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GNOME

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad.

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GParted 1.0 Release Approaching For Linux Partition Editor - Live 1.0 Beta Released

Filed under
GNOME

The GParted graphical partition editor for Linux systems has been around for 14 years and finally it's looking like the version 1.0 release is on the horizon.

GParted 1.0 could be the release succeeding last December's GParted 0.33 release, including for the GParted Live operating system that is a live Linux distribution designed for an easy workflow of managing the partitions/disks on your system.

GParted Live 1.0 Beta appeared today with the latest GParted bits. This Linux distribution also pulls in the latest packages against Debian Sid experimental, updates to using the Linux 4.19.37 kernel, updates the boot menu options, and is based on the upstream GParted 1.0 beta code.

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GNOME 3.34's Mutter Lowers Output Lag On X11 To Match Wayland Performance

Filed under
GNOME

Adding to the list of positive changes with GNOME 3.34 due out this September is lowering possible output lag when running GNOME's Mutter on X11/X.Org.

GNOME has experienced higher output lag on X.Org-based sessions rather than Wayland in some configurations. In particular, the higher output lag on X11 could be experienced when dragging around windows and seeing possible lag. Fortunately, as of today's latest Mutter 3.33 series development code, that lag has been addressed.

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Comparing Search between Nautilus and Nemo File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Personally, I like Nemo search better than Nautilus search as I need to sort everything I find and I cannot do that with Nautilus. I love sort by Date/Descending as I use it everyday.

Apparently, not only me saying this. I don't know why this once-existed feature removed in current versions of Nautilus, as normal interface provides sorting but search interface does not. I will not wonder if somebody ask "why not removing sort in the normal interface as well?" or such.

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The Two Solitudes of GNOME and KDE

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

Novelist Hugh MacLennan once described Canada as “two solitudes” — an English-speaking one and a French-speaking one, neither of which had much to do with the other. The description is decades out-dated, and today a dozen solitudes might be more accurate. However, the phrase echoes in my mind whenever I think of the gulf today between GNOME technologies and KDE software compilations. Although both are based on the Linux kernel, the expectations and philosophies are different enough that they might almost be different operating systems.

The difference has not always existed. When GNOME and KDE began in the late 1990s, both were scrambling hard to match desktops on other operating systems. Widgets aside, the differences were minimal. For years the two graphical interfaces regularly traded places on reader surveys, with perhaps a slight edge for GNOME, depending on the magazine or site conducting the survey. Flame wars could be fierce, but like many flame wars, the fierceness reflected how trivial the differences mostly were — at least, after KDE’s Qt toolkit became free software. The difference was largely one of branding.

Still, GNOME and KDE each slowly developed its own ecosystem of applications. A few applications like OpenOffice.org were shared, presumably because developing alternative for large applications was difficult. Moreover, the popularity of some apps like Firefox overwhelmed native alternatives like KDE’s Konqueror. But in categories like music-players, archivers, and CD burners, each slowly started to developed its own set of tools.

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Getting started with GNOME Boxes virtualization

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

I've been a fan of virtualization technology for many years, using many different products along the way. Virtualization has advantages for both the data center and the desktop: data centers use it to increase server hardware utilization, while desktop users use it for modeling, testing, and development work. One operating system running on top of a different one on the same hardware, all thanks to the concept of a virtual machine (VM).

I recently upgraded my laptop from Fedora 29 Workstation Edition Linux to version 30. I noticed GNOME Boxes, simply titled Boxes, in my application menu. The GNOME Project—whose members are the creators and maintainers of the GNOME Desktop Environment—describes GNOME Boxes as: "A simple GNOME application to view, access, and manage remote and virtual systems." Of course, I had to check this tool out.

This two part series article will cover two of the main features of Boxes. While writing this article, I used Boxes version 3.32.0.2-stable. Since the GNOME Boxes project refers to a VM as a "box," I'll use that terminology.

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‘Remotely’ is a Simple VNC Viewer For Linux Desktops

Filed under
Software
GNOME

Simple by design, Remotely is not packed full of advanced features.

