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GNOME

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

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GNOME
  • Flatpak in detail, part 2

    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.

  • Flatpak – a history

    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.

  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources

    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background.

    The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files.

    The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

KDE and GNOME: File Picker, Flatpaks and Epiphany 3.29

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KDE
LibO
GNOME
  • LibreOffice Picks Up A Native "KDE 5" File Picker

    Several months back LibreOffice developers began working on better integration with KDE Plasma 5 and that has advanced again today with now having a native file picker.

  • Going In-Depth With Flatpak For Sandboxed Application Packaging

    Red Hat / GNOME developer veteran Matthias Clasen has recently begun a series of blog posts going in-depth with Flatpaks for those wondering how this application deployment technology is taking over the Linux desktop.

    Last week Clasen penned the initial piece for explaining bundles, runtimes, and extensions in the Flatpak realm.

  • Epiphany 3.29.3 Picks Up A Reader Mode, Finally Disables NPAPI Plugins

    Epiphany 3.29.3 is now available as the latest version of this GNOME Web Browser.

    Being in the middle of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle, the Epiphany 3.29.3 release is made up of many changes. First up, Epiphany now has an experimental reader mode that is inspired by Mozilla's Firefox reader mode. When viewing page sources in Epiphany, it will also now display within the web browser itself rather than the text editor.

Gnome 3.28 review - Minimalism gone wrong

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GNOME
Reviews

Gnome 3.28 brings in a few interesting changes to the Gnome table - not too many, though, this version isn't a radical revamp, more sort of a gradual progression of the basic idea behind the Gnome desktop environment. Not bad in that regard. Bad in every other regard.

Unfortunately - and this is nothing personal, all I care for is to be happy and productive with my desktops, and Gnome 2 was my favorite thing for years and years - Gnome 3.28 is a sterile, counterproductive pseudo-touch concept that serves little purpose on the desktop. It requires significant tweaking and immense changes under the hood to make presentable and usable, and even then, it works hard against the user. Performance is really bad, a decade-old laptop with anything other than Gnome works better than a contemporary model with Gnome, and you feel the sluggishness with every little thing you do. It's life-sapping. The more you multi-task the worse it gets.

All in all, Gnome 3.28 has changed little from the original Gnome 3 a few years ago. It is still not suited for purpose, it has not evolved in any way, and in fact, there are fresh new functional regressions in the product. It's getting more and more difficult to achieve simple things, and you're fighting against the desktop. Not how it's meant to be. Maybe Linux will make it big on the phone and tablet one day, and then Gnome could be a blast. But on traditional computing devices, it's a flop. Not recommended, I'm afraid. Take care.

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Flatpak in detail

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Red Hat
GNOME

At this point, Flatpak is a mature system for deploying and running desktop applications. It has accumulated quite some sophistication over time, which can make it appear more complicated than it is.

In this post, I’ll try to look in depth at some of the core concepts behind Flatpak, namely runtimes and extensions.

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The sad state of KDE Discover and GNOME Software on openSUSE Leap 15

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KDE
GNOME
SUSE

Software centers have become very important. Linux was the first place where you could install and update all software in one place, by using package managers. In openSUSE that central place is the YaST Software Manager. Other distributions, such as Ubuntu, used applications like the Synaptic package manager. The user experience of these package managers is not very user friendly, as they show many technical packages / details, which most users will not understand.

In 2008, Apple introduced the iOS App Store. This changed the public perception on how software centers should work. Everything was now in one place, neatly organized into categories. The screenshots, descriptions and ratings made it easy to learn about new software. And installation was a breeze. Google followed this trend by announcing Android Market later in 2008. Apple introduced the App Store for Mac OSX in 2010. Google re-branded the Android Market in 2012 to Google Play store. And in the same year, Microsoft introduced the Windows Store for Windows 8. This store was re-branded in 2017 to the Microsoft Store.

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Tagcloud

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GNOME

There is ongoing work on content-specific user interfaces that can work with Tracker to access local content, so for photos for example you can use GNOME Photos to view and organize your whole photo collection. However, there isn’t a content-agnostic tool available that might let you view and organize all the content on your computer… other than Nautilus which is limited to files and folders.

I’m interested in organizing content using tags, which are nothing but freeform textual category labels. On the web, tags are a very common way of categorizing content. (The name hashtags is probably more widely understood than tags among web users, but hashtag has connotations to social media and sharing which don’t necessarily apply when talking about desktop content so I will call them tags here.) Despite the popularity on the web, desktop support is low: Tagspaces seems to be the only option and the free edition is very limited in what it can do. Within GNOME, we have had support for storing tags in the Tracker database for many years but I don’t know of any applications that allow viewing or editing file tags.

Around the time of GUADEC 2017 I read Alexandru’s blog post about tags in Nautilus, in which he announced that Nautilus wasn’t going to get support for organizing files using tags because it would conflict to much with the existing organization principle in Nautilus of putting files into folders. I agree with that logic there, but it leaves open a question: when will GNOME get an interface that allows me to organize files using tags?

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How to Use GNOME Shell’s Secret Screen Recorder

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GNOME
HowTos

So you want to record your Ubuntu desktop, but you don’t know which desktop screen recorder to use?

Well, have you considered not using one at all?

Don’t look at me strangely: I promise this makes sense.

You’ve likely seen videos on YouTube where people share a screencast of their Linux desktops. Perhaps you want to join the fun. Well, you can, and you don’t need any special tools or separate screen recorder apps to do it.

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GSoC Work on KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • GSoC’18 Week 2 && 3

    Thanks to Timothée Giet, for providing me the icons of different tools. We’ll be updating the remaining icons soon.

    We noticed some bugs with the default color picker, and decided to create our own Color picker, consisting of three bars –> Hue, Saturation and lightness to select the required color. This was a little difficult task for me at the beginning but finally managed to create this with the help of my mentors and resources on the internet.

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  • Improving the reliability and usability of KStars

    The goal of my GSOC project to continue the improvements over the codebase what was started previous year. Improving the reliability and bring modern C++ features. I have the following goals for the first period to make KStars better:

  • GSoC 2018: Filter Infrastructure

    This summer I’m working on librsvg, a GNOME library for rendering SVG files, particularly on porting the SVG filter effects from C to Rust. That involves separating the code for different filters from one huge C file into individual files for each filter, and then porting the filter rendering infrastructure and the individual filters.

    Thankfully, in the large C file the code for different filters was divided by comment blocks, so several vim macros later I was done with the not so exciting splitting part.

3rd Party Software in Fedora Workstation

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

So you have probably noticed by now that we started offering some 3rd party software in the latest Fedora Workstation namely Google Chrome, Steam, NVidia driver and PyCharm. This has come about due to a long discussion in the Fedora community on how we position Fedora Workstation and how we can improve our user experience. The principles we base of this policy you can read up on in this policy document. To sum it up though the idea is that while the Fedora operating system you install will continue as it has been for the last decade to be based on only free software (with an exception for firmware) you will be able to more easily find and install the plethora of applications out there through our software store application, GNOME Software. We also expect that as the world of Linux software moves towards containers in general and Flatpaks specifically we will have an increasing number of these 3rd party applications available in Fedora.

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

Filed under
Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

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