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GNOME

GNOME Development and Events

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GNOME
  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0

    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work.

    However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.

  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar

    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.

  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await

    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.

  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)

    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!

  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid

    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros

    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30.

    Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes:

    - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

10 Great Linux GTK Themes For 2018

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GNOME

Customization is a big part of the Linux experience, and your desktop theme is no exception. The world of Linux desktop themes is an ever-evolving one, with new ones replacing old favorites all the time. Of course, the desktop environments and GTK itself are always changing, so that adds another dynamic element to consider. That said, some of the best desktop customization happens on the simplest desktop environments, like XFCE.

As of now, in early 2018, there are some really excellent GTK themes available. These themes aren’t ranked in any particular order. That comes down to a matter or preference. Any one of them can add a whole new look to your GTK-based desktop.

Read more

GNOME: Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04, Bug Fix for Memory Leak

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GNOME
  • Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04 [Quick Tip]

    Ubuntu 18.04 uses a customized version of GNOME and GNOME users might not like those changes. This tutorial shows you how to install vanilla GNOME on Ubuntu 18.04.

    One of the main new features of Ubuntu 18.04 is the customized GNOME desktop. Ubuntu has done some tweaking on GNOME desktop to make it look similar to its Unity desktop.

    So you get minimize options in the windows control, a Unity like launcher on the left of the screen, app indicator support among some other changes.

  • The Infamous GNOME Shell Memory Leak

    at this point, I think it’s safe to assume that many of you already heard of a memory leak that was plaguing GNOME Shell. Well, as of yesterday, the two GitLab’s MRs that help fixing that issue were merged, and will be available in the next GNOME version. The fixes are being considered for backporting to GNOME 3.28 – after making sure they work as expected and don’t break your computer.

  • The Big GNOME Shell Memory Leak Has Been Plugged, Might Be Backported To 3.28

    The widely talked about "GNOME Shell memory leak" causing excessive memory usage after a while with recent versions of GNOME has now been fully corrected. The changes are currently staged in Git for what will become GNOME 3.30 but might also be backported to 3.28.

    Well known GNOME developer Georges Stavracas has provided an update on the matter and confirmed that the issue stems from GJS - the GNOME JavaScript component - with the garbage collection process not being fired off as it should.

Canonical Needs Your Help to Test GNOME Memory Leak Patches in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment release contained a major memory leak in the GNOME Shell user interface component, but it was quickly addressed so that it won't affect users considering the fact that most Linux OSes distribute the latest GNOME desktop packages once the first point release is available, in this case GNOME 3.28.1.

As Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is shipping with the latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment by default, it was apparent that it will include all the upstream patches released by the GNOME Project to address any memory leaks. Canonical already successfully tested the new patches, but it needs to get wider testing and feedback as soon as possible before the final release on April 26.

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GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Development Officially Kicks Off

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GNOME

GNOME 3.29.1 is the first development snapshot of the forthcoming GNOME 3.30 desktop environment, which is dubbed "Almeria" after the host city of the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2018 event later this year, and it brings a few updated core components and apps, but without any significant changes.

"There are actually not very many changes to GNOME modules themselves, because not many maintainers provided updated tarballs, but there are new versions for a few applications and libraries," said Michael Catanzaro on behalf of the GNOME Release Team. "Notably, GNOME Shell was not updated in this release, which is a bit sad."

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GNOME 3.28 Release Party and GNOME 3.30 in September

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GNOME

Integrate Your Android Phone With Gnome Shell Without KDE Dependencies With GSConnect

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Android
GNOME

While GSConnect is available as a Gnome Shell extension, it also provides integration with Nautilus (Files), Google Chrome and Firefox. Using the browser extension, you can easily share links with devices connected to GSConnect, either directly, to the device browser, or by SMS.

As for GSConnect Android integration features, they are pretty much identical to those available with the original KDE Connect application, like.

Read more

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Fedora Atomic Workstation, Tobias Bernard, GNOME 3.28.1 and GTK3 in LibreOffice

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GNOME
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Developer tools

    A while ago, I wrote about using GNOME Builder for GTK+ work on my Fedora Atomic Workstation. I’ve done this with some success since then. I am using the nightly builds of GNOME Builder from the sdk.gnome.org flatpak repository, since I like to try the latest improvements.

  • Tobias Bernard: Joining Purism

    I’m very happy to announce that I’ve joined Purism. It’s awesome to be working for a company that not only cares about software freedom, but also has Ethical Design as a core principle. My role there is UI/UX designer on the Librem 5, a phone built from the ground up to run free software and GNU/Linux.

  • Purism Hires GNOME Developer For Librem 5 UI/UX Designer

    Purism's latest hire to work on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux smartphone effort is a UI/UX designer who has long been involved with GNOME.

    GNOME interaction designer Tobias Bernard is joining Purism as a UI/UX designer for the Librem 5 smartphone. This German free software advocate believes the Librem 5 has more potential than Ubuntu Touch or Firefox OS due to its freedom and privacy focus and using a full GNU/Linux stack rather than mixing with Android drivers.

