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Server

Where To Try Nextcloud Service for Free?

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Server
OSS

Nextcloud is server-based free software all-in-one alternative to Google Drive with plugins capability that you can install to your server. It is very great, with it you can create file server for your office, with awesome additional plugins like LibreOffice Online ("Collabora") & Video Conference ("Talk") you can install as you wish. But if you do not have server to install it, where you can test out a Nextcloud service for free? There is a good news. Actually, Nextcloud Project already provides a gratis demo server at try.nextcloud.com everybody could use. By creating a free account, you can instantly test out Nextcloud with your friends. Enjoy!

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The 6 Best PostgreSQL Monitoring Tools in 2019

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Server
Software

The main point of monitoring PostgreSQL databases is to ensure that the data they hold is available whenever it is needed and that their performance—i.e. how fast they respond to queries—remains within acceptable parameters. Today, we’re having a look at a few of the best PostgreSQL monitoring tools.

We’ll start off by briefly explaining what PostgreSQL is, where it is coming from and how it came to be. After all, it can only help to know a bit more about what we’re trying to monitor. Then, we’ll specifically discuss the monitoring of PostgreSQL databases. We’ll learn how database servers should be considered in their entirety and that the best monitoring will not only include the actual database software but also the underlying operating system and hardware. We’ll then get to the core of this post as we introduce the best PostgreSQL monitoring tools we could find and give you a brief review of each one.

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Programming/Container: Sysdig Report, CNCF, SaaS and Qt Software Development Kit (Qt SDK)

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Development
Server
  • 4 container usage takeaways from the 2019 Sysdig report

    You probably already knew that most of the containers created by developers are disposable, but did you realize that half of them are only around for less than five minutes? That and other fascinating details are available in the latest annual container report from Sysdig, a container security and orchestration vendor.

    This is the company’s third such report. The results are obtained from their own instrumentation collected from a five-day period last month of the more than 2 million containers used by their own customers. This means the results could be somewhat skewed toward more experienced container developers.

    Nevertheless, the report merits some scrutiny. Here are four important takeaways.

  • CNCF Adopts Longhorn Storage Project from Rancher Labs

    Based on 30,000 lines of Go code employed to create separate engine and management plane, Longhorn is significantly lighter than traditional storage software because it builds on existing Linux storage primitives, Liang says. It also doesn’t require a dedicated storage administrator to deploy and manage. It’s designed from the ground up to be used by the same team managing the Kubernetes cluster, he notes, adding modern storage hardware such as solid-state drives (SSDs) and NVMe backplanes made it easier to build Longhorn without compromising performance.

    While some applications might want to access block storage directly, Liang says Rancher Labs expects most organizations will layer a file system on top of Longhorn to access various forms of persistent storage.

  • Lessons From A Failed SaaS - Building SaaS #37

    In this episode, we talked about the things I learned from my SaaS project and some of the reasons why it failed to succeed financially. We dug into the technical and marketing challenges that I faced and what went wrong.

    I’m shutting down my side project, College Conductor. The SaaS never achieved a sustainable level of success. I started the site to help my wife with her college consulting business. As you can see from what follows, the site didn’t mange to deliver what she (or anyone else) really needed.

  • Setup Complete Qt SDK on Ubuntu Eoan Ermine

    Qt Software Development Kit (Qt SDK) includes Qt Creator IDE & Qt Framework Libraries with Full Code Examples among other things. On Ubuntu 19.10, if you want to develop GUI applications with Qt, you need to install that Qt SDK first with a C++ compiler. Installing it on 19.10 is slightly different to different to 18.04 as this involves configuring GNU GCC C++ compiler on 19.10. After setup, you will have a ready, complete Qt SDK with Creator, Designer, Linguist, and Assistant works with G++ compiler. I hope this will be useful for you all. Happy hacking!

Containers: Kubernetes, Kinvolk and Diamanti

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Server
  • Red Hat Advances Java on Kubernetes Project

    Red Hat today achieved a 1.0 milestone in its efforts to make an instance of Java available for Kubernetes via the open source Quarkus project.

    Mark Little, vice president of engineering for Red Hat, says Quarkus 1.0 advances an effort to create a more efficient means for building and deploying Java applications on Kubernetes by reducing the size of the Java virtual machine (JVM). The JVM used today assumed that the JVM would include the code required to write once and deploy anywhere. However, in a container environment, portability issues are addressed by Docker containers and Kubernetes. That creates an opportunity to shrink the JVM in a way that will make Java applications running on Kubernetes run faster, notes Little.

  • Kinvolk Announces Commercial Support and Update Service for Flatcar Container Linux

    Kinvolk, the Kubernetes Linux experts, today announced the general availability of the Kinvolk Flatcar Container Linux Subscription, delivering the industry’s first and only commercially-supported, seamless in-place upgrade path for CoreOS Container Linux users. Included in the subscription is a new managed update service that enables fine-grain control and visibility of Flatcar Container Linux deployments at any scale.

