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Prometheus Milestone

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Microservices and Microsoft Screwing With Kubernetes

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Microsoft
  • 3 tips for moving your team to a microservices architecture

    Microservices are gaining in popularity and providing new ways for tech companies to improve their services for end users. But what impact does the shift to microservices have on team culture and morale? What issues should CTOs, developers, and project managers consider when the best technological choice is a move to microservices?

    Below you’ll find key advice and insight from CTOs and project leads as they reflect on their experiences with team culture and microservices.

  • Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service mucked my cluster!

    Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) was launched to world+dog in June, however, a few disgruntled customers say the managed container confection isn't fully baked yet.

    In a blog post published on Monday, Prashant Deva, creator of an app and infrastructure monitoring service called DripStat, savaged AKS, calling it "an alpha service marked as GA [generally available] by Microsoft."

    Deva said he moved his company's production workload to AKS last month, and has been plagued by random DNS failures for domains outside of Azure and hostnames inside the Azure Virtual Network.

    He characterized the response from Microsoft support – advice not to use excessive memory and CPU resources – as ridiculous, and said Microsoft failed to respond when told the DNS issues occurred mainly during application startup when memory and CPU usage is minimal.

Server: Kontron, D-R, Istio, 'Serverless', BeeGFS

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Server
  • Kontron Acquires Inocybe Technologies to Boost Cloud Native Networking Stack

    Kontron announced on Aug. 1 that it is acquiring privately-held networking vendor Inocybe Technologies. Financial terms of the deal have not been publicly disclosed.

    Inocybe is well known in the open source networking community for its support and contributions, particularly to the OpenDayLight (ODL) Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller. Inocybe has also been a leading contributor to the OpenSwitch project as well.

  • How to Lead a Disaster Recovery Exercise For Your On-Call Team

    On-call teams at startups have three big problems: they’re small, they cover a wide breadth of infrastructure, and the last two points usually imply that they lack the bandwidth to maintain and write documentation for a suite of DevOps tools. At SigOpt, our on-call team tackles these challenges with a biannual “disaster recovery exercise”, or simulated outage.

    In this blog post I will show you what a disaster recovery exercise is, how it can diagnose weak points in your infrastructure, and how it can be a learning experience for your on-call team. I hope that by the end you’ll consider running a disaster recovery exercise for your on-call team!

  • Istio Service Mesh Advances to Production

    Istio, the “service mesh” intended to connect application components and thereby boost the capabilities of the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator, has advanced over the past year as a way of managing increasingly popular micro-services.

    Partners Google Cloud, IBM (NYSE: IBM), ride sharer Lyft and Red Hat’s CoreOS unit along with other open source developers announced the 1.0 release of Istio on Tuesday (July 31). Among the goals is simplifying enterprise deployment of micro-services and allowing developers to add, change and route them within cloud-native applications. This, proponents said, can be done without having to update code or rebuild the underlying application containers.

  • Meet Serverless Inc. - The Startup That Aims To Accelerate Serverless Computing
  • Google advances Istio – this could be bigger than Kubernetes and serverless

    As modern digital computing infrastructure continues to evolve, new layers of automation enable increasingly rapid change and adaptation. Once containerization had made it possible to deploy new capabilities in seconds, then the advent of Kubernetes and similar tools added a layer of orchestration to co-ordinate container deployments at scale. A by-product was the easy abstraction of functions into a ‘serverless’ model, where the service was just there, on demand, in the infrastructure. Now a new layer known as the ‘service mesh’ is coming into being to add governance, management and communication across all of these capabilities. This week saw the release of version 1.0 of a new open source framework for service mesh known as Istio, backed, like Kubernetes before it, by Google, along with IBM.

  • Advanced HPC Announces Its Exclusive Platinum Partnership with BeeGFS

    Christopher M. Sullivan is the Assistant Director for Biocomputing at Oregon State University and directs the Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing (CGRB). He says BeeGFS has given CGRB a way to distribute their research across a parallel system while keeping the storage space looking like a single container. “BeeGFS is a robust solution that expands our storage space, gives us higher performance with phenomenal management and all at a cost-effective price.”

