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GNOME

10 Great Linux GTK Themes For 2018

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GNOME

Customization is a big part of the Linux experience, and your desktop theme is no exception. The world of Linux desktop themes is an ever-evolving one, with new ones replacing old favorites all the time. Of course, the desktop environments and GTK itself are always changing, so that adds another dynamic element to consider. That said, some of the best desktop customization happens on the simplest desktop environments, like XFCE.

As of now, in early 2018, there are some really excellent GTK themes available. These themes aren’t ranked in any particular order. That comes down to a matter or preference. Any one of them can add a whole new look to your GTK-based desktop.

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GNOME: Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04, Bug Fix for Memory Leak

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GNOME
  • Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04 [Quick Tip]

    Ubuntu 18.04 uses a customized version of GNOME and GNOME users might not like those changes. This tutorial shows you how to install vanilla GNOME on Ubuntu 18.04.

    One of the main new features of Ubuntu 18.04 is the customized GNOME desktop. Ubuntu has done some tweaking on GNOME desktop to make it look similar to its Unity desktop.

    So you get minimize options in the windows control, a Unity like launcher on the left of the screen, app indicator support among some other changes.

  • The Infamous GNOME Shell Memory Leak

    at this point, I think it’s safe to assume that many of you already heard of a memory leak that was plaguing GNOME Shell. Well, as of yesterday, the two GitLab’s MRs that help fixing that issue were merged, and will be available in the next GNOME version. The fixes are being considered for backporting to GNOME 3.28 – after making sure they work as expected and don’t break your computer.

  • The Big GNOME Shell Memory Leak Has Been Plugged, Might Be Backported To 3.28

    The widely talked about "GNOME Shell memory leak" causing excessive memory usage after a while with recent versions of GNOME has now been fully corrected. The changes are currently staged in Git for what will become GNOME 3.30 but might also be backported to 3.28.

    Well known GNOME developer Georges Stavracas has provided an update on the matter and confirmed that the issue stems from GJS - the GNOME JavaScript component - with the garbage collection process not being fired off as it should.

Canonical Needs Your Help to Test GNOME Memory Leak Patches in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment release contained a major memory leak in the GNOME Shell user interface component, but it was quickly addressed so that it won't affect users considering the fact that most Linux OSes distribute the latest GNOME desktop packages once the first point release is available, in this case GNOME 3.28.1.

As Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is shipping with the latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment by default, it was apparent that it will include all the upstream patches released by the GNOME Project to address any memory leaks. Canonical already successfully tested the new patches, but it needs to get wider testing and feedback as soon as possible before the final release on April 26.

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GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Development Officially Kicks Off

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GNOME

GNOME 3.29.1 is the first development snapshot of the forthcoming GNOME 3.30 desktop environment, which is dubbed "Almeria" after the host city of the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2018 event later this year, and it brings a few updated core components and apps, but without any significant changes.

"There are actually not very many changes to GNOME modules themselves, because not many maintainers provided updated tarballs, but there are new versions for a few applications and libraries," said Michael Catanzaro on behalf of the GNOME Release Team. "Notably, GNOME Shell was not updated in this release, which is a bit sad."

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GNOME 3.28 Release Party and GNOME 3.30 in September

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GNOME

Integrate Your Android Phone With Gnome Shell Without KDE Dependencies With GSConnect

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Android
GNOME

While GSConnect is available as a Gnome Shell extension, it also provides integration with Nautilus (Files), Google Chrome and Firefox. Using the browser extension, you can easily share links with devices connected to GSConnect, either directly, to the device browser, or by SMS.

As for GSConnect Android integration features, they are pretty much identical to those available with the original KDE Connect application, like.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: Fedora Atomic Workstation, Tobias Bernard, GNOME 3.28.1 and GTK3 in LibreOffice

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GNOME
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Developer tools

    A while ago, I wrote about using GNOME Builder for GTK+ work on my Fedora Atomic Workstation. I’ve done this with some success since then. I am using the nightly builds of GNOME Builder from the sdk.gnome.org flatpak repository, since I like to try the latest improvements.

