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GSoC Work on KDE and GNOME, Epiphany Version Numbers

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Development
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • Week 4, Titler Tool and MLT – GSoC ’19

    It’s already been a month now, and this week – it hasn’t been the most exciting one. Mostly meddling with MLT, going through pages of documentation, compiling MLT and getting used to the MLT codebase.

    With the last week, I concluded with the rendering library part and now this week, I began writing a new producer in MLT for QML which will be rendered using the renderering library. So I went through a lot of MLT documentation, and it being a relatively new field for me, here is what I’ve gathered so far:

    At its core, MLT employs the basic producer-consumer concept. A producer produces data (here, frame objects) and a consumer consumes frames – as simple as that.

  • [Older] The Journey Begins | Google Summer of Code

    Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development. Students work with an open source organization on a 3 month programming project during their break from school.

  • Making the 'httpsrc' plugin asynchronous | GSoC 2019

    GStreamer plugins are the building units of any GStreamer application. The plugins can be linked and arranged in a pipeline. This pipeline defines the flow of the data. 'souphttpsrc', aka HTTP source is a plugin which reads data from a remote location specified by a URI and the supported protocols are 'http', 'https'. This plugin is written in C. 'rshttpsrc' is the Rust version of the above said plugin.

  • Michael Catanzaro: On Version Numbers

    I’m afraid 3.33.4 will arrive long before we make it to 3.33.3-333, so this is probably the last cool version number Epiphany will ever have.

    I might be guilty of using an empty commit to claim the -33 commit.

GNOME/Desktop: Xfway and GSoC with GNOME

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Xfway Aims To Provide A Wayland Compositor Inspired By Xfce's Xfwm4

    While it doesn't appear to be an official part of Xfce at least at this time, Xfway is a Wayland compositor inspired by Xfce's Xfwm4 window manager.

    Xfway was pointed out on the Wayland mailing list for this Xfce window manager inspired compositor.

    The code appears to have started out from the Weston code-base but adding support for Sway's WLROOTS among other changes inspired from Xfwm4.

  • GSoC with GNOME - Weeks 1 & 2

    The meson port for libgdata has been long due, and it was direly needed this time since Autotools 1.16.1 breaks an older API in such a way that at configure time, you get this issue. Moreover, even though you configure with --disable-dependency-tracking, at compile time you’re gifted with yet another error - Makefile:4517: *** missing separator. Stop.

    The issue stems from the fact that AX_CODE_COVERAGE recently changed the way it embeds code coverage rules in its outputted Makefile, i.e. the older @CODE_COVERAGE_RULES has been removed completely in support of including aminclude_static.am in Makefile.am. This all finally paved the way for libgdata’s meson port.

    Now, libgdata uses the namespace GData instead of Gdata and this raises quite a lot of issues when trying to create the enum header and source files using gnome.mkenums in meson. In autotools, we were using sed passes to edit out the generated enum files at compile time, and those files were being placed in their respective source directories. These files are further being included by other sources, and we can’t generate anything in the source directory because that’s the whole philosophy of meson, i.e. never clutter source directory for anything pertaining to build.

GNOME Annual Report 2018

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GNOME

We are very excited to share with you some of our best moments, achievements, and great conferences/events which happened throughout the year in our annual report.

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Also: GNOME Foundation Issues 2018 Annual Report - Massive Increase In Funding

Introducing GNOME Usage’s Storage panel

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GNOME

GNOME Usage is a new GNOME application to visualize system resources such as memory consumption and disk space. It has been developed by Petr Stetka, a high school intern in our Red Hat office in Brno. Petr is an outstanding coder for such a young fellow and has done a great job with Usage!

Usage is powered by libgtop, the same library used by GNOME System Monitor. One is not a replacement for the other, they complement our user experience by offering two different use cases: Usage is for the everyday user that wants to check which application is eating their resources, and System Monitor is for the expert that knows a bit of operating system internals and wants more technical information being displayed. Besides, Usage has a bit of Baobab too. It contains a Storage panel that allows for a quick analysis of disk space.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME Shell 3.33.3, GStreamer Rust Bindings 0.14.0 and Sysprof

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GNOME
  • GNOME Shell 3.33.3

    GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3 desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a visually attractive and easy to use experience.

