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Servers: OpenStack, Tidelift and NumFOCUS, Containers and More

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  • OpenStack Train Adds Updates to Keep Open Source Cloud on Track

    After nine years of releases, OpenStack executives claim the open source cloud effort is still on track, with the latest release loaded with features.

  • Tidelift and NumFOCUS partner to support essential community-led open source data science and scientific computing projects

    NumFOCUS, a nonprofit supporting better science through open code, and Tidelift today announced a partnership to support open source libraries critical to the Python data science and scientific computing ecosystem. NumPy, SciPy, and pandas—sponsored projects within NumFOCUS—are now part of the Tidelift Subscription. Working in collaboration with NumFOCUS, Tidelift financially supports the work of project maintainers to provide ongoing security updates, maintenance and code improvements, licensing verification and indemnification, and more to enterprise engineering and data science teams via a managed open source subscription from Tidelif

  • The Substrate To Bind Datacenter Switching And Routing

    The appliance model, where the hardware and software were tightly controlled by a single vendor, held sway in the datacenter for decades. But that top-to-bottom stack been peeling apart, oddly enough because it was never established on the PC, but particularly as Linux emerged as an open, cross platform operating system that was eager embraced on servers, first by the HPC community and then by the hyperscalers and the cloud builders.

    Even with Unix servers, which were open in terms of supporting common APIs and providing a modicum of cross-platform compatibility, the operating system and related software stack was generally made by the same company that designed the processors and the hardware system that used them. Linux and Windows Server, which jumped form the desktop to the datacenter after decades of hard pushing and platform buildout by Microsoft, provided portability and superior price/performance for many (but not all) workloads, and this finally broke the server software free of the server hardware.

  • Ma Bell, Not Google, Creates The Real Open Source Borg

    True to its name, Google’s famous Borg cluster controller has absorbed a lot of different ideas about how to manage server clusters and the applications that run atop them at the search engine and now cloud computing giant. And while the Kubernetes container controller that Google open sourced in June 2014 was certainly inspired by Borg, Kubernetes was really more of a kernel than it was a complete system, and the way you know that is that it took a long time to get Kubernetes to be truly usable in the enterprise.

    Oddly enough, Airship, a mashup of Kubernetes, the OpenStack cloud controller with bare metal extensions, and a slew of other open source projects spearheaded by AT&T – yes, the same Ma Bell that created the C compiler and then the Unix operating system back in 1969, starting the open source and Unix revolutions – has surprisingly and, at least to some, quietly created a complete software stack that arguably rivals Borg and its extensions inside of Google.

  • Containers, and why the future is open source

    Software containerisation is unlikely to be at the top of the list of considerations for the average storage administrator. First and foremost, storage professionals are going to be concerned with every enterprise’s most pressing problem: managing the “explosive” volume of data within the constraints of their limited IT budget.

    However, there are compelling reasons why storage professionals should be thinking about containerisation as its rapid adoption will impact the road map of your existing storage providers and drive changes to your own organisation’s data storage strategy.

    Let’s take a moment to get a basic understanding of what containerisation is all about, look a little deeper at those implications to your storage strategy and also discuss how open-source software-defined storage can help you with your data storage challenges.

    [...]

    Against this backdrop of the ever-growing communities of open-source developers, the limited development capability of isolated, commercially operated silos has little chance of long-term success. This is why it is clear – the future is open source.

  • 14 DevOps Tools Applications & Examples You Should Know

Thinking big: Nextcloud chief aims to overtake Office365 and GSuite

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Web

The head of the open-source file syncing and sharing software company Nextcloud, which has been growing at a fast pace, has ambitions to overtake proprietary services like Office 365 and Google GSuite.

Founder and chief executive Frank Karlitschek told iTWire that, given these plans, the forthcoming Nextcloud releases would see big improvements in productivity, collaboration, communications, scalability and security.

Nextcloud was started as a breakaway from another company, ownCloud, that Karlitschek himself started in 2010. Asked about the split, which occurred in 2016, he said he did not want to dwell on the reasons for the break-up, but said: "At the end of the day the complete set-up of the old company was wrong. [It had] the wrong management, investors, product focus and strategy.

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Has container hype jumped the shark?

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You can't read tech news anymore without seeing containers everywhere. Containers have become the way for everyone to run their jobs on the cloud. And, to manage containers, Kubernetes is everyone's favorite. But, according to a Cloud Foundry, the open-source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) survey of CIOs and top-level programmers, developers are calling the IT shots, and they're getting a little tired of all containers all the time.

Instead, the report, Climbing up the Stack, found that while PaaS usage has jumped 6% in the last two quarters (41% to 47%), serverless usage and container usage are leveling at 14% and 37%, respectively. It's not that containers are going away. They're much too valuable for that happen.