  • Diamanti Raises $35 Million

    Kubernetes infrastructure company Diamanti has closed $35 million in Series C funding. Led by ClearSky, the funding round saw participation by current investors CRV, DFJ, Goldman Sachs, GSR Ventures, and Northgate Capital.

FOSS in Digital Transformation Agency (DTA)

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Server
OSS
  • Quick win: DTA shows how it’s done with open-source notification platform

    Four people, eight weeks, and $150,000.

    That is what it took for the Digital Transformation Agency to deliver a working prototype of a bulk email and text-message notification system.

    There was no need to build notify.gov.au from scratch. The DTA adapted an open-source product developed by the Government Digital Service in the UK, and invited public servants in any level of government to try it out free of charge.

    “More than 100 users from 47 agencies were trialling the service within three months of its launch. For smaller organisations in particular, it represents a major saving as they do not need to invest in establishing their own platform,” says the DTA annual report.

  • Open source notify.gov.au delivered in eight weeks for a cost of AU$150k

    The Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) wanted a way for government agencies to communicate easily with their customers, so it developed a vision for notifications from the perspective individuals interacting with government, and the government itself.

    According to DTA CEO Randall Brugeaud, the agency looked at several options to deliver what is now notify.gov.au.

    It settled on making use of an open source product that was already in place within the UK government.

    "It was running on the same technology infrastructure as we used for cloud.gov.au and it aligned with our Digital Service Standard, which has 13 criteria to describe how you deliver government services," Brugeaud told the Gartner IT Symposium/Xpo on the Gold Coast.

    "Self service allows the teams across government to create accounts, create and send email to users in minutes, there's templates, communications can be tailured, service teams can integrate with the platform into their backend system."

Top 20 Best Open Source School Management System in 2019

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Server
OSS

Managing school is a mammoth and painstaking job that requires substantial endeavor to get every job done accordingly. A school merely does not consist of pupils moreover; faculties, staff, parents as well as other stakeholders are also a crucial part of it. In addition to that, students’ admission, fees maintenance, taking the examination, making results, and report cards are almost continuous activities. Furthermore, teachers require making course outline, assignments, developing course materials. What is more, staff management, HR and payroll, and students’ class attendance need to monitor on a regular basis.

On top of that, parents want to know their kids’ performance, promotion, result cards, and so on. Handling manually all the activities are pretty much difficult; hence, school management software is required. In fact, there are great ranges of open source school management system that are incredibly handy to get the work done accordingly.

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Three New Container Capabilities in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7

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Red Hat
Server

We are proud to announce that users of RHEL 7.7 can now use Podman 1.4.4 to find, run, build and share containers as regular users (also called rootless). This builds on the work we did in RHEL 7.6 (A preview of running containers without root in RHEL 7.6).

The new rootless feature can be tested with a fresh installation of RHEL 7.7 or by upgrading from RHEL 7.6. When doing a fresh install, just add a new user ID and the new version of the shadow-utils package will take care of everything (/etc/subuid and /etc/subgid entries). With an upgrade from RHEL 7.6, you will need to add the UID/GID mappings for existing users. For more detailed information, follow the Managing Containers guide in the RHEL 7 documentation.

The tech preview of rootless containers offers only the the VFS driver (no fuse-overlay support). This has the trade-off of better runtime performance at the expense of using more disk space. The VFS driver does not use copy-on-write, so when the container is started it will copy all of the data from lower layers of the container image.

The runtime performance is improved because there is no copy-on-write cost, though it will result in slower start up and can consume quite a bit more disk space. We are currently working on backporting the fuse-overlay capabilities to the 3.10 kernel with an eye towards full fuse-overlay support during the RHEL 7 life cycle.

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Also: What Service Meshes Are, and Why Istio Leads the Pack

Servers: OpenStack, Kafka and Kubernetes Documentation

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Server
OSS
  • OpenStack Charms 19.10 – Train, Policy Overrides and more

    This release introduces support for OpenStack Train on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (via Ubuntu Cloud Archive) and Ubuntu 19.10. Train is the 20th OpenStack release which brings a lot of interesting features on its own. One of the most important additions are telco-specific extensions to Nova live migration. The benefits of moving guest machines from one hypervisor to another without shutting down the operating system of the guest are now also available in telco-specific environments with NUMA topology, pinned CPUs, SR-IOV ports attached and huge pages configured.

    In order to upgrade your Charmed OpenStack installation to Train, please follow the procedure described in the charm release notes.

    For more information about OpenStack Train, please refer to the upstream release notes.