  • GNOME Shell & Mutter See Their 3.33.3 Releases With Notable X11/Wayland Changes

    Arriving late, a few days after the GNOME 3.33.3 development snapshot, the Mutter and GNOME Shell updates are now available.

    The Mutter 3.33.3 window manager / compositor update is notable with preparations for running XWayland on-demand -- a.k.a. just when needed for X11 client usage and not constantly. The Mutter update also now honors the startup sequence workspace on Wayland, fixes around fractional scaling, adds the new Sysprof-based profiling support, adds mouse and locate-pointer accessibility, consolidates the frame throttling code, improves screencasting support on multi-monitor systems, fixes running X11 applications with sudo under Wayland, adds initial KMS transactional support, and there are many bug fixes.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.14.0 release

    Apart from updating to GStreamer 1.16, this release is mostly focussed on adding more bindings for various APIs and general API cleanup and bugfixes.

    The most notable API additions in this release are bindings for gst::Memory and gst::Allocator as well as bindings for gst_base::BaseParse and gst_video::VideoDecoder and VideoEncoder. The latter also come with support for implementing subclasses and the gst-plugins-rs module contains an video decoder and parser (for CDG), and a video encoder (for AV1) based on this.

  • Sysprof design work

    Since my last post, I’ve been working on a redesign of Sysprof (among other things) to make it a bit more useful and friendly to newcomers.

    Many years ago, I worked on a small profiler project called “Perfkit” that never really went anywhere. I had already done most of my UI research for this years ago, so it was pretty much just a matter of applying that design to the Sysprof code-base.

Nordic Theme on Ubuntu Desktop GNOME 3

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GNOME

Nordic is currently ranked #10 most popular GTK3 theme on OpenDesktop.org. This article exposes this theme beauty and explains how to install every component on Ubuntu 18.04. You can practice the installation procedures on other distros as long as it uses GNOME 3 as the user interface.

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GNOME Asia Summit 2019 Announced for GNOME 3.36 "Gresik" Desktop in Indonesia

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GNOME

Every year, the GNOME developers and contributors gather together for the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) and GNOME Asia Summit events to plan the next major release of their beloved, open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

While the GUADEC 2019 conference will kick off this summer between August 23rd and 28th, in Thessaloniki, Greece, for the upcoming GNOME 3.34 "Thessaloniki" desktop environment, the GNOME Asia Summit 2019 event will take place between October 11th and 13th, 2019, in Gresik, Indonesia.

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A Quick Look at GNOME Shell 3.34’s Newly Improved Theme

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GNOME

GNOME’s design team have made a number of changes designed to bring the shell theme in sync with the default Adwaita GTK theme, which was dramatically revamped for the release of GNOME 3.32 earlier this year.

The improvements headed to the desktop are likely to feature in the upcoming GNOME 3.34 release, due September.

Just don’t get too excited.

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GNOME 3.33.3 Released and More GNOME News

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.33.3 RELEASED!
    GNOME 3.33.3 is now available. Please try it out, test it, improve it.
    
    I'm the one sending this email but this release has really been made
    thanks to the others members of the Release Team; thanks Matthias,
    Abderrahim and Michael Catanzaro! (and of course you developers for
    release new versions of the modules)
    
    If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.3, you can use the official
    BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox, it
    should build reliably for you regardless of your host system:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.3/gnome-3.33.3.tar.xz
    
    The list of updated modules and changes is available here:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.3/NEWS
    
    The source packages are available here:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.3/sources/
    
    WARNING!
    --------
    This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
    buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
    purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
    status.
    
    For more information about 3.33, the full schedule, the official module
    lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.33 wiki page:
    
    https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable
    
    Cheers,
    Javier Jardón
    GNOME Release Team
  • GNOME 3.33.3 Released With Sysprof Profiling Integration, Other Improvements

    GNOME 3.33.3 is out this morning as the latest development release in the trek towards the very exciting GNOME 3.34 desktop update due out this September.

    Notable to GNOME 3.33.3 is the Sysprof profiling integration working its way through the key components like GJS and GTK. This Sysprof profiling integration is for developers to ultimately help optimize GNOME for better performance for end-users.