  • Bassel Khartabil Free Fellowship, GNOME 3.28.1 Release, New Version of Mixxx and More

    GNOME 3.28 is ready for prime time after receiving its first point release on Friday, which includes numerous improvements and bug fixes. See the announcement for all the details on version 3.28.1.

  • Some Native GTK Dialogs in LibreOffice

    When the GTK3 backend is active in current LibreOffice master (towards 6.1) some of the dialogs are now comprised of fully native GTK dialogs and widgetery. Instead of VCL widgetery themed to look like GTK, they're the real thing.

More on GNOME 3.28.1

Filed under
GNOME
  • First GNOME 3.28 Point Release Is Now Rolling Out

    Developers have issued the first point release to GNOME 3.28, which was released last month.

    GNOME 3.28.1 brings a boat load of bug fixes for a stack of GNOME desktop components, modules and apps.

    And, because I know you’ll want ask, the answer is no: a fix for the big GNOME memory leak issue is not part of this update (though work is taking place to address it, so don’t panic).

  • GNOME 3.28.1 released

    Here comes our first update to GNOME 3.28, with many bug fixes,
    improvements, documentation and translation updates.

A Privacy & Security Concern Regarding GNOME Software

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GNOME
Security

GNOME Software is the default application in the GNOME desktop environment to manage software. It also allows you to receive firmware updates through an underlaying daemon called “fwupd“, which is based on an platform called “LVFS“.

In order to understand the relationship in a clearer way, you can think of LVFS as the online platform where hardware vendors come and upload new versions of their firmware which will be later available to download via fwupd. GNOME Software utilizes the fwupd daemon in order to download and install these updates. fwupd is a dependency for GNOME Software.

The whole ecosystem is developed mainly by Richard Hughes, who is working currently for Red Hat, and who’s also the original creator of PackageKit. But it’s worthy to mention that Red Hat doesn’t develop/manage the project directly, but rather, contributes to it with financial & logistic support.

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More in Tux Machines

Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will run Ubuntu Touch, as well as PureOS

Purism has partnered up with UBports to offer Ubuntu Touch as a supported operating system on its Librem 5 smartphone. The crowd-sourced, open-source smartphone runs Purism’s PureOS, by default. Purism is also working with GNOME for a version of PureOS with the KDE Plasma Mobile environment, giving users a choice between three OSes. Read more

Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X With Rise of The Tomb Raider On Linux

Here are our latest Linux gaming benchmarks comparing the Intel Core i7 8700K to the newly-released Ryzen 7 2700X. The focus in this article is on the Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux port released last week by Feral Interactive and powered by Vulkan. Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.5 and 4.14.37

today's leftovers

  • Heptio Debuts Gimbal Kubernetes Load Balancer Project
    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.
  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices
    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable. While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.
  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)
    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.
  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety
    In an effort to improve autonomous vehicle safety, Voyage is open sourcing its Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) library that contains the company’s internal safety procedures, materials, and test code that is intended to supplement the existing safety programs at autonomous vehicle startups. Voyage is the self-driving business from the educational organization Udacity.
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe
    The cloud native community is gathering in Copenhagen next week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe! Here’s your guide to the talks and events you won’t want to miss. Meet the Red Hat and CoreOS team members all week long, May 1-4 at booth D-E01.
  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)
    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.
  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format
    The good news is that the battleground is Free and Open. None of the big players are pushing closed-source solutions. Whether it is Keras and Tensorflow backed by Google, MXNet by Apache endorsed by Amazon, or Caffe2 or PyTorch supported by Facebook, all solutions are open-source software. Unfortunately, while these projects are open, they are not interoperable. Each framework constitutes a complete stack that until recently could not interface in any way with any other framework. A new industry-backed standard, the Open Neural Network Exchange format, could change that.
  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems
    The city's government believes the traffic/mapping app has made Los Angeles' congestion worse. That the very body tasked with finding solutions to this omnipresent L.A. problem is looking to hold a private third party company responsible for its own shortcomings isn't surprising. If a third-party app can't create better traffic flow, what chance do city planners have? But beyond the buck-passing on congestion, the city may have a point about Waze making driving around Los Angeles a bit more hazardous. For several months, it's been noted that Waze has been sending drivers careening down the steepest grade in the city -- Baxter Street. Drivers seeking routes around Glendale Ave. traffic choke points have been routed to a street with a 32% grade, increasing the number of accidents located there and generally resulting in barely-controlled mayhem. When any sort of precipitation falls from the sky, the city goes insane. Drivers bypassing Glendale are now hurtling down a steep, water-covered hill, compounding the problem.
  • Even Microsoft's lost interest in Windows Phone: Skype and Yammer apps killed
    Microsoft’s given users of its collaboration apps on Windows Phone under a month’s warning of their demise. A support note from late last week advises that “Windows phone apps for Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, and Yammer are retiring on May 20, 2018.” “Retiring” means all three will vanish from the Microsoft store on May 20, with differing results.
  • Should You Build Your Own DIY Security System?