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MAAS 2.3.0 (final) Released!

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Server
Ubuntu

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 (final) is now available!
This new MAAS release introduces a set of exciting features and improvements to the overall user experience. It now becomes the focus of maintenance, as it fully replaces MAAS 2.2
In order to provide with sufficient notice, please be aware that 2.3.0 will replace MAAS 2.2 in the Ubuntu Archive in the coming weeks. In the meantime, MAAS 2.3 is available in PPA and as a Snap.

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Linux Containers vs Virtual Machines

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Linux
Server

Ever since containers on Linux became popular, determining the difference between Linux containers and virtual machines has become trickier. This article will provide you with the details to understand the differences between Linux containers and virtual machines.

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With government approval, OpenStack adoption continues apace in China

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Server
OSS

Deployments of OpenStack cloud are growing faster in China and the APAC region than anywhere else in the world, backed in part by the Chinese government's vocal support for the open source infrastructure.

It is China in particular where some of the biggest deployments are running. China UnionPay recently overtook Visa for the largest volume of card payments in the world. The state-operated railway network China Rail oversees billions of passengers every year. By total number of subscribers China Mobile tops the list for biggest mobile phone operator globally. And the massive utility organisation the State Grid Corporation of China employs 1.5 million people.

All of these enormous enterprises are running OpenStack clouds. Why?

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Also:

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more.

The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system.

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Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

GNU/Linux in HPC

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GNU
Linux
Server

GNU/Linux World Domination (in HPC)

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • China moves ahead of US on Top 500 supercomputer list; Linux now found on every machine

    The bi-annual Top 500 supercomputer list has reached its fiftieth edition, bringing with it two important milestones: China has more machines on the list than the US, and every computer now runs Linux.

    Boasting 202 entries, China can now claim more supercomputers in the top 500 than ever before. At the same time, the US has its lowest number of places—144—since the list began 25 years ago. Back in June, China took 159 spots while the US led with 169.

  • It took 19 years, but Linux finally dominates an entire market

    LINUX MAY well still be viewed as the preserve of 'hobbyists', but there's one category of devices in which Linux rules the market: supercomputers. 

    According to ZDNet, it's the first time that Linux systems have taken all 500 spots in the TOP500 Supercomputer list - with the last two non-Linux supercomputers dropping off between the lists released in June and November of this year.

Servers: HPC, Red Hat, Fedora

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Red Hat
Server

Linux Now Powers 100% of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Linux Now Powers 100% of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers

    Linux now powers 100% of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers. That’s according to the latest stats out from supercomputer hawks TOP500, who post a biannual list of the world’s most powerful commercially available computer systems. Linux has long dominated the TOP500 list, powering the majority of the machines that make it.

  • Linux Now Powers ALL TOP500 Supercomputers In The World | TOP500 List 2017
  • China Now Has More Supercomputers Than Any Other Country

     

    China now has more of the world’s most powerful computer systems than any other country, replacing the U.S as the dominant nation on the list of the planet’s 500 fastest supercomputers.

  • China Overtakes US in Latest Top 500 Supercomputer List

     

    China now claims 202 systems within the Top 500, while the United States -- once the dominant player -- tumbles to second place with 143 systems represented on the list.
     

    Only a few months ago, the US had 169 systems within the Top 500 compared to China's 160.

  • IT disaster recovery: Sysadmins vs. natural disasters

    In terms of natural disasters, 2017 has been one heck of a year. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria brought destruction to Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida, and the Caribbean. On top of that, wildfires burned out homes and businesses in the West.

    It’d be easy to respond with yet another finger-wagging article about preparing for disasters—and surely it’s all good advice—but that doesn’t help a network administrator cope with the soggy mess. Most of those well-meant suggestions also assume that the powers that be are cheerfully willing to invest money in implementing them.

Server: Containers, ARM Servers, and China's HPC Lead

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Server
  • OCI Update: v1.0.1 Release and New Maintainer

    The OCI community continues to be hard at work, having just issued the first update to OCI v.1.0, after five months of focusing on stability. OCI 1.0.1 contains updates to both the image format and runtime specifications.

    We’re still growing and expanding, with even more collaboration since the launch of v 1.0. For example, we are now up to over 5,000 commits from 184 authors across 42 different organizations. Organizations like AWS, Docker, Cloud Foundry, CoreOS, Intel, Mesosphere, Oracle, Red Hat and Kubernetes have already taken advantage of the OCI v1.0 specifications, and with v1.0.1 now available, the industry is on the precipice of true portability and standardization. We had a strong showing on site at recent industry events, at both DockerCon Europe in Copenhagen and Open Source Summit Europe in Prague.

  • How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity

    Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job. But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.

    That’s why technologies like the open source Kubernetes project are such a big part of the container scene.

  • ARM emulator in a VM? Yup, done. Ready to roll, no config required

    Hacking low-level code on ARM processors just became a little easier after a researcher who operates under the name Azeria Labs put together virtual machines that emulate common hardware.

