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Server: IBM, 'DevOps', Kubernetes, and OpenStack

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  • Big Blue levels up server sextet with POWER9 for IBM i, AIX, HANA, Linux

    IBM is bashing out a set of go-faster POWER9 servers in the face of mounting competition from Xeon SP systems.

  • Your DevOps attempt will fail without these 7 departments buying in

    When DevOps was coined by Andrew Shafer and Patrick Debois, the goal was to bring developers and operators closer to achieve customer value together. DevOps is a culture of continuous learning and improvement. While automation and tools can garner some improvements, having the right culture drives larger impacts. The sharing of knowledge and ideas resulting in cultural growth is the value creator in DevOps.

  • Kubernetes The Smart Way

    Kelsey Hightower, Developer Advocate at Google, kicked off the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon event in Austin with an opening keynote in which he demonstrated Kubernetes' ease of use with the help of his smartphone. Apart from commending the audience for making Kubernetes the boring-in-a-good-way framework it is today, Hightower also warned about how Kubernetes should not be considered the end game, but a means to an end.

    In his talk, Hightower first addressed the misconception that Kubernetes is difficult to install. He did so by installing an eight-node Kubernetes cluster in less than two minutes just by giving verbal instructions to the Kubernetes Engine assistant through his smartphone, thus proving tha Kubernetes generally gets out of the way quickly.

  • OpenStack: Open source community collaboration needed to overcome edge computing adoption barriers

    In a whitepaper co-authored by a number of open source advocates, the OpenStack Foundation makes the case for taking a teamwork approach to tackling the barriers to widespread edge computing adoption

    The open source cloud community is being urged to pull together and overcome the barriers preventing widespread adoption of edge computing practices becoming a reality.

  • Apache CloudStack 4.11 Boosts Open-Source Cloud Features

    Apache CloudStack v4.11 was officially released by the open-source Apache Software Foundation (ASF) on Feb. 12, after eight months of development.

    "This release has been driven by the people operating CloudStack clouds," Rohit Yadav, Apache CloudStack v4.11 Release Manager stated. "Along with great new features, v4.11 brings several important structural changes such as better support for systemd and Java 8, migration to embedded Jetty, and a new and optimized Debian 9 based systemvm template."

    CloudStack has been part of the ASF since April 2012, when Citrix donated the technology to the open-source foundation. Citrix had originally acquired from in July 2011. The first official Apache CloudStack release was version 4.0 which debuted in November 2012.

Kubernetes News

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  • The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

    TL;DR - Unabated 1.xx major “minor” releases of “vanilla” upstream Kubernetes every three months could continue forever. You have to keep up, while also paying close attention to Kubernetes API object versioning. This relentless pace is the key ingredient in Kubernetes’ domination of the distributed infrastructure world.

  • Correctly integrating containers

    Kubernetes supports different ways of making containers and microservices contact each other, from connections with the hardware in the data center to the configuration of load balancers. To ensure communication, the Kubernetes network model does not use Network Address Translation (NAT). All containers receive an IP address for communication with nodes and with each other, without the use of NAT.

    Therefore, you cannot simply set up two Docker hosts with Kubernetes: The network is a distinct layer that you need to configure for Kubernetes. Several solutions currently undergoing rapid development, like Kubernetes itself, are candidates for this job. In addition to bandwidth and latency, integration with existing solutions and security also play a central role. Kubernetes pulls out all stops with the protocols and solutions implemented in Linux.

  • Heptio's Craig McLuckie On Kubernetes Orchestration's Start at Google

    Heptio's co-founder and CEO sits down with ITPro Today and talks about how the Kubernetes orchestration platform got started at Google.

PostgreSQL 10.2 Officially Out

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  • Release 10.2

    Release date: 2018-02-08

  • PostgreSQL 10.2 Released With A Ton Of Security & Bug Fixes

    PostgreSQL 10.2 is now available as the latest point release to PostgreSQL 10.

    While PostgreSQL 10.0 brought a ton of new features and improvements when released last October, these point releases are focused on just improving the stability and fixes for this popular database system.

Mainframes and Containers

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  • Why Mainframes Aren't Going Away Any Time Soon

    IBM's former systems and technology CTO explains when it makes sense to buy a mainframe and what the advantages are.

  • Starling Bank cashes in on open source Kubernetes for flexibility and agility

    UK fintech Starling Bank is building on the evolution of its architecture with plans to move to a cross-cloud approach supported by open source container orchestration platform Kubernetes.

  • Kubernetes for dev infrastructure

    I was initially assigned to solve an easy-sounding problem: make integration tests faster. There were a few hundreds of Selenium-based workflows, which were running sequentially and taking up to 10 hours to complete. The obvious solution was to parallelize them. The problem was that they were not designed to run concurrently and hence we had to either refactor all tests or provide an isolated copy of the ThoughtSpot system (a test backend) for every thread to run on. Redesigning tests might look like a cleaner solution, but it would require a tremendous effort from the whole engineering team and a lot of test-related changes in the product, so it was not feasible. We’ve decided to take the second approach, and that left me with the task, I’ve ended up solving with the help of Docker and Kubernetes: make it possible to quickly (in 2–3 minutes) spin up dozens of test backends with pre-loaded test data, run tests, tear them down, repeat.

