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KDE and GNOME: KDE Itinerary, GLib/GTK and Sysprof for Mutter and GNOME Shell

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KDE
GNOME
  • April/May in KDE Itinerary

    A lot has happened again around KDE Itinerary since the last two month summary. A particular focus area at the moment is achieving “Akademy readiness”, that is being able to properly support trips to KDE Akademy in Milan early September, understanding the tickets of the Italian national railway is a first step into that direction.

  • More little testing

    Back in March, I wrote about µTest, a Behavior-Driven Development testing API for C libraries, and that I was planning to use it to replace the GLib testing API in Graphene.

    As I was busy with other things in GTK, it took me a while to get back to µTest—especially because I needed some time to set up a development environment on Windows in order to port µTest there. I managed to find some time over various weekends and evenings, and ended up fixing a couple of small issues here and there, to the point that I could run µTest’s own test suite on my Windows 10 box, and then get the CI build job I have on Appveyor to succeed as well.

  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Can Now Be Extensively Profiled For Missed Frames, Other Metrics

    While we've seen a lot of performance optimizations land in GNOME over the past year or two, we're likely to see more optimizations come now that Sysprof integration for GNOME Shell and Mutter has been merged that will allow profiling closely for missed frames and other performance metrics. 

    Earlier this week Sysprof lead developer Christian Hergert talked about the latest profiling abilities for this tool and since then integration work led in part by Georges Stavracas has been merged.

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Profiling GNOME Shell

    As of today, Mutter and GNOME Shell support Sysprof-based profiling.

    Christian wrote a fantastic piece exposing what happened to Sysprof during this cycle already, and how does it look like now, so I’ll skip that.

    Instead, let me focus on what I contributed the most: integrating Mutter/GNOME Shell to Sysprof.

GNOME and Fedora/Red Hat: Translation, Rust, Sysprof and EPEL

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Why translation platforms matter

    In my opinion, the GNOME platform offers the best translation platform for the following reasons:

    Its site contains both the team organization and the translation platform. It's easy to see who is responsible and their roles on the team. Everything is concentrated on a few screens.
    It's easy to find what to work on, and you quickly realize you'll have to download files to your computer and send them back once you modify them. It's not very sexy, but the logic is easy to understand.
    Once you send a file back, the platform can send an alert to the mailing list so the team knows the next steps and the translation can be easily discussed at the global level (rather than commenting on specific sentences).
    It has 297 languages.
    It shows clear percentages on progress, both on basic sentences and advanced menus and documentation.
    Coupled with a predictable GNOME release schedule, everything is available for the community to work well because the tool promotes community work.

    If we look at the Debian translation team, which has been doing a good job for years translating an unimaginable amount of content for Fedora (especially news), we see there is a highly codified translation process based exclusively on emails with a manual push in the repositories. This team also puts everything into the process, rather than the tools, and—despite the considerable energy this seems to require—it has worked for many years while being among the leading group of languages.

    My perception is that the primary issue for a successful translation platform is not based on the ability to make the unitary (technical, translation) work, but on how it structures and supports the translation team's processes. This is what gives sustainability.

    The production processes are the most important way to structure a team; by putting them together correctly, it's easy for newcomers to understand how processes work, adopt them, and explain them to the next group of newcomers.

    To build a sustainable community, the first consideration must be on a tool that supports collaborative work, then on its usability.

    This explains my frustration with the Zanata tool, which is efficient from a technical and interface standpoint, but poor when it comes to helping to structure a community. GIven that translation is a community-driven process (possibly one of the most community-driven processes in open source software development), this is a critical problem for me.

  • Federico Mena-Quintero: Bzip2 in Rust - Basic infrastructure and CRC32 computation

    I have started a little experiment in porting bits of the widely-used bzip2/bzlib to Rust. I hope this can serve to refresh bzip2, which had its last release in 2010 and has been nominally unmaintained for years.

    I hope to make several posts detailing how this port is done. In this post, I'll talk about setting up a Rust infrastructure for bzip2 and my experiments in replacing the C code that does CRC32 computations.

