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KDE and GNOME: KDE4, Krita and GNOME.Asia

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Everything old is new again

    Just because KDE4-era software has been deprecated by the KDE-FreeBSD team in the official ports-repository, doesn’t mean we don’t care for it while we still need to. KDE4 was released on January 11th, 2008 — I still have the T-shirt — which was a very different C++ world than what we now live in. Much of the code pre-dates the availability of C++11 — certainly the availability of compilers with C++11 support. The language has changed a great deal in those ten years since the original release.

    The platforms we run KDE code on have, too — FreeBSD 12 is a long way from the FreeBSD 6 or 7 that were current at release (although at the time, I was more into OpenSolaris). In particular, since then the FreeBSD world has switched over to Clang, and FreeBSD current is experimenting with Clang 7. So we’re seeing KDE4-era code being built, and running, on FreeBSD 12 with Clang 7. That’s a platform with a very different idea of what constitutes correct code, than what the code was originally written for. (Not quite as big a difference as Helio’s KDE1 efforts, though)

  • Let’s take this bug, for example…

    Krita’s 2018 fund raiser is all about fixing bugs! And we’re fixing bugs already. So, let’s take a non-technical look at a bug Dmitry fixed yesterday. This is the bug: “key sequence ctrl+w ambiguous with photoshop compatible bindings set” And this is the fix.

  • GNOME.Asia 2018

    GNOME.Asia 2018 was co-hosted with COSCUP and openSUSE Asia this year in Taipei, Taiwan. It was a good success and I enjoyed it a lot. Besides, meeting old friends and making new ones are always great.

GNU/Linux Desktop Themes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost

    Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost
    Another theme pack with icons for your Linux Desktop. Plane theme is designed to make desktop more elegant and simple, it goes very well along with its own icon pack. Now a days many themes are under development for Gnome and Plane is one of them, it is constantly updating since 2017, fixing and making theme look better. It has some parts from Arc and Adwaita themes, also some other themes inspired author to make Plane more eye catching.
    There are two versions in this theme: light version and dark version which gives comfort to your eyes. This pack includes Gnome shell themes as well, which lets you match your Gnome shell with your Gtk theme.
    Primarily, this pack targets Gnome Shell desktop but can be used on other desktops as well such as: Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate etc. Icons are designed to use with this theme pack but if you want then you can use them with any theme of your choice. Themes are available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04 and Linux Mint 19 via our PPA. Icons available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04/16.04/14.04/Linux Mint 19/18/17. If you find any kind of bug or problem with this theme pack then report it to author and it will get fixed in the next update.

  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

Behind the GNOME 3.30 Release Video

Filed under
GNOME

With each video I experiment with new workflows. Traditionally I have been involved in every step of the production apart from the voice-over with very few opportunities for others to step in and contribute. With Gitlab’s powerful issue tracking system, this no longer needs to be the case. This has meant that I can spend more time on production in Blender and spread out the other aspects of production to the GNOME community.

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NetworkManager 1.14 Officially Released With A Lot Of Networking Goodies

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Following the release candidate last week, NetworkManager 1.14 is now officially available as the latest feature release to this widely-used Linux networking software component.

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Former Compiz Developer Creating New Window Animation Library

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Sam Spilsbury who was the former Compiz lead developer at Canonical and involved in the Unity desktop shell development is creating a new library spun out of Compiz.

Since leaving Canonical six years, he's spent a good portion of that time since working for Endless Computer on their GNOME Shell driven Linux desktop environment. Initially he wrote a "libwobbly" library at Endless for implementing support for "wobbly windows" and other animation logic spun out of the former Compiz code.

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Original: libanimation for everyone

GNOME: Google Code-in and Canta Theme

Filed under
GNOME
  • Google Code-in 2018 and Wikimedia: Mentors and smaller tasks wanted!

    Google Code-in will take place again soon (from October 23 to December 13). GCI is an annual contest for 13-17 year old students to start contributing to free and open projects. It is not only about coding: We also need tasks about design, documentation, outreach/research, and quality assurance. And you can mentor them!

  • Give Your Ubuntu a Fresh Look Using Canta Theme and Icons

    We have seen some cool themes earlier, like Paper, Arc themes which comes with Dark and light version. However none of them having the Green as base color.

    Canta theme is a Green color based GTK theme which is available for GTK 2 and GTK 3 based desktop environments. You can install in in latest Ubuntu GNOME Shell along with all distributions which supports GTK 2 and 3.

    This theme comes with 11 variants classifying in base, light, dark, round, square and compact version for each.

