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GNOME

KDE and GNOME: Kube, EndlessOS, Pango and Harfbuzz

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Last months in Kube

    You may have noticed that it’s been a while since the last release. This is not only because releases are additional work, but also because we already have a continuous delivery method with the nightly flatpak.

    It’s clear that releases do provide value, both as a communication tool which version should be packaged, and if they would be maintained. With the current manpower we cannot maintain releases though, which makes it significantly less interesting.

    With that said, the 0.8 release with the calendar is now long overdue and should be coming out soonish.

  • Daniel García Moreno: EndlessOS dual boot with Fedora
  • Matthias Clasen: Pango future directions

    This doesn’t mean that text rendering is in decline. Far from it. In fact, Harfbuzz is more active than ever and has had unprecedented success: All major Web browsers, toolkits, and applications are using it.

    We’ve discussed for a while how to best take advantage of Harfbuzz’ success for text rendering on the desktop. Our conclusion is that we have to keep Pango from getting in the way. It should be a thin and translucent layer, and not require us to plumb APIs for every new feature through several internal abstractions.

    We have identified several steps that will let us make progress towards this goal.

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

Filed under
GNOME
  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”

    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”.

    The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults.

    By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.

  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand

    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches.

    The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)

    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking.

    One of these areas is keyboard shortcut.

    Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to.

    Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all.

    However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do.

    In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad.

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GParted 1.0 Release Approaching For Linux Partition Editor - Live 1.0 Beta Released

Filed under
GNOME

The GParted graphical partition editor for Linux systems has been around for 14 years and finally it's looking like the version 1.0 release is on the horizon.

GParted 1.0 could be the release succeeding last December's GParted 0.33 release, including for the GParted Live operating system that is a live Linux distribution designed for an easy workflow of managing the partitions/disks on your system.

GParted Live 1.0 Beta appeared today with the latest GParted bits. This Linux distribution also pulls in the latest packages against Debian Sid experimental, updates to using the Linux 4.19.37 kernel, updates the boot menu options, and is based on the upstream GParted 1.0 beta code.

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GNOME 3.34's Mutter Lowers Output Lag On X11 To Match Wayland Performance

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GNOME

Adding to the list of positive changes with GNOME 3.34 due out this September is lowering possible output lag when running GNOME's Mutter on X11/X.Org.

GNOME has experienced higher output lag on X.Org-based sessions rather than Wayland in some configurations. In particular, the higher output lag on X11 could be experienced when dragging around windows and seeing possible lag. Fortunately, as of today's latest Mutter 3.33 series development code, that lag has been addressed.

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Comparing Search between Nautilus and Nemo File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Personally, I like Nemo search better than Nautilus search as I need to sort everything I find and I cannot do that with Nautilus. I love sort by Date/Descending as I use it everyday.

Apparently, not only me saying this. I don't know why this once-existed feature removed in current versions of Nautilus, as normal interface provides sorting but search interface does not. I will not wonder if somebody ask "why not removing sort in the normal interface as well?" or such.

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The Two Solitudes of GNOME and KDE

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

Novelist Hugh MacLennan once described Canada as “two solitudes” — an English-speaking one and a French-speaking one, neither of which had much to do with the other. The description is decades out-dated, and today a dozen solitudes might be more accurate. However, the phrase echoes in my mind whenever I think of the gulf today between GNOME technologies and KDE software compilations. Although both are based on the Linux kernel, the expectations and philosophies are different enough that they might almost be different operating systems.

The difference has not always existed. When GNOME and KDE began in the late 1990s, both were scrambling hard to match desktops on other operating systems. Widgets aside, the differences were minimal. For years the two graphical interfaces regularly traded places on reader surveys, with perhaps a slight edge for GNOME, depending on the magazine or site conducting the survey. Flame wars could be fierce, but like many flame wars, the fierceness reflected how trivial the differences mostly were — at least, after KDE’s Qt toolkit became free software. The difference was largely one of branding.

Still, GNOME and KDE each slowly developed its own ecosystem of applications. A few applications like OpenOffice.org were shared, presumably because developing alternative for large applications was difficult. Moreover, the popularity of some apps like Firefox overwhelmed native alternatives like KDE’s Konqueror. But in categories like music-players, archivers, and CD burners, each slowly started to developed its own set of tools.