Docker 18.06 CE Debuts Alongside New Release Cadence

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Software

While new Docker CE versions are set to debut every six months, Docker has pledged to support each new CE release for seven months.

While Docker CE Stable is moving to a longer release cycle, the Docker CE Edge release is now moving to faster cycle. Docker CE Edge editions which were previously released on a monthly basis. The Edge release is now being replaced with a new Nightly build of Docker.

"Nightly builds are created once per day from the master branch." Docker's release documentation states. "These builds allow for testing from the latest code on the master branch. No qualifications or guarantees are made for the nightly build."

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PostgreSQL and patents

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OSS

Patents and open-source projects are always a messy combination it seems. A recent discussion on the pgsql-hackers mailing list highlights some of the problems that can result even when a patent holder wants to make their patents available to a project like PostgreSQL. Software patents are a minefield in many ways—often projects want to just avoid the problems entirely by staying completely away from code known to be covered by patents.

It started with a post from Takayuki Tsunakawa, who wondered how his employer, Fujitsu, could submit patches to PostgreSQL that implement various patented (and patent applied-for) techniques: "we'd like to offer our company's patents and patent applications license to the PostgreSQL community free of charge". He suggested three possibilities for how that might be accomplished: by way of a patent pool such as the one run by the Open Invention Network, doing an explicit patent grant (such as that in section 3 in the Apache v2 license), or by a patent promise like Red Hat's, but only for PostgreSQL.

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Istio 1.0 and Red Hat News/Articles

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Red Hat
Server
  • Istio v1.0 Service Mesh Released with Features “Ready for Production Use”

    At the Google Cloud Next 2018 event, held in San Francisco last week, the release schedule of the Istio v1.0 service mesh was announced. This week has seen the formal v1.0 release of the open platform that aims to make it easy to "create a network of deployed services with load balancing, service-to-service authentication, monitoring, and more, without any changes in service code". Key new features include cross-cluster mesh support, fine-grained traffic flow control, and the ability to incrementally roll out mutual TLS across a mesh.

  • Google, IBM, RedHat and others launch Istio 1.0 service mesh for microservices

    Istio, an open-source platform that connects, manages and secures microservices announced its version 1.0. Istio provides service mesh for microservices from Google, IBM, Lyft, Red Hat, and other collaborators from the open-source community.

  • Red Hat Releases Istio 1.0 – Already in Use by HP and eBay

    Google Cloud already offering a managed Istio service

    It has been in development for two years and has already been seen in the wild, but this week Version 1.0 of Red Hat’s “Istio” was officially launched.

    Istio is an open source microservices management tool, designed to handle load balancing, flow control, routing and the essential security needs of businesses that use microservices. It can handle service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry across apps running on multiple Kubernetes hosts.

  • Google releases universal plumbing for containers

    Google today released version 1.0 of Istio, a “service mesh” designed to make it easier to adopt containers and microservices.

    Istio does so by offering a layer that does jobs like collecting logs, traces and telemetry, authentication and network policy. Any application needs those services and monolithic applications often include them.

    But microservices are designed to orchestrate lots of small single-purpose code chunks into useful applications. It would be wasteful and/or super-complex to build those services into each component of a microservice and doing so would not reduce complexity.

    Enter Istio, which offers itself as the layer to do all the plumbing, regardless of the function or code used in a microservice.

  • Red Hat Ansible Engine 2.6 enhances network capabilities

    Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Ansible Engine 2.6, the latest release of its agentless open source IT automation solution. Red Hat Ansible Engine 2.6 adds new content for automating across hybrid and multi-cloud environments, along with simplified connections to network APIs and updates for Ansible deployments overseeing Windows environments, according to the firm.