KDE and GNOME: Elisa, Krita, Five or More and Canta

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • 0.3 Beta Release of Elisa Music Player

    This feature improves two different cases. The first is to allow usage of Elisa with a small window. In this case, only minimal information is shown in a possibly small window. The second is to implement the “party” mode that was originally designed by Andrew Lake.

  • KDE Bugsquad – Kickoff with Krita! – Part 1 on September 15th, 2018

    More long and thoughtful posts like the prior one will be coming. But right now I have an important announcement! I have resurrected the KDE Bugsquad, and we have our first official Bug Day on Saturday!

    The KDE Bugsquad is back! We can think of no better way to celebrate than joining forces with the Krita team as part of their Squash All the Bugs fundraiser!

  • Introducing Digital Atelier: a painterly brush preset pack by Ramon Miranda with tutorial videos!

    Over the past months, Ramon Miranda, known for his wonderful introduction to digital painting, Muses, has worked on creating a complete new brush preset bundle: Digital Atelier. Not only does this contain over fifty new brush presets, more than thirty new brush tips and twenty patterns and surfaces.

  • Five or More GSoC
  • Canta: Best Theme And Icons Pack Around For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    If you are a person who changes themes on your Linux system frequently then you are on the right page. Today, we present you best theme under development so far for Ubuntu 18.04/Linux Mint 19, it has variants in light and dark with different styles: normal, compact and square. If you are a fan of material design or not, most probably you are going to like this theme and icons pack. The initial release of Canta was back in March, 2018 and released under GNU General Public License V3. Canta theme is based on Materia Gtk theme.

GNOME Podcasts – podcast client for the GNOME desktop

Filed under
GNOME

Podcasts are shows, similar to radio or TV shows, that are produced by professionals or amateurs and made available on the internet to stream and/or download. They are a popular source of entertainment. There’s lots of great podcasts that are Linux-centric, which I surveyed in this review.

It’s true that any music player worth its salt plays podcasts. But there’s still a call for dedicated players. I’ve looked at podcasts built with web technologies as well as an interesting command-line podcast player. To add to the mix, let’s consider a further podcast player designed with the GNOME desktop in mind.

The application is called GNOME Podcasts, a native GTK app. Its design is inspired by GNOME Music and Vocal. You don’t need a PhD to realize GNOME Podcasts is a podcast client. It used to be called Hammond, after Allan Moore’s character Evey Hammond from the graphic novel V for Vendetta.

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GNOME: Nautilus Terminal 3, GNOME.Asia Summit 2018 and Gtranslator Resurrection

Filed under
GNOME
  • Get A Terminal Embedded In Nautilus File Manager With Nautilus Terminal 3

    Nautilus Terminal 3 embeds a terminal into Nautilus (Files, the default Gnome browser), similar to KDE's Dolphin file manager. The terminal automatically changes directories based on the user's navigation in the file browser.

    This Nautilus extension is a re-implementation of the old Nautilus Terminal that was initially only available for Nautilus 2.x, and later 3.0 and 3.2, which should work with recent Nautilus versions.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2018

    Last year I’d been COSCUP 2017 at first time, it gave a great impression of COSCUP. It’s open, freedom and very energetic. It’s very nice this year GNOME.Asia Summit joint with COSCUP and openSUSE.Asia.

    [...]

    And at night we had a GNOME.Asia BoF to review the Good vs. Bad, we collected a lot of ideas to make the GNOME.Asia better in future.

    In the second day, I made a topic about “flatpak vs. snap”, introduced some concepts and basic usages. And I also listened Max’s “Community experience”, Kukuh’s “GNOME Recipes”, Shobha’s “Humanitarian FOSS projects” and Wen’s “GNOME.Asia experience”.

  • Gtranslator Resurrection

    The last week I received a telegram message about Gtranslator, that was unmaintained for a long time. GNOME translators uses different tools to translate .po files, Gtranslator is a tool for translator that is integrated with the GNOME desktop, but with the time, Gtranslator is getting old and there are several known bugs that never get fixed.

    So I decided to go ahead and become the maintainer of Gtranslator with the main idea of update the interface and fix mayor bugs.

GNOME 3.32 Scheduled to be Released Early Next Year with Expected Wayland Improvements and UI and UX-related changes

Filed under
GNOME

The 35th stable update for the free and open-sourced GNOME 3.30 desktop environment was released on 5th September, as announced by Gnome News. The release came just after the six months of the release of GNOME 3.28. GNOME 3.30 offered introduction of some major latest features, new applications and included small improvements here and there. All of these features were aimed at helping improve the way users use their desktop. Some of the main features in GNOME 3.30 included a faster GNOME Shell Desktop, new look to GNOME file manager Nautilus, a new desktop app known as Podcasts, automatic Flatpak Updates and a new ‘reader mode’ feature.