  • Kafka Streams and How They Work

    Kafka streams seem like a daunting subject to many learners, but they don’t have to be. Just think of a stream as a sequence of events. In fact, when I put together information for this blog post, I joked that getting all this data would be like drinking from a waterfall. Chad (the Training Architect that created our new Kafka course) was able to take it a step further, and we went off on a tangent. This will help to explain it:

  • Kubernetes Documentation Survey

    In September, SIG Docs conducted its first survey about the Kubernetes documentation. We’d like to thank the CNCF’s Kim McMahon for helping us create the survey and access the results.

Virtualization versus Containers: Is there a clear winner? Does it really matter?

Filed under
Server
Misc

Will virtual machines disappear? No. Not anytime soon. This implies that the one day, container technology will eventually replace traditional virtual machines. So, I will save you from reading this entire piece to reach the conclusion of there being a clear winner. The answer is: no. There isn’t a clear winner primarily because both technologies are not one and the same. Each boasts their own respective features and functions and each solve their own set of problems. Understanding the problems in which each solves will better prepare you from misusing the technology.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.5+ Development

  • GRUB Now Supports Btrfs 3/4-Copy RAID1 Profiles (RAID1C3 / RAID1C4 On Linux 5.5+)

    When it comes to the storage/file-system changes with the in-development Linux 5.5 kernel one of the most prominent end-user-facing changes is more robust RAID1 for Btrfs with the ability to have three or four copies of the data rather than just two copies, should data safety be of utmost importance and concerned over the possibility of two disks in an array failing. The Btrfs "RAID1C3" mode was merged last week for this three/four-copy RAID1 while now the GRUB boot-loader has adapted support for these new profiles in order to be able to boot to said arrays.

  • Linux 5.5 Adds NFS Client Support For Cross-Device Offloaded Copies (Server To Server)

    With NFSv4.2 is the server-side copy (SSC) functionality with the Linux 5.5 kernel's NFS client-side support for that support in allowing "inter" copy offloads between different NFS servers. This support allows for server-to-server efficient file copies with NFSv4.2 SSC rather than first having to copy to the client system. The NFS client changes also introduce new RDMA tracepoints for debugging congestion control and various other fixes.

  • Linux 5.5 KVM Adds POWER Support For Secure Guests/VMs

    IBM's work from over a year ago in working towards secure virtual machines on POWER hardware is finally coming to fruition with Linux 5.5 due out early next year. After those original Secure Virtual Machine POWER9 patches were posted last year, the ultravisor / secure bits landed in Linux 5.4 in preparing the foundation. As explained in that earlier article, "The Ultravisor / SVM support is part of IBM's approach for protected computing that is akin to the approaches of Intel SGX and AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV). IBM's Ultravisor code runs with higher privileges than the virtualization hypervisor and in turn the virtual machines rely upon IBM Protected Execution for verifying the behavior of the hypervisor/ultravisor."

today's howtos

Debian: Voting, Packaging and More

  • Debian init systems GR - voting guide

    If you don't know what's going on, you may wish to read my summary and briefing blog post from a few weeks ago. There are 7 options on the ballot, plus Further Discussion (FD). With this posting I'm trying to help voting Debian Members (Debian Developers) cast their votes. I am going to be neutral about the technical merits of systemd. My advice does not depend on your opinion about that. So my advice here is addressed to people who like systemd and want to keep running it, and developing with it, as well as, of course, people who prefer not to use systemd. I'm even addressing readers who think systemd has useful features which they would like Debian packages to be able to use. However, I am going to be opinionated about one key question: My baseline is that Debian must welcome code contributions to support running without systemd, just as it welcomes code contributions for other non-default setups. If you agree with that principle, then this posting is for you. Unfortunately this principle is controversial. Several of the options on the current GR mean rejecting contributions of non-systemd support. So in that sense I am not neutral.

  • Charles Plessy: I voted

    Nevertheless, I am crushed under the number of options. Their texts are long, sometimes very similar, and do not separate clearly the normative from the preambles. Like in a parody of the dysfunctions of modern democracies, I ended up considering only the proposals written or seconded by people with whom I feel in phase. I have not voted for the others, which ranks them equally under « further discussion ».

  • Update to packaging the Jekyll import tool

    For moving my personal blog away from blogger I’ve put a lot of work into packaging and/or updating (the most common) Jekyll plugins for Debian. To ease the work further I began to package the Jekyll importers. But they need some (yet) unpackaged gems. So I’ve created an issue to track the progress and put my work on this package on hold. Yesterday @utkarsh2102-guest contacted me and asked me for more details. So I’ve spent the last hours to track down what actually needs to be done. And the news are a lot better than expected.

  • When terms and policy turn users away

    When asked to accept terms of use and privacy policies that state it will to remove rights I otherwise had or accept unreasonable terms undermining my privacy, I choose away the service. I simply do not have the conscience to accept terms I have no indention of upholding. But how are the system and service providers to know how many people they scared away? Normally I just quietly walk away.

NomadBSD 1.3 is now available!

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 1.3. Read more