Remotely does not have VNC server capabilities built-in. While you can connect to a VNC server on a different device you cannot use the app to ‘share’ a desktop with another device.

So if you need an expansive, fully featured remote desktop client with support for protocols other than VNC, stick with Remmina — it even comes preinstalled in Ubuntu!

Otherwise, have at it!

Remotely is free, open source software. It’s available to install from Flathub, the Flatpak app store:

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KDE and GNOME Progress: Krita, KIOFuse, Rust

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • My Project for Google Summer of Code

    I was accepted to Google Summer of Code and now I need to start planning and doing research to help the best way I can.

    My project is an Animated Vector Brush (AVB) for Krita. This might not say much, so allow me to explain what my project is and what are my objectives.

  • KIOFuse – GSoC 2019

    It’s been a great pleasure to be chosen to work with KDE during GSoC this year. I’ll be working on KIOFuse and hopefully by the end of the coding period it will be well integrated with KIO itself. Development will mainly by coordinated on the #kde-fm channel (IRC Nick: feverfew) with fortnightly updates on my blog so feel free to pop by! Here’s a small snippet of my proposal to give everyone an idea of what I’ll be working on:

  • Guillaume Desmottes: Rust+GNOME hackfest in Berlin

    Last week I had the chance to attend for the first time the GNOME+Rust Hackfest in Berlin. My goal was to finish the GstVideoDecoder bindings, keep learning about Rust and meet people from the GNOME/Rust community. I had some experience with gstreamer-rs as an user but never actually wrote any bindings myself. To make it even more challenging the underlying C API is unfortunatelly unsafe so we had to do some smart tricks to make it safe to use in Rust.

    I'm very happy with the work I managed to do during these 4 days. I was able to complete the bindings as well as my CDG decoder using them. The bindings are waiting for final review and the decoder should hopefully be merged soon as well.

These Mockups Show How the GNOME Shell Notification Experience Could Be Improved

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME design team explore a raft of ideas and refinements to the notification feature in mockups posted on the GNOME design Gitlab.

These potential revamps both reimagine and redefine what the GNOME notification experience could and should be — and personally, I think a rethink is sorely needed.

The GNOME Shell notification area (aka the ‘date and clock applet’ aka ‘message tray’ aka ‘calendar widget’) is a core part of the GNOME Shell desktop experience. It’s where notifications go when you miss them, where MPRIS controls surface, and where upcoming calendar events and alerts are listed

Right now the GNOME Shell notification/calendar area offers a frill-free experience. Functional, but not exceptional; providing only basic notification management options. Heck, it doesn’t even have offer a ‘do not disturb’ mode!

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GNOME Chromecast Extension "Cast to TV" v9 Adds Subtitle Configuration, Nautilus Integration

Filed under
Google
GNOME

For the latest Cast to TV v9, the extension settings were redesigned, and there are some new options. The most important change is in my opinion, the addition of Chromecast subtitle settings - you can now change the subtitle font family, style, size, color, outline or background color.

The new version ships with an easier way of installing the required npm modules - a button to install the modules was added to the Modules tab.

Yet another new option allows hiding the remote label (the text shown on the top bar for the Chromecast remote when casting), a useful addition since the text was quite long and it wasn't showing any useful information.

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More in Tux Machines

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things. Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of. That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution. That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different. Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type. For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever. Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn. Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon. Read more

Hardware With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation ? where do thou go? ? Stay out of the Desktop and you shalt be paid
  • Acer Chromebook R 11 C738T
  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K02US
  • Acer Chromebook 14
  • HP Chromebook 11 G5 - X9U02UT
  • Acer Chromebook Spin 15
  • HP Chromebook x2
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C213SA
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus - XE513C24-K01US
  • Samsung Chromebook Pro - XE510C25-K01US
  • ASUS Chromebit CS10
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DSM4T
  • Lenovo Chromebook S330 - 81JW0001US
  • Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

    As it relates to memory technologies, the future looks very promising and very exciting. Will the SSD completely replace the traditional spinning HDD? I doubt it. Look at tape technology. It's still around and continues to find a place in the archival storage space. The HDD most likely will have a similar fate. Although until then, the HDD will continue to compete with the SSD in both price and capacity.

