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Hands-on with Canonical’s Orange Box and a peek into cloud nirvana

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Server
Hardware
Ubuntu

First off, Canonical emphasized to Ars multiple times that it is not getting into the hardware business. If you really want to buy one of these things, you can have Tranquil PC build one for you (for £7,575, or about $12,700), but Canonical won’t sell you an Orange Box for your lab—there are too many partner relationships it could jeopardize by wading into the hardware game. But what Canonical does want to do is let you fiddle with an Orange Box. It makes for an amazing demo platform—a cloud-in-a-box that Canonical can use to show off the fancy services and tools it offers.
Inside the custom orange chassis are ten stripped Intel Ivy Bridge D53427RKE NUCs. Each comes with 16GB of RAM and a 120GB SSD, and they’re all connected to a gigabit Ethernet switch. One of the NUCs is the control node; its USB and HDMI ports are wired to the Orange Box’s rear panel, and that particular node also runs Canonical’s MAAS software. Its single unified internal 320W power supply runs on a single 110v outlet—even when all ten nodes are going flat-out, it doesn't require a second power plug.

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Red Hat looks to the OpenStack cloud with Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4

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Red Hat
Server

In this latest RHEV release, Red Hat states that it brings new "enhancements for traditional virtualization infrastructure, guest support for the newly released Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, as well as advanced OpenStack [cloud] support across compute, storage and networking."

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Red Hat: Governments should invest in open source cloud to keep up with technology

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Red Hat
Server
Interviews

Governments should invest in open source cloud to avoid getting trapped with a vendor and their offerings when they need to meet policy requirements or the time comes to update to new technology, Red Hat says.

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How Does IBM's Power8 Stack Up Against Competition?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Should Intel Relevant Products/Services Xeon-based system manufacturers be worried? IBM just started shipping the next generation of Power Systems services with its Power8 processor Relevant Products/Services. The processor can be licensed and is open for development through the OpenPower Foundation -- and Big Blue is making some big claims.

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"Shatter" Might Finally Materialize For The X.Org Server

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Server

A new African student developer from Cameroon, Nyah Check, has proposed working on Shatter with financing provided by the Endless Vacation of Code. Here's the synopsis for what he hopes to accomplish, "This project seeks to support shatter rendering in a multi-head Xephyr by dividing rendering between multiple Xephyr GPUs screens by using the impedance layer to the X server. This will comprise of polishing the current implementation of the impedance layer and testing for shatter rendering on two Xephyr GPU screens. This would be the scope of this summer's project which will eventually continue to completely add shatter and replace Xinerama by splitting the protocol objects from the driver objects modularizing the acceleration architectures and framebuffer layers under the driver rending layer and the damage, protocol decode layers under the protocol layer interface, communicating through the impedance layer interface. This removes duplicate protocol processing and storage of information lowering Xinerama multiplexing to the impedance layer boundary. This would enable multiplexing below the protocol screen."

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OpenStack Designate Brings DNS as a Service Into Incubation

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Server
OSS

I've been following the Designate project, which provide OpenStack DesignateDNS-as-a-Service for OpenStack for some time. It's a project that seems painfully obvious to me, enabling DNS features within an OpenStack cloud deployment.

DNS is a critical network service and without it, I really don't understand how OpenStack service providers could possibly properly scale a business. If DNS isn't inside OpenStack it's outside of it, with a more manual and more painful, less 'cloudy' approach.

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Mesosphere Raises $10.5 Million to Create Massive Linux Clusters

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Thanks to the advent of multicore processors, the average data center these days has access to a massive amount of compute capacity. Tapping into it efficiently, though, is another thing altogether.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Rackspace

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Interviews

Rackspace has lately been in the news for its stock market gains and a potential acquisition. But over the past 16 years the company has become well known, first as a web hosting provider built on Linux and open source, and later as a pioneer of the open source cloud and founder of the OpenStack cloud platform.

In May, Rackspace became a Xen Project member and was one of three companies to join the Linux Foundation as a corporate member, along with CoreOS and Cumulus Networks.

“Many of the applications and infrastructure that we need to run for internal use or for customers run best on Linux,” said Paul Voccio, Senior Director of Software Development at Rackspace, via email. “This includes all the popular language frameworks and open virtualization platforms such as Xen, LXC, KVM, Docker, etc.”

In this Q&A, Voccio discusses the role of Rackspace in the cloud, how the company uses Linux, why they joined the Linux Foundation, as well as current trends and future technologies in the data center.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Announcement Likely Tomorrow

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

Red Hat was just sending out press invites this afternoon for a virtual event tomorrow regarding "an exciting product" that will be announced.

Registration for the online event happening tomorrow (10 June) at 11AM EST can be found at RedHat.com. The site says it's about, "redefining the enterprise OS."

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Calxeda co-founder unleashs 48-core ARM SoC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

The devices support a variety of Linux distros, with KVM and Xen virtualisation support, Java and GCC development support.