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NextCloud on Pi Adventures and Escaping Google

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Google
OSS
Web

  • NextCloud on Pi Adventures

    I spent yesterday *finally* setting up a NextCloud instance of my own. It’s been on my todo since I installed fiber at home and got a decent Internet connection.

    I started out with Rasbian Lite and combined it with the NextCloudPi install script from ownyourbits. I then used certbot to install certificates from let’s encrypt before migrating the data directory using these instructions.

    After that it was happy account creation time, before realizing that I could not upload files larger than ~10kB. Very annoying.

  • Escape Google!

    Being practical most people are going to want to keep using Google services, but at least knowing what the issues are, how you can use privacy-enhanced versions or escape completely with your own services is good to know. While Nextcloud is so slick these days and with pre-packaged options it’s certainly fun just to try out, if not deployed as a full-time personal cloud solution.

    But it’s not all worrying about invasion of the privacy snatchers, we’ve plenty of down-to-earth tutorials and projects to keep you busy. We take another look at using Audacity to improve your YouTube audio and create effects, we test out of a bunch of server distros to see which is best for you in Roundup, there’s some lovely retro loving with a look at running ZX Basic and we look at building a wearable webcam from a Pi Zero. Enjoy!

Open source database use is a growing trend

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OSS

Open source databases are a growing segment of the overall database management system market, but according to a new survey, users are working with multiple databases adapted for specific purposes and not looking at single databases as multi-purpose.

The Open Source Data Management Software survey was conducted by Percona, a vendor based in Raleigh, N.C. that provides supported versions of multiple open source database platforms including PostgreSQL, MySQL and MongoDB.

Some 92% of survey respondents saying they are using multiple database technologies, with 89% using more than one open source database platform. The study, conducted earlier this year, also found that cloud deployments are a growing trend, with more than 50% running at least one workload in the public cloud.

"It's hard for one database to do everything well, so the trend is definitely to use the best database for the job, rather than try and fit into a single technology," said Matt Yonkovit, chief experience officer at Percona.

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Also: Sourcehut Q3 2019 Financial report

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

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  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability.

    But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers.

    But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined.

    After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff.

    [...]

    Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.

Dodging derailment by SUSE, OpenStack Train is scheduled to arrive this week

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OSS
SUSE

With its OpenInfrastructure summit mere weeks away, the OpenStack gang is emitting its next release in the form of "Train" with a focus on data protection and machine learning.

The release comes after foundation platinum member SUSE threw in the towel over OpenStack Cloud in order to move on to a bright, Kubernetes-based future.

Not that the "S" word was mentioned, even in a waveringly high-pitched tone, as OpenStack readied Train ahead of a release expected on 16 October.

As is the norm, OpenStack was keen to shout about the more than 25,500 accepted code changes this time around, from 1,125 developers over 150 organisations. A glance at the content of the release shows that OpenStack is as bewilderingly vast as ever, although a number of tweaks merit closer attention.

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Top 20 Best NodeJS CMS Platforms To Use in 2019 and New WordPress RC

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  • Top 20 Best NodeJS CMS Platforms To Use in 2019

    NodeJs has been a popular web framework. It has been used to develop highly scalable web applications. A statistic shows that more than 1.5 Lakh websites are using NodeJs on a regular basis. And the number is increasing proportionally. When it comes to Content Management System (CMS), many NodeJs frameworks have been leading the way to a consistent digital content platform. For years now, NodeJs has been used to create some powerful CMS architectures. If you look closely, you will find some useful NodeJs CMS structures that you have been looking for your projects.

  • WordPress 5.3 Release Candidate

    The first release candidate for WordPress 5.3 is now available!

    This is an important milestone as we progress toward the WordPress 5.3 release date. “Release Candidate” means that the new version is ready for release, but with millions of users and thousands of plugins and themes, it’s possible something was missed. WordPress 5.3 is currently scheduled to be released on November 12, 2019, but we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.3 yet, now is the time!

Server: Knative, Puppet, Kubectl and EdgeX Foundry

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  • Google's Keeping Knative Development Under Its Thumb 'For the Foreseeable Future'

    In addition to Knative, which is for deploying serverless workloads, Google evidently plans to keep the Kubernetes service mesh, Istio, in-house.

  • Puppet’s New Cloud Native Continuous Delivery Tool Builds on the CDF’s Tekton [Ed: It says: "The Linux Foundation, Puppet, and Red Hat are sponsors of The New Stack." Read as: we're being paid to write this article by the subject of this article.]

