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Server: GNU/Linux on OpenPOWER and ARM64

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  • Inspur Unveils Open Source Software Adapted Server at OpenPOWER Summit 2018

    Inspur, a member of the OpenPOWER Foundation, showcased its FP5280G2 server based on OpenPOWER9 that has completed the adaptation of mainstream open source software for cloud computing, big data and AI. It was the first time that this product was introduced in North America. As the initiator of the OpenPOWER Foundation, IBM disclosed more details of POWER9 processors: designed for emerging applications such as AI, cloud computing, and big data, and has 50% to 200% performance improvement compared to POWER8.

  • Updated Oracle Linux 7 update 4 ARM64/aarch64 with uek5 4.14.26-2

    We refreshed the installation media for OL7/ARM64 with the latest uek5 preview build based on upstream stable 4.14.26 and added perf and tuned.

    You can download it from the OTN OL ARM webpage. Ignore the 4.14-14 in the text, that will get updated. We're also working on updating the Raspberry Pi 3 image to match the same version. Hopefully using grub2 there as well to make it easier to have a single image repo.

  • Oracle Linux 7 For ARM64 Updated, Using Linux 4.14 Kernel

    Oracle has made available updated installation media for Oracle Linux 7 for ARM64.

    With Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 5 they are using the Linux 4.14 LTS base and that includes for this 64-bit ARM support too. Oracle has made available Oracle Linux 7 for 64-bit ARM with an "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 5" based on the upstream Linux 4.14.26 kernel.

Server: Containers, Kubernetes, Varnish 6.0, HHVM 3.25.0, 3.24.4, and 3.21.8

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  • Container Isolation Gone Wrong

    One of the main advantages of embracing containers is "lightweight virtualization." Since each container is just a thin layer around the containerized processes, the user gains enormous efficiencies, for example by increasing the container density per host, or by spinning containers up and down at a very fast pace.

    However, as the troubleshooting story in the article will show, this lightweight virtualization comes at the cost of sharing the underlying kernel among all containers, and in some circumstances, this can lead to surprising and undesirable effects that container users typically don't think about.

    This troubleshooting tale is rather involved. I've started from the basics and worked up to the more complex material in the hope that readers at all levels can get value out of it.

  • Introducing Agones: Open-source, multiplayer, dedicated game-server hosting built on Kubernetes

    In the world of distributed systems, hosting and scaling dedicated game servers for online, multiplayer games presents some unique challenges. And while the game development industry has created a myriad of proprietary solutions, Kubernetes has emerged as the de facto open-source, common standard for building complex workloads and distributed systems across multiple clouds and bare metal servers. So today, we’re excited to announce Agones (Greek for "contest" or "gathering"), a new open-source project that uses Kubernetes to host and scale dedicated game servers.

  • Varnish 6.0 Released

    It's that time of March again, and Varnish 6.0.0 is here.

  • HHVM 3.25.0, 3.24.4, and 3.21.8

    HHVM 3.25 is released! This release contains new features, bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places.

  • HHVM 3.25 Released, Now Defaults To PHP7 Mode

    Facebook developers working on the HHVM Hack/PHP language stack have released version 3.25 of the HipHop Virtual Machine.

    HHVM 3.25's PHP support now defaults to PHP7 rather than the PHP5 mode, which is now in an unsupported state. As expressed previously, Facebook will be focusing more on their Hack language support than PHP7 thanks to all the upstream improvements with PHP 7 especially on the performance front. But the large compatibility with PHP7 will happen to continue at least for the time being. With HHVM 3.25 includes support for PHP7 Throwable/Error/Exception hierarchy, changes to visibility modifiers, and other compatibility work.

Server: Kubernetes, Apache Cassandra, and OpenStack Queens

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  • Container orchestration top trumps: Let's just pretend you don't use Kubernetes already

    Container orchestration comes in different flavours, but actual effort must be put into identifying the system most palatable.

    Yes, features matter, but so too does the long-term viability of the platform. There's been plenty of great technologies in the history of the industry, but what's mattered has been their viability, as defined by factors such as who owns them, whether they are open source (and therefore sustained by a community), or outright M&A.

    CoreOS, recently bought by Red Hat, offered Fleet. Fleet, alas for Fleet users, was discontinued because Kubernetes "won".

  • 6 ways Apache Cassandra prepares you for a multi-cloud future

    The incentives for enterprises to pursue a multi-cloud deployment strategy—a cloud-agnostic infrastructure, greater resilience, the flexibility that comes from not being reliant on any single vendor, to name just a few—have never been more compelling, and they are constantly increasing. Yes, the technological feat of implementing and managing deployments that straddle multiple clouds comes with some challenges. But as the need for this future-ready architecture increases, Apache Cassandra is a uniquely primed open source database solution for enabling such deployments.

  • How Containers Work in OpenStack Queens

    There are many different ways in which containers are used and enabled throughout the open-source OpenStack cloud platform. With the OpenStack Queens platform, which was released on Feb. 28, there are even more options than ever before.