  • Survey finds open source tools are the leader for developing IoT solutions

    From refrigerators to doorbells, any device with power can be made intelligent and every day, millions of new connected devices are entering the market. According to IDC, worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) spending is projected to surpass $1 trillion in 2020, with a forecast compound annual growth of over 14% over the next several years. With the development of IoT solutions rapidly accelerating, enterprises are actively investing in technology and tools that can develop, deploy and manage these IoT products and services.

  • 6 DevOps mistakes to avoid

    As DevOps is increasingly recognized as a pillar of digital transformation, CIOs are becoming more enthusiastic about how DevOps and open source can transform enterprise culture. DevOps refers to a group of concepts that, while not all new, have catalyzed into a movement that is rapidly spreading throughout the technical community. Just look at the number of books and resources that are available to help you take your DevOps initiatives and practices to the next level.

    Still, many people don't fully understand what DevOps means. And without the right knowledge and understanding, many DevOps initiatives fail to get off the ground. Here are six common mistakes—and how to avoid them—as you start your DevOps journey.

  • DevOps Platform Market Report 2023 – Puppet Labs, Chef, Docker Inc., Red Hat (Ansible)

The Search for a GUI Docker

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I love Docker. At first it seemed a bit silly to me for a small-scale implementation like my home setup, but after learning how to use it, I fell in love. The standard features are certainly beneficial. It's great not worrying that one application's dependencies will step on or conflict with another's. But most applications are good about playing well with others, and package management systems keep things in order. So why do I docker run instead of apt-get install? Individualized system settings.

With Docker, I can have three of the same apps running side by side. They even can use the same port (internally) and not conflict. My torrent client can live inside a forced-VPN network, and I don't need to worry that it will somehow "leak" my personal IP data. Heck, I can run apps that work only on CentOS inside my Ubuntu Docker server, and it just works! In short, Docker is amazing.

I just wish I could remember all the commands.

Don't get me wrong, I'm familiar with Docker. I use it for most of my server needs. It's my first go-to when testing a new app. Heck, I taught an entire course on Docker for CBT Nuggets (my day job). The problem is, Docker works so well, I rarely need to interact with it. So, my FIFO buffer fills up, and I forget the simple command-line options to make Docker work. Also, because I like charts and graphs, I decided to install a Docker GUI. It was a bit of an adventure, so I thought I'd share the ins and outs of my experience.

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​Container adoption speeds up to the detriment of VMs

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Ever since Docker arrived to make containers popular, companies have turned to containers. The inevitable result was virtual machines (VMs) began to decline.

According to Diamanti, a bare-metal container company in its 2018 Container Adoption Benchmark survey of 576 IT leaders, enterprises are using containers to save money by reducing their reliance on commercial virtualization technologies such as VMware's VM. The report examines the current state of container adoption, evaluates container "stack" technology choices, examines containers' impact on VM infrastructure, and finds high levels of enterprise dissatisfaction with VM licensing fees.

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Also: How Spotify migrated everything from on-premise to Google Cloud Platform

Istio 1.0

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  • IBM & Google Launch 'Istio' Cloud Software, but Amazon & Microsoft Skip the Party

    Istio, an open source project backed by IBM, Google, Red Hat and others for connecting, managing and securing Kubernetes containers, hits version 1.0 Tuesday. But can Istio become ubiquitous without support from market leaders Amazon Web Services and Microsoft?

    Istio, also backed by Lyft Inc. and Pivotal , is a "service mesh," picking up where Kubernetes leaves off. Kubernetes provides orchestration to run multiple containers, manage their lifecycle, keep them available and scale them up and down as needed. Istio is software for managing how containers interact with each other.

  • The Istio service mesh hits version 1.0
  • What is Istio? The latest open source project out of Google
  • Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

    Red Hat is celebrating the 1.0 release of Istio, the open source microservices management project, and the arrival of version 3.10 of its OpenShift software container platform.

    Istio's 1.0 release received mention at Google Cloud Next last week, but the official bits are expected on Tuesday. The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.

