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Horde vs Roundcube vs Squirrelmail - Which Works Best

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Server
Software
Web

Webmail is a great way to access your emails from different devices and when you are away from your home. Now, most web hosting companies include email with their server plans. And all of them offer the same three, webmail clients as well: RoundCube, Horde, and SquirrelMail. They are part of the cPanel - most popular hosting control panel.

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Kubernetes 1.15

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Server
OSS
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Extensibility and Continuous Improvement

    The theme of the new developments around CustomResourceDefinitions is data consistency and native behaviour. A user should not notice whether the interaction is with a CustomResource or with a Golang-native resource. With big steps we are working towards a GA release of CRDs and GA of admission webhooks in one of the next releases.

    In this direction, we have rethought our OpenAPI based validation schemas in CRDs and from 1.15 on we check each schema against a restriction called “structural schema”. This basically enforces non-polymorphic and complete typing of each field in a CustomResource. We are going to require structural schemas in the future, especially for all new features including those listed below, and list violations in a NonStructural condition. Non-structural schemas keep working for the time being in the v1beta1 API group. But any serious CRD application is urged to migrate to structural schemas in the foreseeable future.

    Details about what makes a schema structural will be published in a blog post on kubernetes.io later this week, and it is of course documented in the Kubernetes documentation.

  • Kubernetes 1.15 now available from Canonical

    Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.15 using kubeadm deployments, its Charmed Kubernetes, and MicroK8s; the popular single-node deployment of Kubernetes.

    The MicroK8s community continues to grow and contribute enhancements, with Knative and RBAC support now available through the simple microk8s.enable command. Knative is a great way to experiment with serverless computing, and now you can experiment locally through MicroK8s. With MicroK8s 1.15 you can develop and deploy Kubernetes 1.15 on any Linux desktop, server or VM across 40 Linux distros. Mac and Windows are supported too, with Multipass.

    Existing Charmed Kubernetes users can upgrade smoothly to Kubernetes 1.15, regardless of the underlying hardware or machine virtualisation. Supported deployment targets include AWS, GCE, Azure, Oracle, VMware, OpenStack, LXD, and bare metal.

  • Kubernetes 1.15 Released

    The Kubernetes community has announced the release of Kubernetes 1.15, the second release of 2019. The release focuses on Continuous Improvement and Extensibility. Work on making Kubernetes installation, upgrade and configuration even more robust has been a major focus for this cycle for SIG Cluster Lifecycle. The release comes in time just before KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Shanghai, which will bring the larger cloud-native community together in China. Read more about what's new in Kubernetes 1.15 here.

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

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GNU
Linux
Server

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux.

Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight.

When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores.

And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course.
.
133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed.

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Red Hat welcomes Oracle to the oVirt community

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Red Hat
Server

On behalf of the oVirt community, its contributors and Red Hat, we welcome Oracle to the oVirt community. oVirt is the open source component that enables management of the Linux Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM), the hypervisor for virtualized environments running on the Linux kernel.

At Red Hat, we believe that upstream collaboration drives innovation, even among competitors. To this end, Red Hat has a 10+ year tenure of thought leadership, contributions and collaboration in the oVirt and KVM communities. Our development and release processes are designed to ensure that Red Hat contributions to these communities are pushed upstream so the benefits gained from our efforts are available to the community at large and available for any and all to draw from.

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Also: IBM-Powered Supercomputers Lead Semi-Annual Rankings

Server: Red Hat, CentOS 8, Linux On ARM Servers and IBM

Filed under
Server
  • Why Chefs Collaborate in the Kitchen

    In a large commercial kitchen, for example hotels or cafeterias, chefs collaborate to create the recipes and meals. Sure, there is more than enough work for one person, and tasks are divided into chopping, mixing, cleaning, garnishing; but the recipe is collaboratively created.

    Suppose one chef broke away and created his or her own recipe? How would the kitchen maintain standards, tastes and reputation? Developing software using open source principles follows a similar theory.

    [...]

    Red Hat is the second largest corporate contributor to the Linux kernel. This means Red Hat engineers and support staff are well versed and able to resolve customer issues involving the Linux kernel. Every application container includes part of the Linux distribution and relies on the Linux kernel, which is the center of the Linux Operating System.