    OpenStack has been supporting containers for several years, beginning with the nova-docker driver in the OpenStack Nova compute project that has now been deprecated. Among the different OpenStack container efforts in 2018 are Zun, Magnum, Kuryr, Kolla, LOCI, OpenStack-Helm and Kata containers.

  • The cost of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

Servers/Containers: Kubernetes, Former Docker CEO, and Linux Foundation Boosting Microsoft

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Server: Supercomputing, Kubernetes and More

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  • Supercomputing under a new lens: A Sandia-developed benchmark re-ranks top computers

    A Sandia National Laboratories software program now installed as an additional test for the widely observed TOP500 supercomputer challenge has become increasingly prominent. The program’s full name — High Performance Conjugate Gradients, or HPCG — doesn’t come trippingly to the tongue, but word is seeping out that this relatively new benchmarking program is becoming as valuable as its venerable partner — the High Performance LINPACK program — which some say has become less than satisfactory in measuring many of today’s computational challenges.

  • Bright Computing adds support for OpenHPC

    Today Bright Computing announced it has joined the Linux Foundation and will participate in the OpenHPC Community project. The latest release of Bright Cluster Manager provides the ability for Bright customers to easily integrate OpenHPC libraries and packages for use within a Bright cluster.

  • Kubernetes Becomes The First Project To Graduate From The Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Usenet, Authentication, and Engineering (or: Early Design Decisions for Usenet)

    A Twitter thread on trolls brought up mention of trolls on Usenet. The reason they were so hard to deal with, even then, has some lessons for today; besides, the history is interesting. (Aside: this is, I think, the first longish thing I've ever written about any of the early design decisions for Usenet. I should note that this is entirely my writing, and memory can play many tricks across nearly 40 years.)

  • The true costs of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

  • Memcached DDoS Attacks Slow Down as Patching Ramps Up

    Days after the largest distributed denial-of-service attack in internet history, the attack size of memcached DDoS attacks is now on the decline.

    On March 5, Netscout Arbor Networks reported a 1.7-Tbps DDoS attack that was driven by the amplification of misconfigured memcached servers. While there were some initial fears that the attacks would continue to grow in size, the opposite has happened.

    "We're still seeing lots of them, but their average size is considerably smaller due to ongoing cleanup and mitigation efforts," Steinthor Bjarnason, senior network security analyst at Netscout Arbor, told eWEEK.

Kubernetes News

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  • Kubernetes Graduates CNCF Incubator, Debuts New Sandbox

    Though the Kubernetes container orchestration system has been widely deployed at scale in production around the world, it wasn't until March 6 that the project graduated from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's (CNCF) incubator.

    The CNCF's process brings projects in as incubated projects and then aims to move them through to graduation, which implies a level of process and technology maturity. Kubernetes was the founding project for the CNCF, which was launched back in July 2015.

    Google contributed Kubernetes to the CNCF in an effort to help build a more diverse community of contributors and to spur adoption.

  • Kubernetes Ingress: NodePort, Load Balancers, and Ingress Controllers

    A fundamental requirement for cloud applications is some way to expose that application to your end users. This article will introduce the three general strategies in Kubernetes for exposing your application to your end users, and cover the various tradeoffs of each approach. I’ll then explore some of the more sophisticated requirements of an ingress strategy. Finally, I’ll give some guidelines on how to pick your Kubernetes ingress strategy.

  • Aqua Expands Container Security Platform With MicroEnforcer

    Aqua Security launched version 3.0 of its namesake container security platform on March 7, refocusing the product on providing Kubernetes cloud-native enterprise security controls.

    Aqua originally focused on just Docker container deployments, but with the new 3.0 update it is providing a series of capabilities that are aligned with Kubernetes deployments. Kubernetes provides container orchestration capabilities and has also been embraced by Docker Inc., which now also integrates Kubernetes as an option for its users.

    Looking beyond just Kubernetes, Aqua 3.0 also has a new capability called the MicroEnforcer, which is aimed at emerging forms of lightweight container deployments, such as the AWS Fargate service.

  • You got your VM in my container

    Containers and Kubernetes have been widely promoted as "disruptive" technologies that will replace everything that preceded them, most notably virtual machine (VM) management platforms such as vSphere and OpenStack. Instead, as with most platform innovations, Kubernetes is more often used to add a layer to (or complement) VMs. In this article, and in a presentation at SCALE16x, we'll be exploring two relatively new projects that aim to assist users in combining Kubernetes with virtualization: KubeVirt and Kata Containers.

    Most organizations still have large existing investments in applications that run on virtualized hosts, infrastructure that runs them, and tools to manage them. We can envision this being true for a long time to come, just as remnants of previous generations of technology remain in place now. Additionally, VM technology still offers a level of isolation that container-enablement features, like user namespaces, have yet to meet. However, those same organizations want the ease-of-use, scalability, and developer appeal of Kubernetes, as well as a way to gradually transition from virtualized workloads to containerized ones.

