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Servers: Kubernetes, Linode and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Server
  • Flavors of Data Protection in Kubernetes

    As containerized applications go through an accelerated pace of adoption, Day 2 services have become a here and now problem.

  • Doing the cloud differently

    Jeff Dike, one of the contributors to Linux, had developed a technology called User-mode Linux. UML, as it was known, allowed developers to create virtual Linux machines within a Linux computer. This Matrix-like technology was groundbreaking and opened the door for the virtualized cloud we know today.

    One of the developers Dike’s technology enabled was a young technologist named Christopher Aker. He saw an opportunity to use this technology not to build the next Salesforce or Amazon, but to make cloud computing less complicated, less expensive, and more accessible to every developer regardless of where they were located, what their financial resources were or who they worked for. The company he built — Linode — helped pioneer modern cloud computing.

  • A day in the life of a quality engineering sysadmin

    Let me begin by saying that I was neither hired nor trained to be a sysadmin. But I was interested in the systems side of things such as virtualization, cloud, and other technologies, even before I started working at Red Hat. I am a Senior Software Engineer in Test (Software Quality Engineering), but Red Hat, being positioned so uniquely because its products are something primarily used by sysadmins (or people with job responsibilities along similar lines) and also most of Red Hat’s products are primarily focused on backend systems-level instead of user application level. Our testing efforts include routine interaction with Red Hat’s Virtualization, OpenStack, Ansible Tower, and Hyperconverged Infrastructure.

    When I was hired, I was purely focused on testing Red Hat CloudForms, which is management software for the aforementioned environments. But as one of our previous senior software engineers departed to take on another role within Red Hat, I saw an opportunity that interested me. I was already helping him and learning sysadmin tasks by then, so after looking at my progress and interest, I was a natural successor for the work in my team’s perspective. And hence, I ended up becoming a sysadmin who is working partly as a software engineer in testing.

  • Getting to know Jae-Hyung Jin, Red Hat general manager for Korea

    We’re delighted to welcome Jae-Hyung Jin to Red Hat as a general manager for Korea. In the new role, he will be responsible for Red Hat’s business operations in Korea.
    Prior to joining Red Hat, Jae-Hyung Jin served as head of the enterprise sales and marketing group as a vice president at Samsung Electronics. He has held several key leadership positions in the past at leading technology and trading companies, including Cisco Systems, LG Electronics and Daewoo International. Jae-Hyung brings in nearly 25 years of experience in various industries, including telecommunications, manufacturing, finance and public.

  • Enterprise JavaBeans, infrastructure predictions, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

Servers: OpenStack, Tidelift and NumFOCUS, Containers and More

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Server
  • OpenStack Train Adds Updates to Keep Open Source Cloud on Track

    After nine years of releases, OpenStack executives claim the open source cloud effort is still on track, with the latest release loaded with features.

  • Tidelift and NumFOCUS partner to support essential community-led open source data science and scientific computing projects

    NumFOCUS, a nonprofit supporting better science through open code, and Tidelift today announced a partnership to support open source libraries critical to the Python data science and scientific computing ecosystem. NumPy, SciPy, and pandas—sponsored projects within NumFOCUS—are now part of the Tidelift Subscription. Working in collaboration with NumFOCUS, Tidelift financially supports the work of project maintainers to provide ongoing security updates, maintenance and code improvements, licensing verification and indemnification, and more to enterprise engineering and data science teams via a managed open source subscription from Tidelif

  • The Substrate To Bind Datacenter Switching And Routing

    The appliance model, where the hardware and software were tightly controlled by a single vendor, held sway in the datacenter for decades. But that top-to-bottom stack been peeling apart, oddly enough because it was never established on the PC, but particularly as Linux emerged as an open, cross platform operating system that was eager embraced on servers, first by the HPC community and then by the hyperscalers and the cloud builders.

    Even with Unix servers, which were open in terms of supporting common APIs and providing a modicum of cross-platform compatibility, the operating system and related software stack was generally made by the same company that designed the processors and the hardware system that used them. Linux and Windows Server, which jumped form the desktop to the datacenter after decades of hard pushing and platform buildout by Microsoft, provided portability and superior price/performance for many (but not all) workloads, and this finally broke the server software free of the server hardware.