  • CentOS 8 Status 17-June-2019

    Since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (on 07-May) we've been looking into the tools that we use to build CentOS Linux. We've chosen to use the Koji buildsystem for RPMs, paired with the Module Build Service for modules, delivered through a distribution called Mbox.

    Mbox allows us to run the Koji Hub (the central job orchestrator), and the Module Build Service in an instance of OKD that we maintain specifically for our buildsystem work. We have 2 instances of mbox; one for the primary architectures (x86_64, ppc64le, and aarch64), and one for the secondary architecture (armhfp). OKD lets us run those instances on the same hardware but in separate namespaces. The builder machines are separate from the OKD cluster, and connect back to the individual buildsystems that they're assigned to.

  • CentOS 8.0 Is Looking Like It's Still Some Weeks Out

    For those eager to see CentOS 8.0 as the community open-source rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0, progress is being made but it looks like the release is still some weeks out.

    There's been the Wiki page detailing the state of affairs for CentOS 8.0. New today is a blog post summing up the current status. Progress is being made both on building the traditional RHEL8 RPM packages as well as the newer modules/streams. Koji is being used to build the RPMs while the Module Build Service with Mbox is handling the modules.

  • NVIDIA Brings CUDA to Arm, Enabling New Path to Exascale Supercomputing

    International Supercomputing Conference -- NVIDIA today announced its support for Arm CPUs, providing the high performance computing industry a new path to build extremely energy-efficient, AI-enabled exascale supercomputers.

  • NVIDIA Delivering CUDA To Linux On Arm For HPC/Servers

    NVIDIA announced this morning for ISC 2019 that they are bringing CUDA to Arm beyond their work already for supporting GPU computing with lower-power Tegra SoCs.

  • Nvidia pushes ARM supercomputing

    Graphics chip maker Nvidia is best known for consumer computing, vying with AMD's Radeon line for framerates and eye candy. But the venerable giant hasn't ignored the rise of GPU-powered applications that have little or nothing to do with gaming. In the early 2000s, UNC researcher Mark Harris began work popularizing the term "GPGPU," referencing the use of Graphics Processing Units for non-graphics-related tasks. But most of us didn't really become aware of the non-graphics-related possibilities until GPU-powered bitcoin-mining code was released in 2010, and shortly thereafter, strange boxes packed nearly solid with high-end gaming cards started popping up everywhere.

  • At ISC: DDN Launches EXA5 for AI, Big Data, HPC Workloads
  • IBM Makes Takes Another Big Step To Hybrid Computing

    Today, IBM announced the ability to leverage its unique turnkey operating environment, IBM i, and its AIX UNIX operating systems on IBM Cloud. Both OSs debuted in the 1980s and have a long history with many IBM customers. In addition, IBM i remains one of the most automated, fully integrated, and low-maintenance operating environments. Extending both OSs to IBM Cloud will allow customers to expand their resources on-demand, to migrate to the cloud, to leverage the latest Power9 servers, and to leverage IBM’s extensive resources. IBM is rolling out the service first in North America for customers using IBM i or AIX on Power servers. In conjunction with the extension of the hybrid cloud platform, IBM also announced a program to validate business partners with Power Systems expertise.

CERN Is Working To Move Further Away From Microsoft Due To License Costs Going Up By 10x

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GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft

CERN, The European Organization for Nuclear Research that is home to the Large Hadron Collider and a lot of other experiments, is experimenting with moving further away from Microsoft products. Due to Microsoft license fee increases affecting their work in the research laboratory and its budget, they established the Microsoft Alternatives "MAlt" project.

CERN had already long been involved with developing Scientific Linux (now shifting to CentOS) but they have still been reliant upon Microsoft products in other areas, on some Windows systems as well as using the likes of Skype for Business.

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Also today: Ubuntu preinstalled by Lenovo.

Ubuntu Server development summary – 11 June 2019

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Server
BSD
Ubuntu

The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list or visit the Ubuntu Server discourse hub for more discussion.

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Also: DragonFlyBSD 5.6 RC1 Released With VM Optimizations, HAMMER2 By Default

Data: NGD, Sisense and More

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Server
  • NGD ships 8TB M.2 SSD with in-situ data processing

    In this case the processor is an ARM Cortex-A53 core running a 64-bit operating system, a version of Ubuntu Linux. This should enable the development of applications that run on the embedded core with minimal changes from code running on an X86 Linux system.