  • Kubernetes vs Docker Swarm: A comparison of cloud container tools

    Containers are rising like a hot air balloon in the cloud market. These days, the CIO can hardly move for suggestions of one-shot-wonder tools to lighten the burden of IT infrastructure management. But when it comes to the battle of Kubernetes vs Docker, which programme comes out on top?

    Touted as silver bullet simplifiers of software update administration, both tools are great for transporting applications from one system to another without risking compatibility problems, missing files or unexpected errors. In the first instance, using a container to transport applications is much faster and better value than using a virtual machine, so either product is a good place to start for boosting cloud architecture efficiency.

Nextcloud 13 Brings Improved UI, Video and Text Chat, End-to-end Encryption, Improved performance and more

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Nextcloud 13 is out after 9 months of development and testing. This release brings improvements to the core File Sync and Share like easier moving of files and a tech preview of our end-to-end encryption for the ultimate protection of your data. It also introduces collaboration and communication capabilities, like auto-complete of comments and integrated real-time chat and video communication. Last but not least, Nextcloud was optimized and tuned to deliver up to 80% faster LDAP, much faster object storage and Windows Network Drive performance and a smoother user interface. Read on to find out what else is new and don’t miss our thanks and invitation on the bottom!

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Servers: More on Kubernetes and Cisco Container Platform

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  • Portworx Release Its Open Source Kubernetes Scheduler Extender, STORK

    Today Portworx released its new STorage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes or STORK. According to the company, this new open-source project that takes advantage of the extensibility of Kubernetes to allow DevOps teams to run stateful applications like databases, queues and key-value stores more efficiently on Kubernetes. STORK provides key hyperconvergence, failure-domain awareness, storage health monitoring, and snapshot features for Kubernetes while being delivering through a plugin interface enabling it tow work with any storage driver for Kubernetes.

  • Kernel 4.16-rc1, Qubes OS 4.0, OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed and More

    Cisco announced its new Cisco Container Platform yesterday, which "simplifies and accelerates how application development and information technology (IT) operations teams configure, deploy, and manage container clusters based on 100 percent upstream Kubernetes."

  • Cisco Debuts Its Own Kubernetes Container Platform

    Cisco is getting deeper into the container world with the announcement on Jan. 31 that the company is building its own Cisco Container platform. The new platform is based on the open-source upstream Kubernetes container orchestration platform.

    The Cisco Container Platform will initially be available in April for Cisco's Hyperflex server system architecture, with a plan to add support for bare metal set to follow. The Cisco Container Platform adds Cisco's own control plane services on top of Kubernetes to enable what the company aims to be a turnkey deployment model.

    Sanjeev Rampal, Principal Engineer at Cisco, explained to ServerWatch that the plan is to have the Cisco Container Platform follow the upstream Kubernetes releases in an "N-1" cadence. The current most recent release of Kubernetes is version 1.9, with a 1.10 update expected to debut by March.

Server: STORK, Cisco Container Platform, and CoreOS

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  • Portworx open-sources STORK software to fix issues with data services on Kubernetes

    Software container company Portworx Inc. is unveiling a new open-source project aimed at developers, enabling them to run stateful applications such as databases, queues and key value stores more efficiently on Kubernetes.

    The STorage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes, or STORK, works by communicating with storage drivers via a plugin interface so it can help address a number of issues that plague data services when running container software at scale.

  • Cisco jumps into containers

    How do you know when a technology has really made it? When companies that are not known for being innovators adopt it. That's the case today, as Cisco announced its Cisco Container Platform (CCP), a Kubernetes-based container platform. Another day, another company betting on Kubernetes for the cloud win.

    The CCP is designed to enable companies to build multi-cloud architectures with consistent application deployment and management on Cisco HyperFlex, virtual machines (VMs), and bare metal, both on premises and in the cloud. It will be available first on HyperFlex in April 2018. CCP will show up on other platforms this summer.

  • Red Hat buys the creator of a Chrome-based OS for servers

    The underpinnings of Chrome OS have found their way into the server room in a very roundabout way. Red Hat has acquired CoreOS, the creators of an operating system for containerized apps (Container Linux) that shares roots with both Google's Chromium OS project and Gentoo Linux. The $250 million deal promises to help Red Hat fulfill its dreams of helping people use open code to deploy apps in any environment they like, whether it's on a local network or multiple cloud services.