  • IBM, Google, Red Hat push Istio to 1.0 release

    IBM launched Istio along with Google Cloud and Lyft a little more than a year ago. The goal of Istio is to give developers a vendor-neutral way to connect, secure and manage networks of various microservices.

    Managing microservices is a critical issue since enterprises are increasingly built on them. By breaking services and applications into smaller parts developers can be more agile. The issue is that managing various microservices requires a good bit of choreography.

The Dark Side of Containers: Protecting Container Data from Itself

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GNU
Linux
Server
Security

Containers are virtualized but not by hypervisors. They can be deployed to a VM but are not VMs.

Both containers and VMs use server/host OS as the bottom two layers of the stack. In VM environments, the next level is the hypervisor followed by VMs containing guest OS, libraries (div/lib in Linux), and applications. A single VM runs two full operating systems: the host and guest OS.

In contrast, containers do not have a hypervisor layer. A container shares the host OS, housing only the libraries and application code and data. Container benefits include greater portability, less operational overhead, lower OS licensing and maintenance/support costs, and less expensive application development.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Quirky Xerus 8.6, Snapcraft and More

  • Quirky Xerus 8.6 features latest DEBs from Ubuntu 16.04.x
    The independent Linux-based operating system, Quirky 8.6, a side project of Puppy Linux made with Woof, has just hit the market. According to an announcement by its creator, Barry Kauler, who retired from the Puppy Linux project to work on the Quirky Distro, the woofQ operating system is live for users to download and enjoy. The latest release mainly features bug fixes and minor improvements from previous Quirky OS 8.x versions. The release notes of Quirky’s Xerus version 8.6 explain that the update comes with a package upgrade to version 2.49.4 SeaMonkey and Kernel 4.14.63 with aufs patch. The new release is built with the latest DEBs from the Ubuntu 16.04.x range and features improvements for its EasyShare with specific improvements for Android connections. A Gxlat language translator has been introduced in this update and there are 10 architectural improvements and fixes as well. Several minor security bugs have also been patched since its predecessor.
  • Snapcraft at Europython 2018
    In July, several members of our advocacy and design teams went to Europython 2018 in Edinburgh. It was a really well-organised event, mixing great speakers from a vibrant community at a great location. The main reason for us to get closer to the Python developer community was to promote Snapcraft as the best way to publish on Linux, for app developers in general, and for Python developers in particular. As well as increasing awareness of Snapcraft, we gained a deeper understanding of the needs of Python developers and made contact with interesting products and engineers.
  • Cloud Native, Docker, K8s Summit
  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 Bionic Beaver Has Been Released (Download Links)

Graphics: Wayland/Weston, Mesa and AMD

  • Wayland 1.16 / Weston 5.0 RC2 Released To Fix Vulnerabilities
    Two release candidates of Wayland 1.16 / Weston 5.0 were not originally scheduled, but it's been necessitated due to some pressing issues both with Wayland and its reference compositor. Samsung's Derek Foreman issued these "RC2" releases on Friday rather than going straight to the official Wayland 1.16 and Weston 5.0 releases. On the Wayland front, Michael Srb found and fixed issues that could cause pointer overflows within Wayland's connection code. These overflow fixes are the only changes in this Wayland 1.15.94 (RC2) version.
  • RAGE & Doom Get Radeon Workarounds In Mesa 18.3-dev
    If you are looking to enjoy id Software's RAGE or Doom VFR games this weekend on Linux via Wine, they should be playing nicer with the latest open-source Mesa graphics driver code. Timothy Arceri at Valve has added a workaround to get RAGE working under Wine with RadeonSI. The workaround is a DRIRC configuration addition for allowing GLSL built-in variable redeclarations. This is enough to get RAGE working with RadeonSI on Mesa Git. Though only RadeonSI is working out currently since the game relies upon the OpenGL compatibility profile mode that is only supported currently by RadeonSI when it comes to the Mesa drivers. Thanks to Valve's developers and others, the OpenGL compatibility profile mode for RadeonSI has matured into great shape these past few months.
  • Adreno 600 Series Support Lands In Mesa 18.3 Gallium3D
    With the Adreno 600 series support going into Linux 4.19 for the kernel bits, the user-space OpenGL driver support for the latest-generation Qualcomm graphics has now been merged into Mesa. Kristian Høgsberg Kristensen of Google's Chrome OS graphics team (yes, Kristian of Wayland and DRI2 fame) has been working on the Gallium3D support for the Adreno 600 series hardware along with Freedreno founder Rob Clark. This A6xx support is being tacked onto the existing Freedreno Gallium3D driver and amounts to just over six thousand lines of new code. Keep in mind this A6xx Freedreno back-end must also be used with the supported MSM DRM driver in the Linux 4.19+ kernel.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Radeon Linux Driver Released with Support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    Featuring official support for the AMD Radeon PRO WX 8200 graphics cards and initial Wattman-like functionality, the Radeon Software for Linux 18.30 finally adds support for some of the most recent Ubuntu, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and CentOS Linux distributions. These include Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10, CentOS 7.5, and CentOS 6.10. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and Server (SLED/SLES) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 is supported as well, but not the latest SUSE Linux Enterprise 15.
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Update Fixes Witcher 3 Issue, Bug Fixes
    In addition to AMD releasing AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 on Friday, they also did their usual weekly source push of their newest "AMDVLK" open-source Radeon Vulkan driver code.

