finally starting to come together. If you use the master branches of freetype, fontconfig, harfbuzz, cairo, pango and GTK+, you can try this out today.

BuildStream 1.0 and Flashrom 1.0

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OSS
GNOME

KDE and GNOME: Qt 6.0, Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging, Richer Shadows, Endless and GTK+

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KDE
GNOME
  • With Qt 6.0 Development To Heat Up, 2018 Should Be Exciting For Qt

    Qt 6.0 planning has begun and we should be hearing more about this next major tool-kit update as the year goes on. Here's some of what we can expect from Qt in the near future.

  • Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging

    FreeBSD is getting more serious about license metadata in the packages produced by the project — that is, the binary distribution of software produced from licensed source code. A lot of software in FreeBSD “proper” is (naturally) BSD-licensed, and a lot of Free Software packaged by FreeBSD is (also naturally) GPL licensed. But the different licenses carry different obligations, so it’s good to keep track of the exact licensing applied to each bit of software.

  • Richer Shadows

    We decided to make them larger and deeper by default, and center them horizontally so that there’s a shadow on the left edges of windows and menus as well. I was honored to produce the patch, and I’m happy to report that it’s been accepted and merged! Starting in Plasma 5.12, here’s how shadows will look...

  • Have a great 2018!

    Workwise, it’s been another very busy year at Endless. I am still in charge of the App Center (our GNOME Software fork) and doing what I can to tame this beast. Endless’ mission has always been a noble one, but with the current direction of the world it’s even more significant and needed; so I will continue to give my best and hope we can keep making a difference in less fortunate regions.

  • GTK+ Custom Widgets: General Definitions

    Writing a GTK+ custom widget with is Vala easy. First all create an XML definition with a top level container widget and a set of child ones. You can use Glade to do so. This is not a tutorial for Glade, so let start at with an already designed template UI file.

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