Now it looks like development at GNOME is not going to stop any time soon as the release schedule for GNOME 3.32 has already been announced by GNOME Wiki. According to this release news, GNOME 3.32 is set to be released on Wednesday, 13th March 2019. The news stated, “GNOME 3.31.x is an unstable development series intended for testing and hacking purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development status, so this unstable 3.31.x series will become the official 3.32 stable release.”

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Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Has More Than 2000 Hacking Tools

The BlackArch Linux penetration testing and ethical hacking computer operating system now has more than 2000 tools in its repositories, announced the project's developers recently. Used by thousands of hundreds of hackers and security researchers all over the world, BlackArch Linux is one of the most acclaimed Linux-based operating systems for hacking and other security-related tasks. It has its own software repositories that contain thousands of tools. The OS is based on the famous Arch Linux operating system and follows a rolling release model, where users install once and receive updates forever, or at least until they do something that can't be repaired and need to reinstall. Read more

Debian Patches for Intel's Defects, Canonical to Fix Ubuntu Security Flaws for a Fee

  • Debian Outs Updated Intel Microcode to Mitigate Spectre V4 and V3a on More CPUs
    The Debian Project released an updated Intel microcode firmware for users of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series to mitigate two of the latest Spectre vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs. Last month, on August 16, Debian's Moritz Muehlenhoff announced the availability of an Intel microcode update that provided Speculative Store Bypass Disable (SSBD) support needed to address both the Spectre Variant 4 and Spectre Variant 3a security vulnerabilities. However, the Intel microcode update released last month was available only for some types of Intel CPUs, so now the Debian Project released an updated version that implements SSBD support for additional Intel CPU models to mitigate both Spectre V4 and V3a on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" systems.
  • Announcing Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – “Trusty Tahr” [Ed: Canonical looking to profit from security flaws in Ubuntu like Microsoft does in Windows.]
    Ubuntu is the basis for the majority of cloud-based workloads today. With over 450 million public cloud instances launched since the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, a number that keeps accelerating on a day-per-day basis since, many of the largest web-scale deployments are using Ubuntu. This includes financial, big data, media, and many other workloads and use cases, which rely on the stability and continuity of the underlying operating system to provide the mission-critical service their customers rely on. Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) was introduced for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS as a way to extend the availability of critical and important security patches beyond the nominal End of Life date of Ubuntu 12.04. Organisations use ESM to address security compliance concerns while they manage the upgrade process to newer versions of Ubuntu under full support. The ability to plan application upgrades in a failsafe environment continues to be cited as the main value for adoption of ESM. With the End of Life of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in April 2019, and to support the planning efforts of developers worldwide, Canonical is announcing the availability of ESM for Ubuntu 14.04.
  • Canonical Announces Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Extended Security Maintenance
    Canonical announced today that it would extend its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering to the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series starting May 2019. Last year on April 28, 2017, when the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series reached end of life, Canonical announced a new way for corporate users and enterprises to receive security updates if they wanted to keep their current Ubuntu 12.04 LTS installations and had no plans to upgrade to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) release. The offering was called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and had a great success among businesses.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • Initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks
    This article is going to be short and sweet as just receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti yesterday and then not receiving the Linux driver build until earlier today... The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti has been busy now for a few hours with the Phoronix Test Suite on the Core i7 8086K system running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the latest drivers.
  • NVIDIA Introduces A Number Of New OpenGL Extensions For Turing
    As part of the GeForce RTX 2080 series launching with the new GPU architecture, NVIDIA has published a number of new OpenGL extensions for making use of some of Turing's new capabilities.
  • Vulkan 1.1.85 Released With Raytracing, Mesh Shaders & Other New NVIDIA Extensions
    Leading up to the Turing launch we weren't sure if NVIDIA was going to deliver same-day Vulkan support for RTX/ray-tracing with the GeForce RTX graphics cards or if it was going to be left up to Direct3D 12 on Windows for a while... Fortunately, as already reported, their new driver has Vulkan RTX support. Additionally, the NVX_raytracing extension and other NVIDIA updates made it into today's Vulkan 1.1.85 release.
  • Radeon/GPUOpen OCAT 1.2 Released But No Linux Support Yet
    A new feature release is out for the Radeon/GPUOpen "OCAT" open-source capture and analytics tool. OCAT 1.2 is their first release of the year and includes VR head-mounted display (HMD) support, new visualization tools, system information detection, new settings, and other enhancements.