  • Ma Bell, Not Google, Creates The Real Open Source Borg

    True to its name, Google’s famous Borg cluster controller has absorbed a lot of different ideas about how to manage server clusters and the applications that run atop them at the search engine and now cloud computing giant. And while the Kubernetes container controller that Google open sourced in June 2014 was certainly inspired by Borg, Kubernetes was really more of a kernel than it was a complete system, and the way you know that is that it took a long time to get Kubernetes to be truly usable in the enterprise.

    Oddly enough, Airship, a mashup of Kubernetes, the OpenStack cloud controller with bare metal extensions, and a slew of other open source projects spearheaded by AT&T – yes, the same Ma Bell that created the C compiler and then the Unix operating system back in 1969, starting the open source and Unix revolutions – has surprisingly and, at least to some, quietly created a complete software stack that arguably rivals Borg and its extensions inside of Google.

  • Containers, and why the future is open source

    Software containerisation is unlikely to be at the top of the list of considerations for the average storage administrator. First and foremost, storage professionals are going to be concerned with every enterprise’s most pressing problem: managing the “explosive” volume of data within the constraints of their limited IT budget.

    However, there are compelling reasons why storage professionals should be thinking about containerisation as its rapid adoption will impact the road map of your existing storage providers and drive changes to your own organisation’s data storage strategy.

    Let’s take a moment to get a basic understanding of what containerisation is all about, look a little deeper at those implications to your storage strategy and also discuss how open-source software-defined storage can help you with your data storage challenges.

    [...]

    Against this backdrop of the ever-growing communities of open-source developers, the limited development capability of isolated, commercially operated silos has little chance of long-term success. This is why it is clear – the future is open source.

  • 14 DevOps Tools Applications & Examples You Should Know

Thinking big: Nextcloud chief aims to overtake Office365 and GSuite

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Server
Web

The head of the open-source file syncing and sharing software company Nextcloud, which has been growing at a fast pace, has ambitions to overtake proprietary services like Office 365 and Google GSuite.

Founder and chief executive Frank Karlitschek told iTWire that, given these plans, the forthcoming Nextcloud releases would see big improvements in productivity, collaboration, communications, scalability and security.

Nextcloud was started as a breakaway from another company, ownCloud, that Karlitschek himself started in 2010. Asked about the split, which occurred in 2016, he said he did not want to dwell on the reasons for the break-up, but said: "At the end of the day the complete set-up of the old company was wrong. [It had] the wrong management, investors, product focus and strategy.

Read more

Has container hype jumped the shark?

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Server

You can't read tech news anymore without seeing containers everywhere. Containers have become the way for everyone to run their jobs on the cloud. And, to manage containers, Kubernetes is everyone's favorite. But, according to a Cloud Foundry, the open-source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) survey of CIOs and top-level programmers, developers are calling the IT shots, and they're getting a little tired of all containers all the time.

Instead, the report, Climbing up the Stack, found that while PaaS usage has jumped 6% in the last two quarters (41% to 47%), serverless usage and container usage are leveling at 14% and 37%, respectively. It's not that containers are going away. They're much too valuable for that happen.

Read more

NextCloud on Pi Adventures and Escaping Google

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Server
Google
OSS
Web

  • NextCloud on Pi Adventures

    I spent yesterday *finally* setting up a NextCloud instance of my own. It’s been on my todo since I installed fiber at home and got a decent Internet connection.

    I started out with Rasbian Lite and combined it with the NextCloudPi install script from ownyourbits. I then used certbot to install certificates from let’s encrypt before migrating the data directory using these instructions.

    After that it was happy account creation time, before realizing that I could not upload files larger than ~10kB. Very annoying.

  • Escape Google!

    Being practical most people are going to want to keep using Google services, but at least knowing what the issues are, how you can use privacy-enhanced versions or escape completely with your own services is good to know. While Nextcloud is so slick these days and with pre-packaged options it’s certainly fun just to try out, if not deployed as a full-time personal cloud solution.

    But it’s not all worrying about invasion of the privacy snatchers, we’ve plenty of down-to-earth tutorials and projects to keep you busy. We take another look at using Audacity to improve your YouTube audio and create effects, we test out of a bunch of server distros to see which is best for you in Roundup, there’s some lovely retro loving with a look at running ZX Basic and we look at building a wearable webcam from a Pi Zero. Enjoy!