  • Sysprof Developments

    Earlier this month, Matthias and I teamed up to push through some of our profiling tooling for GTK and GNOME. We took the occasional work I had done on Sysprof over the past few years and integrated that into the GTK-4.x tree.

    Sysprof uses a binary log file to store information about execution in a matter that is easy to write-buffer and read-back using positioned reads. It helps keep the sampling overhead of sysprof low. But it’s too detail oriented for each application supporting the format to write. To make this stuff reusable I created a libsysprof-capture-3.a static library we embed from various layers of the platform.

    GTK-4.x is now using this. Builder itself uses it to log internal statistics, tracing data, and counters for troubleshooting. I’ve also put forward patches for GJS to integrate with it. Georges revamped and pushed forward a prototype by Jonas to integrate with Mutter/Shell and get us frame timings and Cogl pipeline data. With some work we can finish off the i915 data sources that Eric Anholt did to correlate GPU commands too.

    What this means for developers is that soon we’ll be able to capture system information from various layers in the stack and correlate them using similar clocks. We’re only scratching the surface right now, but it’s definitely promising. It’s already useful to quantify the true performance improvements of merge-requests in Mutter and Shell.

  • Sysprof Making Progress For Improved GNOME Profiling

    Christian Hergert of GNOME Builder IDE fame has been working on a round of improvements recently to the Sysprof tool he also leads development on for system profiling in determining the hot functions of a program and related profiling mostly around GNOME components.

    One of the main additions has been adding support to GTK4 for Sysprof's new engine and he is planning on plumbing that new engine support through to at least Mutter and GJS while potentially back-porting it to the likes of GTK3.

  • EPEL Proposal: EPEL Wagontrain (aka Steve Gallagher's EPEL 8 Branch Strategy)

5 best Gnome-based Linux distributions to check out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Gnome (AKA Gnome 3 or Gnome Shell) is the third iteration of the Gnome desktop environment. Its user-interface is split into a panel at the top, and a favorites dock on the left. Gnome is currently the most popular Linux desktop environment, and most major Linux distributions ship with it as the primary user-interface.

In the Linux world, many people are using Gnome as it is modern, and often the default choice. Even though it remains the most popular desktop on Linux, some Linux OSes do Gnome better than others. So, here are the 5 best Gnome-based Linux OSes to check out!

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Fedora and GNOME: Fedora's GNOME Shell, Matthew Miller, GNOME in Google Summer of Code and Upcoming GNOME Board Elections

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Red Hat
GNOME
  • 5 GNOME keyboard shortcuts to be more productive

    For some people, using GNOME Shell as a traditional desktop manager may be frustrating since it often requires more action of the mouse. In fact, GNOME Shell is also a desktop manager designed for and meant to be driven by the keyboard. Learn how to be more efficient with GNOME Shell with these 5 ways to use the keyboard instead of the mouse.

  • Matthew Miller (Fedora’s Project Leader) Fields Reddit Questions

    We got the following interesting news from Reddit website.

    Matthew Miller, Fedora’s Project Leader, has discussed with the community and answered all kind of questions via Reddit.

    he directly answered users questions in the public forum and it was happened for third time.

    He requested users to ask any questions except IBM deal.

    Users were asked many questions in various topics.

  • Battle-cruiser operational !

    I’m currently an engineering student and during my free time I contribute to this cool open-source app called GNOME Games (or just Games for short).

    One would expect an app with that name to be some kind of collection of mini games for GNOME but you would be wrong. Games markets itself as a “games manager”, which means it automatically detects all of the games installed on your machine and lists them, such that you have all of your games nicely gathered together in one window.

  • Getting Selected for Google SoC’19

    Today is a every special day for me. In my very first try, I cracked the Google Summer of Code. I am very delighted to have been given an oppurtunity to work for GNOME Foundation.

    My task is to rebuild the GTK website. For those interested in technicalities of the project, the current website is made in PHP which is a great web language, however not so useful for creating static websites. So my job is to build a new website from scratch which uses the concept of Content Management System. I will be using Jekyll for this purpose and the website would be deployed using Gitlab’s Continuous Integration.