  • Jonathan McDowell: Upgrading my home server

    At the end of last year I decided it was time to upgrade my home server. I built it back in 2013 as an all-in-one device to be my only always-on machine, with some attempt towards low power consumption. It was starting to creak a bit - the motherboard is limited to 16G RAM and the i3-3220T is somewhat ancient (though has served me well). So it was time to think about something more up to date. Additionally since then my needs have changed; my internet connection is VDSL2 (BT Fibre-to-the-Cabinet) so I have an BT HomeHub 5 running OpenWRT to drive that and provide core routing/firewalling. My wifi is provided by a pair of UniFi APs at opposite ends of the house. I also decided I could use something low power to run Kodi and access my ripped DVD collection, rather than having the main machine in the living room. That meant what I wanted was much closer to just a standard server rather than having any special needs. The first thing to consider was a case. My ADSL terminates in what I call the “comms room” - it has the electricity meter / distribution board and gas boiler, as well as being where one of the UniFi’s lives and where the downstairs ethernet terminates. In short it’s the right room for a server to live in. I don’t want a full rack, however, and ideally wanted something that could sit alongside the meter cabinet without protruding from the wall any further. A tower case would have worked, but only if turned sideways, which would have made it a bit awkward to access. I tried in vain to find a wall mount case with side access that was shallow enough, but failed. However in the process I discovered a 4U vertical wall mount. This was about the same depth as the meter cabinet, so an ideal choice. I paired it with a basic 2U case from X-Case, giving me a couple of spare U should I decide I want another rack-mount machine or two.

New Releases of GNU/Linux: Clonezilla, EasyOS and ARCOLINUX

OSS Leftovers

  • Kubernetes: The retro-style, Wild West video game

    The Kubernetes API is amazing, and not only are we going to break it down and show you how to wield this mighty weapon, but we will do it while building a video game, live, on stage. As a matter of fact, you get to play along.

  • Celebrating Kubernetes and 5 Years of Open Source

    5 years ago, Kubernetes was born and quickly became one of the most important open-source platform innovations. Today, its Github repository boasts 55,384 stars and 2,205 contributors! We?re not just celebrating Kubernetes and how much easier it makes our lives, but we?re also celebrating the open-source community that added to the container management tool; making it what it is today. When you have an entire community working together to innovate and improve, the possibilities are endless.

  • Public Statement on Neutrality of Free Software

    F-Droid won’t tolerate oppression or harassment against marginalized groups. Because of this, it won’t package nor distribute apps that promote any of these things. This includes that it won’t distribute an app that promotes the usage of previously mentioned website, by either its branding, its pre-filled instance domain or any other direct promotion. This also means F-Droid won’t allow oppression or harassment to happen at its communication channels, including its forum. In the past week, we failed to fulfill this goal on the forum, and we want to apologize for that.

  • What open-source culture can teach tech titans and their critics
                   
                     

    Yet Mozilla turns out to be much more consequential than its mixed record and middling numbers would have you believe. There are three reasons for this.  

  • Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6. The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

  • An Indian research university has assembled 73 million journal articles (without permission) and is offering the archive for unfettered scientific text-mining

    The JNU Data Depot is a joint project between rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously), bioinformatician Andrew Lynn, and a research team from New Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University: together, they have assembled 73 million journal articles from 1847 to the present day and put them into an airgapped respository that they're offering to noncommercial third parties who want to perform textual analysis on them to "pull out insights without actually reading the text."

    This text-mining process is already well-developed and has produced startling scientific insights, including "databases of genes and chemicals, map[s of] associations between proteins and diseases, and [automatically] generate[d] useful scientific hypotheses." But the hard limit of this kind of text mining is the paywalls that academic and scholarly publishers put around their archives, which both limit who can access the collections and what kinds of queries they can run against them.

  • The plan to mine the world’s research papers [iophk: this is the kind of collection that Aaron Swartz died over, effectively killed]