    Puppet has released into public beta its Project Nebula, a cloud native tool that connects a DevOps team’s existing toolset into an end-to-end, continuous delivery platform. The company aims to simplify deployment of microservices and serverless-based applications by connecting popular tools for infrastructure provisioning, application deployment, and notifications into a single, automated workflow.

    “There are a few folks in the world who believe in one tool that solves all the problems. And then there are folks who believe in best-of-breed and pulling the right tools for the right job with the right people, and the right culture,” said Matthew Young, senior director of product management at Puppet. “And we’re really going after the latter… We are not trying to replace every other tool.”

  • Kubectl and friends as a snap

    At Canonical, we build solutions to simplify the lives of our users. We want to reduce complexity, costs, and barriers to entry. When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) and MicroK8s, we made sure it aligned with our mission. We built snaps like kubectl for various Kubernetes clients and services to ensure a harmonious ecosystem.

    From user feedback, requests and going over the exciting use cases our users and partners are experimenting with, sometimes you just need to get up and running. Kubernetes on a Raspberry Pi anyone? This is why we provide Kubernetes components such as kubectl, kubefed, kubeadm, etc. as snaps and open to use for your use cases.

  • EdgeX Foundry Organizes Its First Hackathon

    The project organized its first hackathon in Chicago to see how the retail industry leverages EdgeX Foundry to solve some of its pressing problems.

Servers/Back End: Kubeflow, Kubernetes and EdgeX Foundry

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  • Designing an open source machine learning platform for autonomous vehicles

    Self-driving cars are one of the most notable technology breakthroughs of recent years. The progress that has been made from the DARPA challenges in the early 2000s to Waymo’s commercial tests is astounding. Despite this rapid progress, much still needs to be done to reach full autonomy without humans in the loop – an objective also referred to as SAE Level 5. Infrastructure is one of the gaps that need to be bridged to achieve full autonomy.

    Embedding the full compute power needed to fully automatise vehicles may prove challenging. On the other hand, relying on the cloud at scale would pose latency and bandwidth issues. Therefore, vehicle autonomy is a case for edge computing. But, how to distribute and orchestrate AI workloads, data storage, and networking at the edge for such a safety-critical application? We propose an open-source architecture that will address these questions.

    [...]

    In order to implement an open-source machine learning platform for autonomous vehicles, data scientists can use Kubeflow: the machine learning toolkit for Kubernetes. The Kubeflow project is dedicated to making deployments of machine learning workflows simple, portable and scalable. It consists of various open-source projects which can be integrated to work together. This includes Jupyter notebooks and the TensorFlow ecosystem. However, since the Kubeflow project is growing very fast, its support is soon going to expand over other open-source projects, such as PyTorch, MXNet, Chainer, and more.

    Kubeflow allows data scientists to utilize all base machine learning algorithms. This includes regression algorithms, pattern recognition algorithms, clustering and decision making algorithms. With Kubeflow data scientists can easily implement tasks which are essential for autonomous vehicles. These tasks include object detection, identification, recognition, classification, and localisation.

  • Kubernetes communication, SRE struggles, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

  • Introducing a Tech Preview of Containerized Ceph on Kubernetes

    We have been hard at work to bring a containerized version of Ceph to Kubernetes, and we are very excited to announce that we are releasing a technical preview of our project to run SUSE Enterprise Storage (powered by Ceph) on SUSE CaaS Platform (powered by Kubernetes). We leverage the most modern, powerful application management framework to make Ceph lifecycle management easier, and we provide an easy way for SUSE CaaS Platform users to get Kubernetes-native persistent storage for their Kubernetes cluster backed by enterprise-grade software-defined storage.

    [...]

    The good news is that work on Rook and Ceph-Rook integration is a concentrated effort upstream. There are many eyes—and many fingers—working to make Ceph better on Kubernetes. We at SUSE are in a good position to make sure that Ceph and Rook work upstream will meet the unique needs of our customers, and we are thrilled that our customers and their needs are able to make upstream better.

  • Making The IoT More Open: A Common Framework For IoT Edge Computing With EdgeX Foundry

    The internet of things (IoT) is a diverse space, but it’s also fragmented by design, whether it’s consumer IoT or industrial IoT. In 2015, Dell started working on a project called Project Fuse to weave together the diverse and fragmented world of IoT. The idea was to build the right architecture for IoT and edge computing.

    The team working on the project quickly realized that they needed to extend the cloud-native principles — things like microservice-based architectures and platform independence — as close as possible to the device edge so that there would be more flexibility in how solutions are devised. In order to succeed, the project needed to be vendor-neutral, interoperable and open.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation. Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement. Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation. AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.

Security Patches and FUD/Drama

Android Leftovers