  • The Journey Begins

    This blog is gonna be about my journey of Google Summer of Code. It was just few months ago, when I had no idea what GSoC is or how open source development works. Randomly, I stumbled upon youtube talks about open source development. The scale and boldness of OSDG really intrigued me. My whole life I have always been fascinated by new ideas or technologies, and it is my biggest dream to be part of such flow. I always like to challenge myself with new problems and tasks. So I dived into world of open source. When I decided I wanted to contribute to some org, I started looking for different types of orgs, I came across many orgs which sounded interesting. One of them was GNOME. I have been GNOME user since I started using laptops. I have been fascinated by the vast scale of GNOME applications. I definitely wanted to contribute something to this org. I started exploring different projects within GNOME, since all of them were interesting, I filtered projects by the technology I am most comfortable with.

  • Google Summer of Code 2019 with Gnome-Gitg

    I am really excited to share with you all that this summer I will be working full-time with Gnome on the project Implement side-by side diff view on the Gitg application.

    I am really grateful to the community who considered me the right person for the job and gave me this wonderful opportunity.

  • Why you can and should apply for the board

    It’s GNOME board elections time!

    Community members can apply to become GNOME Foundation directors, and the process is quite easy, it’s just about sending an email to two mailing lists. We can improve on the number of participation though, and having a good amount of applicants is important for having a healthy foundation - the more applicants there are, the more likely that different views, skills and working areas are represented.

    I believe one of the big factors of not having high participation in elections is the lack of knowledge of what the board does and how much of a commitment it is. Because of that, we question whether we are ready for taking on the position. While minutes published by the board are an excellent tool (and I really need to thank Phillip and Federico here), minutes usually don’t tell the whole story.

GNOME 3.34 Revamps the Wallpaper Picker (And Fixes a Longstanding Issue Too)

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GNOME

The upcoming release of GNOME 3.34 will finally solve a long standing deficiency in the desktop’s background wallpaper management.

Now, I’ve written about various quirks in GNOME wallpaper handling before, but it’s the lack of option to pick a random wallpaper from a random directory via the Settings > Background panel that is, by far, my biggest bug bear.

Ubuntu 19.04 ships with GNOME 3.32. Here, the only wallpapers available to select via the Settings > Background section are those the system ships with and any top-level images placed in ~/Pictures — nothing else is selectable.

So, to set a random image as a wallpaper in GNOME 3.32 I tend to ignore the background settings panel altogether and instead use the image viewer’s File > Set as background… option (or the similar Nautilus right-click setting).

Thankfully, not for much longer!

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GNOME 3.33.2 released!

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GNOME

Hello GNOME developers,

GNOME 3.33.2 is now available. This is the second unstable release
leading to 3.34 stable series.

I had to disable gnome-contacts, gnome-calendar and gnome-maps because of the not-very-well coordinated evolution-data-server transition.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.2, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot.

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.2/gnome-3.33.2.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.2/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.2/sources/

WARNING!
--------
This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
status.

For more information about 3.34, the full schedule, the official module
lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.33 wiki page:

https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable


Cheers,

Abderrahim Kitouni,
GNOME Release Team

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Also: GNOME 3.33.2 Released As Another Step Towards The GNOME 3.34 Desktop

KDE and GNOME: Kube, EndlessOS, Pango and Harfbuzz

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Last months in Kube

    You may have noticed that it’s been a while since the last release. This is not only because releases are additional work, but also because we already have a continuous delivery method with the nightly flatpak.

    It’s clear that releases do provide value, both as a communication tool which version should be packaged, and if they would be maintained. With the current manpower we cannot maintain releases though, which makes it significantly less interesting.

    With that said, the 0.8 release with the calendar is now long overdue and should be coming out soonish.

  • Daniel García Moreno: EndlessOS dual boot with Fedora
  • Matthias Clasen: Pango future directions

    This doesn’t mean that text rendering is in decline. Far from it. In fact, Harfbuzz is more active than ever and has had unprecedented success: All major Web browsers, toolkits, and applications are using it.

    We’ve discussed for a while how to best take advantage of Harfbuzz’ success for text rendering on the desktop. Our conclusion is that we have to keep Pango from getting in the way. It should be a thin and translucent layer, and not require us to plumb APIs for every new feature through several internal abstractions.