Open source database use is a growing trend

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Server
OSS

Open source databases are a growing segment of the overall database management system market, but according to a new survey, users are working with multiple databases adapted for specific purposes and not looking at single databases as multi-purpose.

The Open Source Data Management Software survey was conducted by Percona, a vendor based in Raleigh, N.C. that provides supported versions of multiple open source database platforms including PostgreSQL, MySQL and MongoDB.

Some 92% of survey respondents saying they are using multiple database technologies, with 89% using more than one open source database platform. The study, conducted earlier this year, also found that cloud deployments are a growing trend, with more than 50% running at least one workload in the public cloud.

"It's hard for one database to do everything well, so the trend is definitely to use the best database for the job, rather than try and fit into a single technology," said Matt Yonkovit, chief experience officer at Percona.

Read more

Also: Sourcehut Q3 2019 Financial report

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

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Server
  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability.

    But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers.

    But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined.

    After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff.

    [...]

    Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.

Dodging derailment by SUSE, OpenStack Train is scheduled to arrive this week

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Server
OSS
SUSE

With its OpenInfrastructure summit mere weeks away, the OpenStack gang is emitting its next release in the form of "Train" with a focus on data protection and machine learning.

The release comes after foundation platinum member SUSE threw in the towel over OpenStack Cloud in order to move on to a bright, Kubernetes-based future.

Not that the "S" word was mentioned, even in a waveringly high-pitched tone, as OpenStack readied Train ahead of a release expected on 16 October.

As is the norm, OpenStack was keen to shout about the more than 25,500 accepted code changes this time around, from 1,125 developers over 150 organisations. A glance at the content of the release shows that OpenStack is as bewilderingly vast as ever, although a number of tweaks merit closer attention.

Read more

Top 20 Best NodeJS CMS Platforms To Use in 2019 and New WordPress RC

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Server
OSS
Web
  • Top 20 Best NodeJS CMS Platforms To Use in 2019

    NodeJs has been a popular web framework. It has been used to develop highly scalable web applications. A statistic shows that more than 1.5 Lakh websites are using NodeJs on a regular basis. And the number is increasing proportionally. When it comes to Content Management System (CMS), many NodeJs frameworks have been leading the way to a consistent digital content platform. For years now, NodeJs has been used to create some powerful CMS architectures. If you look closely, you will find some useful NodeJs CMS structures that you have been looking for your projects.

  • WordPress 5.3 Release Candidate

    The first release candidate for WordPress 5.3 is now available!

    This is an important milestone as we progress toward the WordPress 5.3 release date. “Release Candidate” means that the new version is ready for release, but with millions of users and thousands of plugins and themes, it’s possible something was missed. WordPress 5.3 is currently scheduled to be released on November 12, 2019, but we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.3 yet, now is the time!

Server: Knative, Puppet, Kubectl and EdgeX Foundry

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Server
  • Google's Keeping Knative Development Under Its Thumb 'For the Foreseeable Future'

    In addition to Knative, which is for deploying serverless workloads, Google evidently plans to keep the Kubernetes service mesh, Istio, in-house.

  • Puppet’s New Cloud Native Continuous Delivery Tool Builds on the CDF’s Tekton [Ed: It says: "The Linux Foundation, Puppet, and Red Hat are sponsors of The New Stack." Read as: we're being paid to write this article by the subject of this article.]

    Puppet has released into public beta its Project Nebula, a cloud native tool that connects a DevOps team’s existing toolset into an end-to-end, continuous delivery platform. The company aims to simplify deployment of microservices and serverless-based applications by connecting popular tools for infrastructure provisioning, application deployment, and notifications into a single, automated workflow.

    “There are a few folks in the world who believe in one tool that solves all the problems. And then there are folks who believe in best-of-breed and pulling the right tools for the right job with the right people, and the right culture,” said Matthew Young, senior director of product management at Puppet. “And we’re really going after the latter… We are not trying to replace every other tool.”

  • Kubectl and friends as a snap

    At Canonical, we build solutions to simplify the lives of our users. We want to reduce complexity, costs, and barriers to entry. When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) and MicroK8s, we made sure it aligned with our mission. We built snaps like kubectl for various Kubernetes clients and services to ensure a harmonious ecosystem.