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More in Tux Machines

IBM and SUSE Leftovers

  • Deploying your storage backend using OpenShift Container Storage 4

    This Blog is for both system administrators and application developers interested in learning how to deploy and manage Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4 (OCS). This Blog outlines how you will be using OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) 4.2.14+ and the OCS operator to deploy Ceph and the Multi-Cloud Object Gateway as a persistent storage solution for OCP workloads. If you do not have a current OpenShift test cluster, you can deploy OpenShift 4 by going to the OpenShift 4 Deployment page and then follow the instructions for AWS Installer-Provisioned Infrastructure (IPI).

  • What desktop OS do you use at work?

    We have all heard the age-old debate of what is the best operating system user prefer. Windows or Mac? Linux or nothing. The funny thing about this question is that in many places of business, the user does not get a choice. You are handed a laptop when you start and may be stuck with whatever is preloaded onto the machine. In some cases, you're not even allowed to run something else in a virtual machine.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-03

    I will not hold office hours next week due to travel, but if you’ll be at DevConf.CZ, you can catch me in person.

  • Martin de Boer: Comparing uptime performance monitoring tools: StatusCake vs Freshping vs UptimeRobot

    When you host your own website on a Virtual Private Server or on a DigitalOcean droplet, you want to know if your website is down (and receive a warning when that happens). Plus it’s fun to see the uptime graphs and the performance metrics. Did you know these services are available for free? I will compare 3 SaaS vendors who offer uptime performance monitoring tools. Of course, you don’t get the full functionality for free. There are always limitations as these vendors like you to upgrade to a premium (paid) account. But for an enthousiast website, having access to these free basic options is already a big win! I also need to address the elephant in the room: Pingdom. This is the golden standard of uptime performance monitoring tools. However, you will pay at least €440 per year for the privilege. That is a viable option for a small business. Not for an enthousiast like myself. The chosen free alternatives are StatusCake, Freshping and UptimeRobot. There are many other options, but these ones are mentioned in multiple lists of ‘the best monitoring tools’. They also have user friendly dashboards. So let’s run with it.

  • Vinzenz Vietzke: Running for openSUSE Board #2: Questions and Answers

    Already in the beginning of 2019 I have been a candidate for the board of openSUSE. Since there are now two places open again, I am again available for the task and run for election. A general overview of my ideas and goals can be found here. In the run-up to the election all candidates of the community are of course open for questions. I have answered a catalogue of 5 questions from Gerald Pfeifer, currently chairman of the board, and would like to make it available here.

  • Q&A for openSUSE Board elections

    Our openSUSE Chairman has some questions for the candidates for the openSUSE Board. My answers are here:

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Seth McCombs, "5 Things I Hate About Linux"

  • 2020-01-17 | Linux Headlines

    Nextcloud announces exciting changes to the platform, Puppet is now releasing both faster and slower, DigitalOcean?s restructuring is resulting in layoffs, and Fedora CoreOS reaches production-ready status.

  • Infrastructure Engineer: Seth McCombs | Jupiter Extras 47

    Ell and Wes are joined by Infrastructure Engineer Seth McCombs for a chat about how he got started in tech, the hard transition from legacy data centers to the cloud, and why being honest about both success and failure can lead to a better open source community.

  • 5 Things I Hate About Linux

    So I love Linux for my daily desktop driver, but there are some things that I hate about it. Here are the 5 things that I wish were different.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Meet the newest Collaborans!

    What better way to start the new year than by highlighting the newest members of our engineering and administrative teams who joined in Q4 2019! Based in Italy, Portugal, the United Kingdom and Greece, these newest Collaborans join our worldwide team of highly skilled engineers, developers and managers who all share a common passion for technology and Open Source.

  • MariaDB X4 brings smart transactions to open source database

    MariaDB has come a long way from its MySQL database roots. The open source database vendor released its new MariaDB X4 platform, providing users with "smart transactions" technology to enable both analytical and transactional databases. MariaDB, based in Redwood City, Calif., was founded in 2009 by the original creator of MySQL, Monty Widenius, as a drop-in replacement for MySQL, after Widenius grew disillusioned with the direction that Oracle was taking the open source database. Oracle acquired MySQL via its acquisition of Sun Microsystems in 2008. Now, in 2020, MariaDB still uses the core MySQL database protocol, but the MariaDB database has diverged significantly in other ways that are manifest in the X4 platform update. The MariaDB X4 release, unveiled Jan. 14, puts the technology squarely in the cloud-native discussion, notably because MariaDB is allowing for specific workloads to be paired with specific storage types at the cloud level, said James Curtis, senior analyst of data, AI and analytics at 451 Research.

  • SecureMyEmail makes really private email surprisingly simple

    The service also allows seamless, key-free transmission to other SecureMyEmail subscribers and to others who use PGP software such as the PGP-compatible free-software GNU Privacy Guard.

  • Copy-left behind: Permissive MIT, Apache open-source licenses on the up as developers snub GNU's GPL

    Permissive open-source software licenses continue to gain popularity at the expense of copyleft licenses, according to a forthcoming report from WhiteSource, a biz that makes software licensing management tools. Permissive licenses include the MIT and Apache 2.0 licenses and are known as such because the permit licensors to do more or less what they want with the covered software, with minimal caveats, and without imposing obligations like sharing code revisions. Copyleft licenses like GPLv2, GPLv3, and LGPLv2.1 convey similar freedom, while, to put it simply, requiring that licensors not release versions or derivatives of the licensed code that restrict said freedom.