    We have identified several steps that will let us make progress towards this goal.

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

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GNOME
  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”

    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”.

    The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults.

    By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.

  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand

    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches.

    The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)

    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking.

    One of these areas is keyboard shortcut.

    Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to.

    Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all.

    However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do.

    In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad.

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GParted 1.0 Release Approaching For Linux Partition Editor - Live 1.0 Beta Released

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GNOME

The GParted graphical partition editor for Linux systems has been around for 14 years and finally it's looking like the version 1.0 release is on the horizon.

GParted 1.0 could be the release succeeding last December's GParted 0.33 release, including for the GParted Live operating system that is a live Linux distribution designed for an easy workflow of managing the partitions/disks on your system.

GParted Live 1.0 Beta appeared today with the latest GParted bits. This Linux distribution also pulls in the latest packages against Debian Sid experimental, updates to using the Linux 4.19.37 kernel, updates the boot menu options, and is based on the upstream GParted 1.0 beta code.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: Genome Browsers, EtherCalc and Curl

  • Best Free Web Based Genome Browsers

    In the fields of molecular biology and genetics, a genome is the genetic material of an organism. It consists of DNA (or RNA in RNA viruses). Each genome contains all of the information needed to build and maintain that organism. In humans, a copy of the entire genome—more than 3 billion DNA base pairs—is contained in all cells that have a nucleus. The study of the genome is called genomics. In bioinformatics, a genome browser is a graphical interface for display of information from a biological database for genomic data. They are important tools for studying genomes given the vast amounts of data available. They typically load very large files, such as whole genome FASTA files and display them in a way that users can make sense of the information there. They can be used to visualize a variety of different data types. Genome browsers enable researchers to visualize and browse entire genomes with annotated data including gene prediction and structure, proteins, expression, regulation, variation, comparative analysis, etc. They use a visual, high-level overview of complex data in a form that can be grasped at a glance and provide the means to explore the data in increasing resolution from megabase scales down to the level of individual elements of the DNA sequence. There’s a wide range of web based genome browsers. We’re going to restrict our selection to the top 4.

  • Get going with EtherCalc, a web-based alternative to Google Sheets

    EtherCalc is an open source spreadsheet that makes it easy to work remotely and collaborate with others.

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl 7.65.2 fixes even more

    Six weeks after our previous bug-fix release, we ship a second release in a row with nothing but bug-fixes. We call it 7.65.2. We decided to go through this full release cycle with a focus on fixing bugs (and not merge any new features) since even after 7.65.1 shipped as a bug-fix only release we still seemed to get reports indicating problems we wanted fixed once and for all. Download curl from curl.haxx.se as always! Also, I personally had a vacation already planned to happen during this period (and I did) so it worked out pretty good to take this cycle as a slightly calmer one. Of the numbers below, we can especially celebrate that we’ve now received code commits by more than 700 persons!

100 Essential Linux Commands for Every User

Normal Linux user knows almost all the basic Linux day-to-day use commands to perform basic task such as installing any application, copying files from one directory to another, etc. But in this article I’m going to list 100 essential Linux commands which can be useful for every Linux user right from the noobs to the professional Linux developers and system administrators.So before wasting any time let’s get started with this huge list of essential Linux commands. Read more

today's howtos

Sparky 5.8 “Nibiru”

There are new live/install media of SparkyLinux 5.8 “Nibiru” available to download. This is the 1st release of the new stable line, which is based on the Debian 10 “Buster”. Changes: – based on Debian 10 stable “Buster” now, repositories changed from ‘testing’ to ‘stable’ – system upgraded from Debian stable “Buster” repos as of July 14, 2019 – Linux kernel 4.19.37-5 (i686 & amd64) – Linux kernel 4.19.57-v7+ (ARMHF) – the Calamares installer updated up to version 3.2.11 – apt-daily.service disabled – sparky-tube installed as dafault – removed old 3rd party repositories – added obconf-qt (LXQt edition) – nm-tray installed instead of network-manager-gnome (LXQt edition) – network-manager added to CLI ARMHF image – small fixes Read more