  • Sisense Brings Power to the Builders With New Cloud-Native Linux Platform, Insights to Everyone With Predictive AI Technology

    Sisense, the world's leading modern platform for analytics builders, kicked off its second annual customer conference, Sisense Eureka!, with a series of product innovations designed to help developers, data scientists and business analysts simplify complex data and provide insights to everyone across a business.

  • Future Kubernetes Will Mimic What Facebook Already Does

     

    And just to be clear, Chunqiang Tang, an engineering manager at Facebook who works on Tupperware and who was previously in charge of cloud automation research at IBM’s TJ Watson Research Center, tells The Next Platform that Facebook has no plans to take its learnings from Tupperware and then apply them and converge onto Kubernetes, as Google might someday do if it can. (Already, there are lots of Google services that run atop Kubernetes on Google Cloud Platform instead of on Borg/Omega on bare metal.)
     

    While Facebook has no current plans to open source the Delos low-latency, pluggable API data store that is being used with Tupperware, Jason Flinn, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan who worked on the Delos project with Facebook, hinted that this project started only a year ago and has only been used in production for about four months, so it is early in the cycle to be opening it up, even if it is a possibility in the long term.

Servers Closing Down (MariaDB and IBM)

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Server
  • MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 Now Available, Pulumi Announces Pulumi Crosswalk for AWS, KDE Launches Plasma 5.16, IBM Announces Its List of Women Pioneers for AI in Business and Microway Provides Clemson University with an NVIDIA DGX-2 Supercomputer

    MariaDB today announces the release of MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4, "code-named 'Restful Nights' for the peace of mind it brings enterprise customers". The press release notes that this version "is a new, hardened and secured Server (different from MariaDB Community Server aka MariaDB Server) and has never been available before. MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 includes features not available in the community version that are focused on solving enterprise customer needs, providing them with greater reliability, stability and long-term support in production environments."

  • MariaDB opens up on locked down Enterprise Server

    MariaDB finally took the wraps off its Enterprise Server product today, which it said was aimed at massive deployments where scale and security are more important than rushing out new features for developers.

    The product was first flagged up back in February, and scheduled to appear in “spring”. We’ll leave it to you to check your calendar and decide whether it hit its deadline.

    “It’s one thing to experiment with open source, to evaluate it,” said MariaDB’s senior director of product marketing Shane Johsnon. “But once you move to the stage where you’re migrating mission critical applications to it, or you’re deploying it at massive scale you encounter new types of challenges, not necessarily functional challenges.”

    So, security in MariaDB Enterprise Server 10.4 has been boosted, with end-to-end encryption for multi-master clusters. At the same time, the company has clamped down on plugins, with only those deemed tested and production-ready permitted.

    [...]

    MariaDB ES will be GPL, said Johnson, “It’s the community version that gets GA’d with additional QA and additional plugins. The result of that is Enterprise Server.”

  • Server Buying Cools, But It's Cool – Don't Panic

    When a market is comprised of hundreds of thousands of customers, things tend to level out and are a lot more predictable than when there are relatively few customers. Before the public clouds took off a decade ago and before the hyperscalers created such large infrastructures to support billions of users running their applications, server buying was a lot smaller and it was also more predictable. Things tended to grow slowly, methodically and they also took time to slow down because not everyone felt an economic decline or a transition to a new system architecture at the same time.

    That is no longer so with the modern server business. Enterprises are offloading some of their compute needs to the public clouds, and in other cases they are employing services provided by the hyperscalers – email, collaboration, and so on – instead of hosting them in their own datacenters. The hyperscalers and cloud builders are at the front of the line ahead of any new server chip generation, and they tend to buy aggressively ahead of the formal launches by Intel and AMD, and if the most recent quarter is any test, they are slowing down server purchases as they await the right time to invest in future chips from those two companies.

  • IBM i Roadmap Promises A Long Ride, Few Bumps

    It would be hard to find a group of enterprise IT shops that are more conservative – meaning averse to risk – than the IBM midrange. Arguably, IBM System z mainframe shops are even more risk averse, but perhaps it is a matter more of scale than degree. In the average IBM i shop, one person – or maybe a handful of people – is keeping risk at bay, while in a mainframe shop there could be dozens or hundreds that are trying to steer the ship without rocking the boat.