  • AMD Rolls Out ROCm 1.7 Platform For Supercomputing 17

    AMD has unveiled the Radeon Open Compute platform (ROCm) 1.7 release as part of their wares at this week's Supercomputing 17 (SC17) conference in Denver.

    The ROCm 1.7 update introduces multi-GPU support for "the latest Radeon GPU hardware" (presumably referring to Vega) while also supporting TensorFlow and Caffe via AMD's MIOpen libraries.

  • Red Hat introduces Arm server support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM64
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM Hits General Availability

    Red Hat now considers their ARM support on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL7) to be supported under general availability "GA" terms.

  • Orange and Red Hat push open source NFVi development

    At the OpenStack Summit 2017, operator Orange has joined forces with equally colourful open-source software vendor Red Hat to promote NFVi innovation.

    Sadly the two companies have missed a trick by declining to name their mutual endeavour Orange Hat, but we mustn’t let that detract from the underlying cleverness. Orange seems to reckon network functions virtualization infrastructure is best done in the open-source environment and Red Hat unsurprisingly agrees.

  • China Pulls Ahead of U.S. in Latest TOP500 List

    The fiftieth TOP500 list of the fastest supercomputers in the world has China overtaking the US in the total number of ranked systems by a margin of 202 to 143. It is the largest number of supercomputers China has ever claimed on the TOP500 ranking, with the US presence shrinking to its lowest level since the list’s inception 25 years ago.

Server: MongoDB 3.6, Web Component. PHP 7.2.0 RC6

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Server
  • MongoDB 3.6 runs at the 'speed of data'

    MongoDB 3.6 will be generally available in early December.

    The open source (at its core) general purpose database has some noteable changes (its makers would call them enhancements) including a so-called ‘change streams’ feature, which enable developers to build what are being described as more ‘reactive’ web, mobile and IoT applications that can view, filter and act on data changes as they occur in the database.

  • I wrote a Web Component

    I’ve been meaning to play with Web Components for a little while now. After I saw Ben Nadel create a Twitter tweet progress indicator with Angular and Lucas Leandro did the same with Vue.js I thought, here’s a chance to experiment.

    Web Components involve a whole bunch of different dovetailing specs; HTML imports, custom elements, shadow DOM, HTML templates. I didn’t want to have to use the HTML template and import stuff if I could avoid it, and pleasantly you actually don’t need it. Essentially, you can create a custom element named whatever-you-want and then just add content here elements to your page, and it all works. This is good.

  • PHP 7.2.0RC6 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0 RC6. This release is the sixth Release Candidate for 7.2.0. Barring any surprises, we expect this to be the FINAL release candidate, with Nov 30th's GA release being not-substantially different. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • PHP 7.2 Is One Step Away From Release

    This week marked the sixth and final planned release candidate for PHP 7.2.

    This release is the final step before the official PHP 7.2 debut that is slated for 30 November unless there are any last minute blockers.

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Linux 4.15-rc4

So it looks like 4.15 is finally calming down, with rc4 being about average size-wise for this time in the release process. Of course, we not only have the holiday season coming up, we *also* have some x86 entry and page table handling fixes pending. But that's not for today, and not for rc4. Let's enjoy the short normal phase of 4.15 today. The most noticeable thing to most normal users in rc4 is that we should finally have cleaned up and fixed the suspend/resume handling. That got first broken for some (unusual) kernel configurations due to excessive debugging at a very inopportune time in early resume, and when _that_ got fixed, we broke the 32-bit case. Not many developers run 32-bit builds in real life any more, so that took a bit to even notice. Read more Also:Linux 4.15-rc4 Kernel Released

Kali Linux 2017.3 hands-on: The best alternative to Raspbian for your Raspberry Pi

Linux distributions designed for security analysis, penetration testing, and forensic analysis are all the rage these days. It seems like you can hardly swing a dead cat (or a dead computer) without hitting one. As a dedicated Linux user I consider that to be a good thing, simply because choice is always good, and it is always good to have several groups of talented and dedicated people working on something. But as a long-time user of Kali Linux (and BackTrack before that) I honestly believe that Kali is still the best in the field, so I am always pleased when I hear there is a new Kali release. Read more

Sri Lanka advised to go for open source software in schools

The Asian Development Bank has advised Sri Lanka to go for open source software as opposed to branded software in using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education. “Software is a prime concern in learning. Therefore, open source is recommended for a developing country like Sri Lanka to achieve international quality standards of ICT education,” the ADB said in a recent study. “Free and open source software provides a greatly flexible environment - economically, operationally, and technically - to implement ICT applications in education.” Administrative authorities of the school education system should be motivated and provided with guidelines for the use of free and open source software in the school environment, said the study on opportunities of ICT for education equity, quality, and efficiency in South Asia. Read more

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