Kernel: Linux 4.19 Staging and Greg Kroah-Hartman's Very Many Stable Releases

  • Linux 4.19 Staging Brings EROFS File-System & Gasket Driver Framework
    Following the USB subsystem updates, Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in the kernel's staging area work for the Linux 4.19 merge window. This experimental/testing area of the Linux kernel is adding a new file-system with 4.19: EROFS. EROFS is developed by Huawei for possible Android device use-cases. EROFS stands for the Extendable Read-Only File-System and is developed to address shortcomings in other Linux read-only file-systems. EROFS features compression support and other features, but the on-disk layout format isn't 100% firm yet -- hence going into the staging area.
  • USB Patches Posted For Linux 4.19 Kernel, Including The New USB-C DisplayPort Driver
    Having wrapped up his latest stable kernel wrangling and the fallout from L1TF/Foreshadow, Greg Kroah-Hartman got around today to sending out the feature pull requests for the kernel subsystems he oversees. His first new batch of changes for Linux 4.19 today is the USB subsystem work.
  • One Week Past Linux 4.18.0, The Linux 4.18.3 Kernel Is Already Out
    Greg Kroah-Hartman had a fun Friday night issuing new point releases to the Linux 3.18 / 4.4 / 4.9 / 4.14 / 4.17 / 4.18 kernels only to have to issue new point releases minutes later. It was just on Thursday that Linux 4.18.1 was released along with updates to older stable branches for bringing L1TF / Foreshadow mitigation. Friday night then brought Linux 4.18.2, Linux 4.17.16, Linux 4.14.64, Linux 4.9.121, Linux 4.4.149, and Linux 3.18.119 with more patches. Those kernels brought various fixes, including in the x86 PTI code for clearing the global bit more aggressively, crypto fixes, and other maintenance work.

Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.5

  • 2018.08.18: Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.5 Released!
    The Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) development team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the new TDE R14.0.5 release. TDE is a complete software desktop environment designed for Unix-like operating systems, intended for computer users preferring a traditional desktop model, and is free/libre software. R14.0.5 is the fifth maintenance release of the R14.0 series, and is built on and improves the previous R14.0.4 version. Maintenance releases are intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability through the avoidance of both major new features and major codebase re-factoring.
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Lets You Keep Enjoying The KDE 3 Experience In 2018
    For those that have fond memories of the K Desktop Environment 3, you can still enjoy a KDE3-derived experience in 2018 with the just-released Trinity Desktop R14.0.5. Trinity Desktop continues to see occasional updates as the fork of the KDE 3.5 packages. Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 is the new release this weekend and their first since R14.0.4 was released last November.