    Every now and then, Big Blue publishes an IBM i Strategy And Roadmap document to trying to calm the fears of the IBM i faithful while at the same time trying to fire them up a little. It is a delicate balance, and such documents are generally not full of information. But there are always some things to consider and that can be used to make the ongoing case that the IBM i platform deserves to be preserved in the enterprise and to have continuing investment. So it is with the 2019 edition of the IBM i Strategy And Roadmap, which you can get at this link.

Why containers and Kubernetes have the potential to run almost anything

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Server

The future of Kubernetes is bright, and like virtualization before it, workload expansion is inevitable. Learning how to drive Kubernetes is probably the biggest investment that a developer or sysadmin can make in their own career growth. As the workloads expand, so will the career opportunities. So, here's to driving an amazing dump truck that's very elegant at moving dirt...

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Programming Leftovers

  • Intel Is Working On A New ‘Data Parallel C++’ Programming Language

    ntel has been working on its OneAPI project for quite some time. The company has now shared more details of the software project — including the launch of a new programming language called “Data Parallel C++ (DPC++).”

  • 6 Best Data Science and Machine Learning Courses for Beginners

    Many programmers are moving towards data science and machine learning hoping for better pay and career opportunities --- and there is a reason for it. The Data scientist has been ranked the number one job on Glassdoor for last a couple of years and the average salary of a data scientist is over** $120,000** in the United States according to Indeed. Data science is not only a rewarding career in terms of money but it also provides the opportunity for you to solve some of the world's most interesting problems. IMHO, that's the main motivation many good programmers are moving towards data science, machine learning and artificial intelligence.

  • Find the smallest number within a list with python

    In this example, we will create a python function which will take in a list of numbers and then return the smallest value. The solution to this problem is first to create a place holder for the first number within the list, then compares that number with other numbers within the same list in the loop. If the program found a number which is smaller than the one in the place holder, then the smaller number will be assigned to that place holder.

  • Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

    To be useful, a program usually needs to communicate with the outside world by obtaining input data from the user and displaying result data back to the user. This tutorial will introduce you to Python input and output. Input may come directly from the user via the keyboard, or from some external source like a file or database. Output can be displayed directly to the console or IDE, to the screen via a Graphical User Interface (GUI), or again to an external source.

  • Want to level up your Python? Join Weekly Python Exercise, starting July 2nd

    Let’s face it: Stack Overflow has made developers’ lives easier. Almost every time I have a question, I find that someone on Stack Overflow has asked it, and that people have answered it, often in great detail. I’m thus not against Stack Overflow, not by a long shot. But I have found that many Python developers visit there 10 or even 20 times a day, to find answers (and even code) that they can use to solve their problems.

  • Introducing pytest-elk-reporter

    Few years back I’ve wrote a post about how I’ve connected python based test to ELK setup - “ELK is fun”, it was using an xunit xml, parsing it and sending it via Logstash. Over time I’ve learn a lot about ElasticSearch and it’s friend Kibana, using them as a tool to handle logs. and also as a backend for a search component on my previous job. So now I know logstash isn’t needed for reporting test result, posting straight into elasticsearch is easier and gives you better control, ES is doing anything “automagiclly” anyhow nowadays.

Graphics: Weston 6.0.1, GPUs in OpenStack, Panfrost and Vulkan

  • weston 6.0.1
    Weston 6.0.1 is released with build system fixes to smooth the
    transition to Meson. Other miscellaneous bugfixes are also included.
    
    Note that the PGP signing key has changed to 0FDE7BE0E88F5E48.
    
