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Docker security with SELinux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Security

This article is based on a talk I gave at DockerCon this year. It will discuss Docker container security, where we are currently, and where we are headed.

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Docker networking: How Linux containers will change your network

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Docker is making Linux containers a lightweight alternative to hypervisors; network engineers must be prepared. Find out what you need to know about Docker networking.

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The Linux Supercomputers We Secretly Fear Will Become Sentient

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Server

Every year, the Top 500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers is released. A list filled with machines containing tens of thousands of nodes and capable of cranking out enough petaflops per second to make your head spin.

And, of course, this list is absolutely dominated by machines powered by Linux.

This is awesome. But, really, we all know this. Let's dig a little deeper into these Goliath computers that will, someday, become sentient and rise up against their human creators.

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DESKTOP CONTAINERS – THE WAY FORWARD

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

One feature we are spending quite a bit of effort in around the Workstation is container technologies for the desktop. This has been on the wishlist for quite some time and luckily the pieces for it are now coming together. Thanks to strong collaboration between Red Hat and Docker we have a great baseline to start from. One of the core members of the desktop engineering team, Alex Larsson, has been leading the Docker integration effort inside Red Hat and we are now preparing to build onwards on that work, using the desktop container roadmap created by Lennary Poettering.

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X.Org Server 1.16 Delayed To Let In Non-PCI Graphics Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Server

X.Org Server 1.16 has been delayed. However, it's not been delayed like in some of the more notorious past releases due to outstanding bugs, etc, but over letting in a late feature to this latest revision of the X11 server.

There was a lot of developer interest and pressure to let non-PCI device support get merged for the 1.16 stable release. This non-PCI support is needed for allowing the NVIDIA Tegra (open-source) graphics driver to work properly in an easy manner since it's not exposed as a PCI VGA device. Thierry Reding at NVIDIA along with support from other developers worked out adding this non-PCI graphics support on the X.Org Server side.

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Firms wasting over £1bn per year on Linux-based cloud servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Firms that use Linux-based cloud servers are overspending on their cloud capacity by more than £1 billion annually for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (Iaas).

According to cloud provider ElasticHosts, the dominant payment model for IaaS is highly inefficient, and even at its best, companies are overpaying by as much as 50 per cent.

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ownCloud Client 1.6.1

Filed under
Server
OSS

The recommendation is to update your installation to this version. The previous version 1.6.0 had great new features, first and foremost the parallel up- and download of files and a way more performant handling of the local sync journal. That required a lot of code changes. Unfortunately that also brought in some bugs which are now fixed with the 1.6.1 release.

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Canonical Supporting IBM POWER8 for Ubuntu Cloud, Big Data

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

If Ubuntu Linux is to prove truly competitive in the OpenStack cloud and Big Data worlds, it needs to run on more than x86 hardware. And that's what Canonical achieved this month, with the announcement of full support for IBM POWER8 machines on Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu Server.

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MIT scientists create 36-core chip speed demon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Right now the only operating system that supports this 36 core processors, are the ones based on Linux, though it is not certain which Linux based OS MIT researchers are using.

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Smooth like btrfs: Inside Facebook’s Linux-powered infrastructure

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Facebook engineer Chris Mason is unequivocal about the primacy of Linux in Facebook’s storage infrastructure.

“If it runs on a computer, and it’s storing important data,” he said, “it’s running Linux.”

Mason, speaking at the Linux Enterprise End-User Summit on Monday in New York, joined Facebook just six months ago in order to spearhead the social network’s move to btrfs (usually pronounced “butter eff ess.”), the Linux-based file system that he created in 2008 while working at Oracle.

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Also: Linux dominates supercomputers as never before