    From user feedback, requests and going over the exciting use cases our users and partners are experimenting with, sometimes you just need to get up and running. Kubernetes on a Raspberry Pi anyone? This is why we provide Kubernetes components such as kubectl, kubefed, kubeadm, etc. as snaps and open to use for your use cases.

  • EdgeX Foundry Organizes Its First Hackathon

    The project organized its first hackathon in Chicago to see how the retail industry leverages EdgeX Foundry to solve some of its pressing problems.

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Programming/Development: Dirk Eddelbuettel, Dependencies and Python

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.9.800.3.0

    A small Armadillo bugfix upstream update 9.800.3 came out a few days ago. The changes, summarised by Conrad in email to me (and for once not yet on the arma site are fixes for matrix row iterators, better detection of non-hermitian matrices by eig_sym(), inv_sympd(), chol(), expmat_sym() and miscellaneous minor fixes. It also contains a bug fix by Christian Gunning to his sample() implementation. Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 679 other packages on CRAN.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RDieHarder 0.2.1

    A new version, now at 0.2.1, of the random-number generator tester RDieHarder (based on the DieHarder suite developed / maintained by Robert Brown with contributions by David Bauer and myself) is now on CRAN. This version has only internal changes. Brian Ripley, tireless as always, is testing the impact of gcc 10 on CRAN code and found that the ‘to-be-default’ option -fno-common throws off a few (older) C code bases, this one (which is indeed old) included. So in a nutshell, we declared all global variables extern and defined them once and only once in new file globals.c. Needless to say, this affects the buildability options. In the past we used to rely on an external library libdieharder (which e.g. I had put together for Debian) but we now just build everything internally in the package.

  • There are (at least) three distinct dependency types

    Using dependencies is one of the main problems in software development today. It has become even more complicated with the recent emergence of new programming languages and the need to combine them with existing programs. Most discussion about it has been informal and high level, so let's see if we can make it more disciplined and how different dependency approaches work. What do we mean when we say "work"? In this post we are going to use the word "work" in a very specific way. A dependency application is said to work if and only if we can take two separate code projects where one uses the other and use them together without needing to write special case code. That is, we should be able to snap the two projects together like Lego. If this can be done to arbitrary projects with a success rate of more than 95%, then the approach can be said to work. It should be especially noted that "I tried this with two trivial helloworld projects and it worked for me" does not fulfill the requirements of working. Sadly this line of reasoning is used all too often in online dependency discussions, but it is not a response that holds any weight. Any approach that has not been tested with at least tens (preferably hundreds) of packages does not have enough real world usage experience to be taken seriously.

  • Monads aren't as hard as you think

    I’ve been scared of monads ever since I first heard of them. So many references to burritos, or nuclear waste containers, or some other analogy that didn’t make sense to me. So if you’re scared of monads too, maybe my take on what a monad is will help.

  • Print all git repos from a user
  • Print all git repos from a user
  • Talk Python to Me: #241 Opal: Full stack health care apps

    Open source has permeated much of the software industry. What about health care? This highly regulated and important industry might seem to be the domain of huge specialized software companies.

  • Sleepy snake

    I love this drawing! I’ve always been charmed by cartoonists’ ability to capture an essence in a seemingly simple drawing. Objects are reduced to stereotypes, but with some whimsy thrown in. Ben has always had this gift: to create just the right stroke to perfectly express an attitude or feeling. Here Sleepy is snug in his bed, covered by a blanket. Even in his custom bed, he’s too long to fit, but he’s comfortable. The pillow isn’t shaped like a real pillow, but it’s exactly our cartoon Platonic ideal of a pillow.

  • Generate a Python Random Number

    Here is a quick guide on Python’s random number. You can always refer to it whenever you need to generate a random number in your programs. Python has a built-in random module for this purpose. It exposes several methods such as randrange(), randint(), random(), seed(), uniform(), etc. You can call any of these functions to generate a Python random number. Usually, a random number is an integer, but you can generate float random also. However, you first need to understand the context as a programmer and then pick the right function to use.