    - (1):
          zunitc: Fix undeclared identifier 'NULL'
    
    Alexandros Frantzis (1):
          clients/simple-dmabuf-egl: Properly check for error in gbm_bo_get_handle_for_plane
    
    Antonio Borneo (2):
          clients: close unused keymap fd
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          weston: Properly test for output-creation failure
          compositor: Don't ignore --use-pixman for Wayland backend
    
    Fabrice Fontaine (1):
          Fix build with kernel < 4.4
    
    Harish Krupo (4):
          meson.build: Fix warning for configure_file
          window.c: Don't assume registry advertisement order
          data-device: send INVALID_FINISH when operation != dnd
          Fix: clients/window: Premature finish request when copy-pasting
    
    Kamal Pandey (1):
          FIX: weston: clients: typo in simple-dmabuf-egl.c
    
    Luca Weiss (1):
          Fix incorrect include
    
    Marius Vlad (3):
          meson.build/libweston: Fix clang warning for export-dynamic
          compositor: Fix invalid view numbering in scene-graph
          compositor: Fix missing new line when displaying buffer type for EGL buffer
    
    Pekka Paalanen (7):
          meson: link editor with gobject-2.0
          meson: link cms-colord with glib and gobject
          meson: link remoting with glib and gobject
          meson: DRM-backend demands GBM
          meson: dep fix for compositor.h needing xkbcommon.h
          build: add missing dep to x11 backend
          libweston: fix protocol install path
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          compositor: Fix incorrect use of bool options
    
    Sebastian Wick (1):
          weston-terminal: Fix weston-terminal crash on mutter
    
    Silva Alejandro Ismael (1):
          compositor: fix segfaults if wl_display_create fails
    
    Simon Ser (1):
          build: bump to version 6.0.1 for the point release
    
    Tomohito Esaki (1):
          cairo-util: Don't set title string to Pango layout if the title is NULL
    
    git tag: 6.0.1
    
  • Wayland's Weston 6.0.1 Released With Build System Fixes & Other Corrections

    Weston 6.0 was released back in March with a remote/streaming plug-in and Meson becoming the preferred build system among other improvements. Weston 6.0.1 was released today by Simon Ser with various fixes to this reference Wayland compositor. Weston 6.0.1 is mostly made up of Meson build system fixes/improvements to ensure a good Meson experience. There is also a fix for building with pre-4.4 kernels and a variety of other smaller fixes.

  • OpenStack Stein feature highlights: vGPU support coming in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15

    Red Hat is working on the next release of the supported enterprise distribution of OpenStack, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, based on the Stein community release. In this multi-part blog series, we’ll be examining some of the features that Red Hat and the open source community have collaborated on–starting with a look to future workloads, such as artificial intelligence. "How does OpenStack enable next generation workloads?" you ask. When it comes to computer-driven decision making, machine learning algorithms can provide adaptable services that can get better over time. Some of these workloads, such as facial recognition, require GPUs to ingest and process graphical data in real time. But the more powerful GPUs often used for machine learning and such are expensive, power-hungry, and can take up a lot of room in the servers' chassis. When working with GPUs at scale, optimized utilization is key to more cost effective machine learning.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Picks Up Yet More Features Thanks To Collabora's Summer Internship

    Just a few days ago I wrote how the Panfrost Gallium3D driver continues making incredible progress for this community-driven, open-source graphics driver targeting Arm Bifrost/Midgard graphics. There's yet another batch of new features and improvements to talk about. Most of this feature work continues to be done by Panfrost lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig who is interning at Collabora this summer and appears to be spending most of her time working on this reverse-engineered Arm graphics driver supporting their recent generations of IP.

  • Vulkan 1.1.112 Released While Open-Source ANV + RADV Drivers Continue Marching Along

    Vulkan 1.1.112 was outed this morning as the newest documentation update to this high performance graphics and compute API. Vulkan 1.1.112 is quite a mundane update with just documentation corrections and clarifications this go around and not any new extensions. But at least the clarifications should help out some and other maintenance items addressed by this Vulkan 1.1.112 release. It's not a surprise the release is so small considering Vulkan 1.1.111 was issued just two weeks ago.

today's howtos

5 Best and Free Desktop Email Clients for Linux and Windows

If you are looking for free Email clients for Linux and Windows – here are 5 of them we list which you can try and consider for casual or professional uses. Web based email is popular today which can be accessed via browser or mobile apps. However, big and medium enterprises, generic users still prefers native desktop email clients for heavy and office uses. Microsoft Outlook is the most popular desktop email client which is of course not free and you have to pay huge licence fee to use. There are multiple options for free desktop email clients available. Here are the best 5 free and open source email clients which you can go ahead and try then deploy for your needs. Read more