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Getting started with GNOME Boxes virtualization

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

I've been a fan of virtualization technology for many years, using many different products along the way. Virtualization has advantages for both the data center and the desktop: data centers use it to increase server hardware utilization, while desktop users use it for modeling, testing, and development work. One operating system running on top of a different one on the same hardware, all thanks to the concept of a virtual machine (VM).

I recently upgraded my laptop from Fedora 29 Workstation Edition Linux to version 30. I noticed GNOME Boxes, simply titled Boxes, in my application menu. The GNOME Project—whose members are the creators and maintainers of the GNOME Desktop Environment—describes GNOME Boxes as: "A simple GNOME application to view, access, and manage remote and virtual systems." Of course, I had to check this tool out.

This two part series article will cover two of the main features of Boxes. While writing this article, I used Boxes version 3.32.0.2-stable. Since the GNOME Boxes project refers to a VM as a "box," I'll use that terminology.

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‘Remotely’ is a Simple VNC Viewer For Linux Desktops

Filed under
Software
GNOME

Simple by design, Remotely is not packed full of advanced features.

Remotely does not have VNC server capabilities built-in. While you can connect to a VNC server on a different device you cannot use the app to ‘share’ a desktop with another device.

So if you need an expansive, fully featured remote desktop client with support for protocols other than VNC, stick with Remmina — it even comes preinstalled in Ubuntu!

Otherwise, have at it!

Remotely is free, open source software. It’s available to install from Flathub, the Flatpak app store:

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KDE and GNOME Progress: Krita, KIOFuse, Rust

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • My Project for Google Summer of Code

    I was accepted to Google Summer of Code and now I need to start planning and doing research to help the best way I can.

    My project is an Animated Vector Brush (AVB) for Krita. This might not say much, so allow me to explain what my project is and what are my objectives.

  • KIOFuse – GSoC 2019

    It’s been a great pleasure to be chosen to work with KDE during GSoC this year. I’ll be working on KIOFuse and hopefully by the end of the coding period it will be well integrated with KIO itself. Development will mainly by coordinated on the #kde-fm channel (IRC Nick: feverfew) with fortnightly updates on my blog so feel free to pop by! Here’s a small snippet of my proposal to give everyone an idea of what I’ll be working on:

  • Guillaume Desmottes: Rust+GNOME hackfest in Berlin

    Last week I had the chance to attend for the first time the GNOME+Rust Hackfest in Berlin. My goal was to finish the GstVideoDecoder bindings, keep learning about Rust and meet people from the GNOME/Rust community. I had some experience with gstreamer-rs as an user but never actually wrote any bindings myself. To make it even more challenging the underlying C API is unfortunatelly unsafe so we had to do some smart tricks to make it safe to use in Rust.

    I'm very happy with the work I managed to do during these 4 days. I was able to complete the bindings as well as my CDG decoder using them. The bindings are waiting for final review and the decoder should hopefully be merged soon as well.

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More in Tux Machines

Announcing Qt for MCUs

  • Announcing Qt for MCUs

    Today we announce the launch of Qt for MCUs – a comprehensive toolkit to deliver smartphone-like user experience on displays powered by microcontrollers. What started as a research project is now in the final leg of its journey to being released as a product. Connected devices found in vehicles, wearables, smart home, industrial and healthcare often have requirements that include real-time processing capabilities, low power consumption, instant boot time and low bill of materials. These requirements can be fulfilled by a microcontroller architecture. However, as devices get smarter and offer more features and capabilities, users expect an enhanced and intuitive experience on par with today’s smartphones. Qt for MCUs delivers an immersive and enriching user interface by utilizing a new runtime specifically developed for ARM Cortex-M microcontrollers and leveraging on-chip 2D graphics accelerators such as PxP on NXP’s i.MX RT series, Chrom-Art Accelerator on STM32 series and RGL on Renesas RH850.

  • Qt for MCUs – Qt Announces support for Microcontrollers

    About Qt for MCUs Qt- The well known opensource toolkit for creating graphical interface announced their new release: Qt for MCUs, targeting MCU’s.