  • Red Hat Acquires CoreOS to Bolster Its Containerisation Efforts

    Expanding its presence in the world of containerisation, Red Hat has announced the acquisition of CoreOS, the container management startup that has been renowned for its CoreOS Tectonic, for $250 million (roughly Rs. 1,600 crores). The new deal is not only likely to help the North Carolina-headquartered company that is dominating the open source market but would also eventually give a boost to the existing enterprise-grade containerised infrastructure. CoreOS is also popular for developing Container Linux, which is a dedicated platform for containerised apps. The operating system shares foundations with Google's Chromium OS and Chrome OS in addition to leveraging modular Linux distribution Gentoo Linux. Having said that, the core interest of the acquired company lies within Kubernetes that is a modern distributed system designed by Google.

  • Linux Pioneer Red Hat Buys CoreOS for $250 Million

    Red Hat is an acknowledged player in open-source technologies, best known for its contribution to the success of Linux. The company has just disclosed a deal to buy CoreOS Inc. for $250 million – the container applications provider could be a great fit for the Red Hat ecosystem.

    Their products include a Linux distribution, also called CoreOS and Tectonic – a container management system based on Kubernetes, originally a Google platform.

    Red Hat already possesses a sizable container offerings portfolio, like Red Hat OpenShift, along with Kubernetes capabilities. CoreOS’s complementary solutions would accelerate development and encourage businesses to move to hybrid cloud structures – now a quick, easy transition.

dNOS at the Linux Foundation

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  • AT&T dNOS Project Taps Linux Foundation for Disaggregated Operating System

    AT&T is introducing the disaggregated Network Operating System – dNOS – in an effort to stimulate the creation of flexible, open and less expensive equipment that fits easily into virtualized networks.

    The open source project will be hosted by The Linux Foundation. The idea is to create a software framework enabling a broad and diverse equipment ecosystem – software developers, network operators, cloud providers, hardware makers, networking application developers and others – to use generic white box infrastructure to provide cost and efficiency advantages.

  • AT&T to offer alternative to integrated networking equipment with open source dNOS project

    AT&T says it plans to open source the Disaggregated Network Operating System, or dNOS project, to offer the industry an open, flexible alternative to traditional integrated networking equipment. Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the dNOS project will deliver a software framework to progress white box adoption and use in a service provider's infrastructure. Software developers, cloud providers, network operators, hardware makers, and networking application developers will have the ability to develop new white box infrastructure to affordably meet customer's changing demands, says AT&T.

Rook, an open-source project adding storage to Kubernetes, joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

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The Cloud Native Computing Foundation has agreed on the 15th project to grace its roster: Rook, a storage-oriented plugin for Kubernetes.

Developed by Seattle’s Bassam Tabbara while he was CTO of Quantum Systems, Rook is an open-source project that allows Kubernetes users to enjoy the benefits of having storage more closely connected to their clusters. It’s the latest move by the CNCF community to make Kubernetes — the popular open-source project used to manage large deployments of applications built around containers — easier to use for a wider base of technology organizations.

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today's leftovers

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  • Mirantis CEO Adrian Ionel Comes Back, Champions Open Source for Multi-Cloud

    Mirantis brought back its original CEO and Co-founder Adrian Ionel (pictured), to move the company beyond private cloud and help its customers adopt multi-cloud strategies. Alex Freeland, who is also a co-founder, will step down as CEO but remain a board member.

    Ionel served as CEO from the company’s launch in 2011 until 2015, when he left to start up Dorsal, an open source software support firm. During his initial tenure at Mirantis he led the company’s investment in OpenStack, growing its customer base to more than 200 enterprises.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 49

    Time goes by and the YaST wheel keeps rolling. So let’s take a look to what have moved since our previous development report.

  • Storage-NG Now Active In openSUSE Tumbleweed

    SUSE's libstorage-ng back-end for YaST's new low-level storage library is now active within the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution.

    Libstorage has traditionally been responsible for SUSE/openSUSE's disk/partition/LVM management and other storage device management. After more than two years of work, libstorage-ng has replaced libstorage within Tumbleweed.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Valve, Modernisation in Google Summer of Code, Trigger Happy Havoc

  • Valve's Latest Steam Client Adds 2X-Scaling Mode on Linux, HiDPI on Windows 10
    Valve released today a new Steam Client stable update for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, bringing long-anticipated features and improvements, along with numerous bug fixes.
  • Modernization of games
    This year I have proposed a Google Summer of Code idea (we are in student applications period) for modernizing Five-or-More, a game left out from the last games modernization round, when most of the games have been ported to Vala.
  • Trigger Happy Havoc Might Just Be The Weirdest Game on Linux
    With a special developer GDC viewing party tomorrow, I wanted to get us up to speed on the insanity that is Trigger Happy Havoc right now. I’m gonna level with you. My first impression of Spike Chunsoft’s offering, based on the trailer, was a tall glass of double checking reality garnished with a sprig of WTF.

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Benchmarks

Last week on Pi Day marked the release of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with a slightly higher clocked Cortex-A53 processors, dual-band 802.11ac WiFi, faster Ethernet, and other minor enhancements over its predecessor. I've been spending the past few days putting the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ through its paces the past few days with an array of benchmarks while comparing the performance to other ARM SBCs as well as a few lower-end Intel x86 systems too. Here is all you need to know about the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ performance. Read more