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More in Tux Machines

Some thoughts on Linux gaming in 2019, an end of year review

2019 is coming to a close, it's been a pretty wild year for Linux gaming that's for sure! Here's some thoughts on the year and what to expect for 2020. Firstly, let's look over all the games that came to Linux in 2019. As usual, very little AAA support but that doesn't mean we don't get awesome experiences. We've had a huge amount of quality games, which is the important thing. Not including those currently in Early Access, here's a few random picks we've had released this year for Linux: Abandon Ship, AI War 2, Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition, DiRT 4, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS, Sky Racket, Rise to Ruins, Indivisible, Stygian: Reign of the Old Ones, Jenny LeClue - Detectivu, Police Stories, Overland, Devader, Dicey Dungeons, Oxygen Not Included, Streets of Rogue, Mosaic, The Eternal Castle: Remastered, Mindustry, Slay the Spire and so on. [...] Sadly, this year we saw a few games drop Linux support entirely with Rust, Natural Selection 2, Forager and Throne of Lies. Not many, but even one dropping support is not good. However, don't get too down about the above point. There's a huge amount of moving pieces, certainly when it comes to the future of Linux gaming. Right now, if you truly don't care about any details and just want to play games on Linux—you've never had it better. We have Steam Play, enabling Proton (and other tools like Boxtron) to run games through Steam not designed for Linux like Halo: The Master Chief Collection, No Man's Sky, Elite Dangerous, Deep Rock Galactic and plenty more. Wine also came along tremendously and when paired with DXVK/D9VK, even more games can be played easily on Linux like Overwatch. I don't personally think Steam Play Proton/Wine should ever replace proper support, to make that clear. The last thing we need is more lock-in because developers end up seeing less of a point in using cross-platform tech and open APIs. For now though, while we're a niche, Steam Play Proton and Wine fill a big gap and they're definitely important for that. Eventually when more people try out Linux and enjoy the experience and the market share rises as a result, then we can look to get proper support from more developers. Until then, be sure you keep supporting those who do put out Linux versions of their games. We also have the rise of streaming platforms like Google Stadia further taking away barriers to playing bigger titles on Linux. There's also whatever Steam Cloud Gaming turns out to be, that's going to be very exciting to find out more on. Hopefully Valve won't keep us waiting too long on it. Streaming platforms still have a long way to go though, and they have their own barriers of entry (especially internet speeds and bandwidth). Read more

Android Leftovers

Benchmarking 11 Linux Distributions Across Dozens Of Workloads On The Intel Core i9 10980XE

If opting for a high-end desktop/workstation like the Intel Core i9 10980XE and even for smaller systems, your choice of Linux distribution can be a big factor in the performance potential out of the system. In benchmarking eleven modern Linux distributions across dozens of benchmarks, the performance difference can be more than 30% for the out-of-the-box Linux performance. Benchmarked this round on the i9-10980XE were multiple versions of CentOS, Clear Linux, Debian, Fedora Workstation, Manjaro, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Solus, and Ubuntu. The newly-released Cascadelake-X Core i9 10980XE was used for this round of benchmarking with the GIGABYTE X299X DESIGNARE 10GB motherboard, which has been working out well on all of the Linux distributions tested. The system had 4 x 8GB DDR4-3200 memory, Samsung 970 PRO 512GB NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics. The eleven Linux distributions tested were... Read more

Funding and Flunking

  • Creators of the Open Source ​DAML​ Smart Contract Language Digital Asset – Raises $35 Million in Series C

    The creators of the open-source ​DAML​ smart contract language, ​Digital Asset​ (DA), has raised approximately $35 million in Series C funding from new and existing investors. According to DA, the latest financing round brings the total amount raised by the company to $150 million.

  • High Fidelity lays off half of staff, pulls plug on open-source VR platform

    High Fidelity is laying off half of its workforce and halting development on its open-source VR platform. High Fidelity CEO Philip Rosedale announced the moves in a blog post yesterday. It is the second big pivot for the company this year. In May, it laid off 25% of its employees as it switched gears from building a VR "metaverse" to a narrower goal of building its tech for virtual office spaces. "We plan to continue to use our technology as our company's primary virtual office but we have decided not to commercialize the virtual workplace application at this time," Rosedale said. "Simply put, having taken a close look, while we can see that remote work is going to continue on its growth trajectory and we do have customers using it -- the opportunity is not big enough today to warrant additional development."

  • Andreessen Horowitz's new growth fund just invested $30 million into Imply, an open source data analytics startup taking on Microsoft and Salesforce's Tableau
  • EnterpriseDB Announces Postgres Platform 12; Extends Leading Open Source Database

    EnterpriseDB, the enterprise Postgres company, today announced the worldwide general availability of its EDB Postgres Platform 12. This new version includes updates to the company’s flagship database management system (DBMS) and tools. These deliver scalability, high availability and disaster recovery that build on the capabilities of PostgreSQL 12 required for enterprises. “Postgres has never been hotter both in terms of its end user adoption and technology momentum,” said Ed Boyajian, president and CEO of EnterpriseDB. “We are obsessed with helping our customers get to value faster with Postgres. Our engineers continue to set the standard for Postgres innovation in response to the needs of enterprises.”