  • The Qt Company Is Now Working On Qt For Microcontrollers

    There have been a lot of announcements pertaining to Qt as of late, most of which have been about forthcoming efforts around Qt 6 development. A new announcement out of The Qt Company catching us off-guard is their plans for the tool-kit on micro-controllers. Qt for MCUs is the company's newest commercial endeavour. In particular, they are working on the Qt tool-kit for displays powered by micro-controllers for smartphone-like user experiences. Qt for MCUs has been a research project at the company but is now being worked out as a new commercial offering. Considering how well though Qt works on mobile devices, it's only another step down catering it to low-power micro-controllers.

Games: Rogue State Revolution, No Man's Sky, Two Point Hospital: Close Encounters

  • Little Red Dog Games announce Rogue State Revolution, a political thriller roguelike

    Little Red Dog Games (Precipice, Deep Sixed, Rogue State) have announced Rogue State Revolution, what they say is the "first" political roguelike game. It's being published by Modern Wolf, a new indie publisher who doesn't believe in crunch who say they treat their developers "like partners, not like cogs in a machine". [...] Doesn't seem to have a trailer yet, will let you know what it does. They're also continuing to use the FOSS game engine Godot Engine again, nice to see!

  • Hello Games appear to be keeping an eye on Steam Play with No Man's Sky, temp fix needed for NVIDIA

    No Man's Sky recently had an absolutely ridiculous update to add in tons of new features and greatly expanded multiplayer. This update also added in Vulkan support too! It seems Hello Games are keeping an eye on Steam Play as well, with a recent update changelog noting "Fixed Steam VR in Linux.". Quite interesting! However, there is a bit of a problem for NVIDIA users with Steam Play on Linux, with the game performing quite poorly. Although, there's a slightly amusing workaround.

  • Things are about to get weird in the Two Point Hospital: Close Encounters expansion

    Two Point Studios and SEGA just announced the next expansion for their amusing hospital building sim with Two Point Hospital: Close Encounters. It's coming soon too! Their plan is to release it on August 29th next week. This will be the third expansion following on from Bigfoot and Pebberley Island. Two Point Hospital is already quite weird but this is really…out there. It will be adding in 3 new hospitals full of patients to cure, 34 new illnesses although they say only 11 of these are new visually along with a promise of "new" gameplay, new music and so on.

Useful security software from the Snap Store

Once upon a time, password management was a simple thing. There were few services around, the Internet was a fairly benign place, and we often used the same combo of username and password for many of them. But as the Internet grew and the threat landscape evolved, the habits changed. In the modern Web landscape, there are thousands of online services, and many sites also require logins to allow you to use their full functionality. With data breaches a common phenomenon nowadays, tech-savvy users have adopted a healthier practice of avoiding credentials re-use. However, this also creates a massive administrative burden, as people now need to memorize hundreds of usernames and their associated passwords. The solution to this fairly insurmountable challenge is the use of secure, encrypted digital password wallets, which allow you to keep track of your endless list of sites, services and their relevant credentials. KeePassXC does exactly that. The program comes with a simple, fairly intuitive interface. On first run, you will be able to select your encryption settings, including the ability to use KeePassXC in conjunction with a YubiKey. Once the application is configured, you can then start adding entries, including usernames, passwords, any notes, links to websites, and even attachments. The contents are stored in a database file, which you can easily port or copy, so you also gain an element of extra flexibility – as well as the option to back up your important data. Read more Also: US Hangs Tough on Restricting Huawei’s Participation in Standards Development

Raccoon – APK Downloader for Linux, MacOS, and Windows

We’ve covered APK stories before in articles like the one about F-Droid and Google Play Downloader, but never have we covered an app as cool as this one with a name inspired by the North American mammal, Raccoon. Raccoon is a free and modern open-source APK downloader application that enables you to safely download any Android app available on Google Play Store to your Linux, Windows, or Mac desktop. The incentive of Raccoon is to enable users to install Android apps without sending any kind of information to Google. It also works to store APK files locally, use a “Split APK” format, bypass application region restrictions, and aims to improve your phone’s battery life. Read more