​Kubernetes graduates to full-pledged, open-source program

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At the Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS), the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which sustains and integrates open-source, cloud native technologies such as Prometheus and containerd, and Chen Goldberg, Google Cloud's director of engineering, announced that Kubernetes is the first project to graduate from the CNCF.

That may sounds a little odd since Kubernetes is already the dominant cloud container orchestration program. But, for the CNCF, graduation has a particular meaning. To graduate, a project must must show it has been adopted by multiple organizations, have a documented, structured governance process, and show a strong commitment to community success and inclusivity.

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Also: Microservices 101

PostgreSQL 10: a Great New Version for a Great Database

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PostgreSQL has long claimed to be the most advanced open-source relational database. For those of us who have been using it for a significant amount of time, there's no doubt that this is true; PostgreSQL has consistently demonstrated its ability to handle high loads and complex queries while providing a rich set of features and rock-solid stability.

But for all of the amazing functionality that PostgreSQL offers, there have long been gaps and holes. I've been in meetings with consulting clients who currently use Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server and are thinking about using PostgreSQL, who ask me about topics like partitioning or query parallelization. And for years, I've been forced to say to them, "Um, that's true. PostgreSQL's functionality in that area is still fairly weak."

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Late Coverage of OpenStack Queens

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  • New OpenStack Queens release provides support for GPUs, containers to meet edge, NFV and machine learning workload demands

    The OpenStack community released on Wednesday Queens, the 17th version of the open source cloud infrastructure software. A packed release resulting from a six-month development cycle, Queens offers advancements benefiting for both enterprises with mission-critical workloads as well as organizations investing in emerging use cases like containers, NFV, edge computing and machine learning. The software now powers 60 public cloud data centers and thousands of private clouds at a scale of more than six million physical cores.

  • OpenStack Queens, RedDrop Android Spyware, Oracle's VirtualBox and More

    OpenStack Queens was released yesterday. The 17th version of the open-source cloud infrastructure software "offers a packed release with advancements benefiting not only enterprises with mission-critical workloads but also organizations investing in emerging use cases like containers, NFV, edge computing and machine learning".

  • ​Open-source cloud royalty: OpenStack Queens released

    The cloud is growing faster than ever, and OpenStack, the open-source cloud for the enterprise, is growing with it.

    By next year, 60 percent of enterprise workloads will run in the cloud, according to 451 Research's Voice of the Enterprise: Cloud Transformation, Workloads and Key Projects survey. While much of that growth is in the public cloud, OpenStack enterprise adoption is expanding, with enterprises in nearly all businesses turning to private and hybrid cloud models for their mission-critical workloads. Indeed, as OpenStack moves toward making more than $6 billion in 2021, OpenStack's private clouds are expected to deliver more revenue than its public cloud implementations.

OpenStack’s Latest Release

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65
    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.
  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours
    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.
  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018
    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.
  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03
    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user. Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.
  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host
    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.
  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.
  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

Kernel and Graphics: Torvalds, Linux Foundation, Nouveau and libinput

  • Which Linux Distribution Does Linus Torvalds Use in 2018?
    We know a sizeable amount of his views on Linux distros, thanks to an interview he took long ago in 2007, but who knows – could he have changed his mind? In a 2007 interview, Linus professed that he didn’t use Debian because he found it hard to install, a statement I find interesting because he’s the guy who wrote GIT in C. Anyway, he buttressed his reason for not using Debian in a later interview from 2014, when he explained that because he is responsible for maintaining his computer and all the computers used by his household, he likes to use an OS with virtually no installation hassle. [...] As far as I know, he uses Fedora on most of his computers because of its fairly good support for PowerPC. He mentioned that he used OpenSuse at one point in time and complimented Ubuntu for making Debian accessible to the mass. So most of the flak on the internet about Linus disliking Ubuntu isn’t factual.
  • Linux Foundation, Intel launch open source IoT hypervisor
    The Linux Foundation has unveiled plans for a new open source project to provide streamlined embedded hypervisors for IoT devices. Called Acrn, the project has been assisted by Intel, which contributed code and engineering. The main thrust of the project is to create small, flexible virtual machines. ACRN comprises two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with I/O mediators. The Linux-based hypervisor can run many ‘guest’ operating systems at the same time.
  • Nouveau NIR Support Appears Almost Baked, NV50 Support Added
    Karol Herbst at Red Hat started off this week by publishing his latest patches around Nouveau NIR support as part of the company's effort for getting SPIR-V/compute support up and running on this open-source NVIDIA driver. Red Hat's grand vision around open-source GPGPU compute still isn't entirely clear especially with Nouveau re-clocking not being suitable for delivering high performance at this point, but it must be grand given the number of developers they have working on improving the Linux GPU compute stack at the moment.
  • xf86-input-libinput 0.27.0 Released
    Aside from a few touchpad issues and other minor random issues with select hardware, libinput these days is mostly in great shape for being a generic input handling library that is working out well for both X.Org and Wayland users.

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.