  • GNOME's Mutter Begins Landing Transactional KMS Support

    Adding to the excitement of GNOME 3.34 and the many changes being worked on is Mutter seeing the initial merging of transactional kernel mode-setting (KMS) support.

    This effort that has already been going on for months is about adopting a transactional API for Mutter so that it can make use of the Linux kernel's atomic KMS API. All of the key Linux DRM/KMS drivers these days support the atomic API (and is a requirement for merging of new drivers) but so far not many Linux desktop user-space components have switched over to using the new APIs.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 GNOME and display server changes

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 contains some important changes regarding the GNOME graphical interface and the default display server. If you are using a graphical desktop in RHEL 8, the most visible change will be that, by default, the GNOME Shell interface is used. This interface has a different appearance and operation compared to GNOME Classic, the default graphical interface in RHEL 7.

Here, we will cover an overview of the GNOME Shell interface in RHEL 8, and also how to switch to the GNOME Classic interface that is similar to the default interface on RHEL 7. We will also cover the new default display server, Wayland, and how to switch the display server to X.org X11 if needed. Another notable change in RHEL 8 is that the KDE Plasma interface has been removed.

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Android Leftovers

Firefox 69 Beta On Linux Bringing Better Performance

With the recent release of Mozilla Firefox 68 there are some nice WebRender performance improvements that Linux users can enjoy. But with Firefox 69 now in beta there is even better performance, including when enabling WebRender on Linux. Given the recent Firefox 68.0 release and Firefox 69.0 being promoted to beta, I ran some fresh browser benchmarks for checking out the current state of Mozilla's Linux performance from the Ubuntu desktop. The official Mozilla Firefox binaries for Linux x86_64 67.0.4, 68.0, and 69.0b3 were tested on the same system in a variety of browser benchmarks. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Btrfs Gets Cleaned Up & Code Refactoring For Linux 5.3

    David Sterba sent in the Btrfs file-system updates on Monday for the Linux 5.3 kernel. Btrfs for Linux 5.3 doesn't present any shiny new features but is mostly focused on bug fixes and low-level code improvements. One of the internal changes worth pointing out for Btrfs is changing its CRC32C usage so that it can be hardware-assisted on more architectures where native instructions or optimized code paths are available. More Btrfs code has also been positioned for more checksum algorithms moving forward.

  • g_array_binary_search in GLib 2.61.2

    The final API so far in this mini-series on new APIs in the GLib 2.62 series is g_array_binary_search(), put together by Emmanuel Fleury and based on code by Christian Hergert. It’s due to be released in 2.61.2 soon. But first, a reminder about GLib version numbering. Like the rest of GNOME’s official module set, GLib follows an odd/even versioning scheme, where every odd minor version number, like 2.61.x, is an unstable release building up to an even minor version number, like 2.62.x, which is stable. APIs may be added in unstable releases. They may be modified or even removed (if they haven’t been in a stable release yet). So all of the APIs I’ve blogged about recently still have a chance to be tweaked or dropped if people find problems with them. So if you see a problem or think that one of these APIs would be awkward to use in some way, please say, sooner rather than later! They need fixing before they’re in a stable release.

  • Rabimba: ARCore and Arkit: What is under the hood : Anchors and World Mapping (Part 1)

    Some of you know I have been recently experimenting a bit more with WebXR than a WebVR and when we talk about mobile Mixed Reality, ARkit and ARCore is something which plays a pivotal role to map and understand the environment inside our applications. I am planning to write a series of blog posts on how you can start developing WebXR applications now and play with them starting with the basics and then going on to using different features of it. But before that, I planned to pen down this series of how actually the "world mapping" works in arcore and arkit. So that we have a better understanding of the Mixed Reality capabilities of the devices we will be working with.

  • 10 Best Automated Backup Plugins for WordPress in 2019

    As an online business owner and/or site administrator it is important that you are always ahead of probable data damage by having a data contingency plan. On WordPress, this process has been simplified for all levels of users in the form of backup plugins that can enable you to automate full or partial backups which you can easily restore from later on. Today, we bring you a list of the 10 best plugins for backing up your WordPress site. They all feature a clean modern UI, in active development with millions of downloads, and most of them are 100% free!

today's howtos and software bits