  • Tobias Bernard: Joining Purism

    I’m very happy to announce that I’ve joined Purism. It’s awesome to be working for a company that not only cares about software freedom, but also has Ethical Design as a core principle. My role there is UI/UX designer on the Librem 5, a phone built from the ground up to run free software and GNU/Linux.

  • Purism Hires GNOME Developer For Librem 5 UI/UX Designer

    Purism's latest hire to work on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux smartphone effort is a UI/UX designer who has long been involved with GNOME.

    GNOME interaction designer Tobias Bernard is joining Purism as a UI/UX designer for the Librem 5 smartphone. This German free software advocate believes the Librem 5 has more potential than Ubuntu Touch or Firefox OS due to its freedom and privacy focus and using a full GNU/Linux stack rather than mixing with Android drivers.

  • Bassel Khartabil Free Fellowship, GNOME 3.28.1 Release, New Version of Mixxx and More

    GNOME 3.28 is ready for prime time after receiving its first point release on Friday, which includes numerous improvements and bug fixes. See the announcement for all the details on version 3.28.1.

  • Some Native GTK Dialogs in LibreOffice

    When the GTK3 backend is active in current LibreOffice master (towards 6.1) some of the dialogs are now comprised of fully native GTK dialogs and widgetery. Instead of VCL widgetery themed to look like GTK, they're the real thing.

More on GNOME 3.28.1

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GNOME
  • First GNOME 3.28 Point Release Is Now Rolling Out

    Developers have issued the first point release to GNOME 3.28, which was released last month.

    GNOME 3.28.1 brings a boat load of bug fixes for a stack of GNOME desktop components, modules and apps.

    And, because I know you’ll want ask, the answer is no: a fix for the big GNOME memory leak issue is not part of this update (though work is taking place to address it, so don’t panic).

  • GNOME 3.28.1 released

    Here comes our first update to GNOME 3.28, with many bug fixes,
    improvements, documentation and translation updates.

A Privacy & Security Concern Regarding GNOME Software

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GNOME
Security

GNOME Software is the default application in the GNOME desktop environment to manage software. It also allows you to receive firmware updates through an underlaying daemon called “fwupd“, which is based on an platform called “LVFS“.

In order to understand the relationship in a clearer way, you can think of LVFS as the online platform where hardware vendors come and upload new versions of their firmware which will be later available to download via fwupd. GNOME Software utilizes the fwupd daemon in order to download and install these updates. fwupd is a dependency for GNOME Software.

The whole ecosystem is developed mainly by Richard Hughes, who is working currently for Red Hat, and who’s also the original creator of PackageKit. But it’s worthy to mention that Red Hat doesn’t develop/manage the project directly, but rather, contributes to it with financial & logistic support.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: Google Maps, GTK3 and Compilers

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Development
GNOME
  • Avoid Google Maps with GNOME Maps on GNU/Linux

    So, it’s not really any secret nowadays, that Google saves pretty well anything you ever do using their services. It’s also no secret nowadays, that many people try and avoid using Google services, and would prefer to use alternatives to many of their popular tools, such as Google Maps.

    Sometimes, alternatives are available that provide similar functionality, Startpage for search or another email provider for your email needs. As far as Google Maps is concerned, it is a great product but there are alternatives available online and locally.

    GNU/Linux users have the handy GNOME Maps application at their disposal.

  • A font update

    At the end of march I spent a few days with the Inkscape team, who were so nice to come to the Red Hat Boston office for their hackfest. We discussed many things, from the GTK3 port of Inkscape, to SVG and CSS, but we also spent some time on one of my favorite topics: fonts.

  • Compiler complexities

    The other day I found myself perusing through some disassembly to get an idea of the code’s complexity. I do that occasionally because I find it the quickest way to determine if something is out of whack.

    While I was there, I noticed a rather long _get_type() function. It looked a bit long and more importantly, I only saw one exit point (retq instruction on x86_64).

  • More compiler fun

    Basically, the workaround I had at the time was to just disable -fstack-protector for the get_type() functions. It certainly made things faster, but it was a compromise. The get_type() functions can have user-provided code inserted into them via macros like G_DEFINE_TYPE_EXTENDED() and friends.

    A real solution should manage to return the performance of the hot-path back to pre-stack-protector performance without sacrificing the the protection gained by using it.

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