  • Trigger Local Python App Remotely

    With an old Mac I have lying around at home and free web-based services, I’ve setup a simple app that fetches some data from an external service (YNAB) in order to run some daily budget calculations that I used to calculate manually for a long time. The output of my app is then sent back to my phone within seconds so I can trigger it from anywhere. I wanted to share the approach I’m using which has cost me nothing. This (obviously) isn’t an approach that should be used for large scale applications or anything other than pet projects. I just wanted to highlight how simple it can be using existing free tools. There are plenty of low cost, production ready, and scalable options out there (like AWS Lambda) if you prefer to start with that approach. My app is written in Python and served via Flask to a local endpoint (http://localhost:5000) which ngrok points to. I then have a IFTTT webhook hitting the Ngrok URL after clicking an IFTTT button widget from my phone. The app ends up broadcasting the output to my Slack account so I end up getting a push notification on my phone containing the app output within seconds of hitting the button:

  • Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping Guide 2019

    Stuck for what to buy your friends and family this Christmas? Whether you’re looking to introduce someone to Raspberry Pi and coding, or trying to find the perfect gift for the tech-mad hobbyist in your life, our Christmas Shopping Guide 2019 will help you complete your shopping list. So, let’s get started…

Some Free Sticky Notes Applications For Ubuntu Linux!

Sticky notes application is one application that looks trivial but is very useful. This application is usually used to note something. We can choose several Sticky Notes applications below to be used on Ubuntu and other linux distributions!. Read more

Graphics: RADV, Wayland's Weston 8.0 Reaches Alpha, Mesa 20.0

  • RADV's ACO Compiler Back-End Now Supported For Older AMD "Sea Islands" GPUs

    The Valve-backed "ACO" compiler back-end for the open-source Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver has added support now for AMD GCN 1.1 "Sea Islands" graphics cards. Sea Islands includes the Radeon Rx 200 series with the R7 260/260X/290/295 series and these 2nd Gen GCN GPUs also ended up in the Radeon HD 7790, Radeon HD 8770, Radeon R7 360, Radeon R9 390/390X, and Radeon RX 455. Up to now the ACO compiler back-end has only supported GCN1.2/GFX8 and newer but with the latest Mesa 20.0-devel code as of today in Mesa Git there is now ACO support for GCN 1.1 Sea Islands.

  • Wayland's Weston 8.0 Reaches Alpha With EGL Partial Updates, Headless OpenGL

    Weston 8.0 is another significant update for this Wayland reference compositor in it offers EGL_KHR_partial_update support to reduce GPU vRAM usage on supported drivers/GPUs thanks to handling partial screen updates, support for building the DRM back-end without Mesa's GBM, greater hardware planes usage, the Weston headless back-end now supports OpenGL, a direct display extension, HDCP support in the DRM back-end, and various other improvements / features.

  • weston 7.0.91
    This is the alpha release for weston 8.0. Here is a highlight of the
    main new features:
    
    - DRM hardware planes should be used more effectively
    - Headless backend now supports OpenGL
    - DRM backend can now be built without GBM
    - EGL_KHR_partial_update is now used when available, reducing memory
      bandwidth usage on some GPUs
    - Logging framework improvements
    - Documentation for weston can now be built
    
    A lot of fixes have been merged too. Thanks to all contributors!
    
    Full commit history below.
    
    Adam Jackson (5):
          simple-dmabuf-egl: Allow QueryDmaBufModifiers to report no modifiers
          gl-renderer: Fix possible memory leak when no dmabuf modifers are supported
          libweston: Fix integer underflow in weston_layer_mask_is_infinite
          image-loader: Fix undefined left shift in premultiply_data
          tests: Fix undefined left shift in internal-screenshot-test
    
    Ankit Nautiyal (6):
          backend-drm: Add support for content-protection
          libweston: Add functions to modify disable_planes counter for an output
          libweston: Add function to schedule idle task for updating surface protection
          libweston: Notify the client, when output recording is started/stopped
          man: Declare drm-backend support for HDCP
          backend-drm: Check for HDCP Content Type property before setting
    
    Daniel Stone (8):
          renderer-gl: Assert function presence matches extensions
          remoting: Use DRM FourCC formats instead of GBM formats
          Revert "backend-drm: Teach drm_property_info_populate() to retrieve range values"
          config-parser: Export get_full_path and destroy
          backend-drm: Use aspect-ratio bit definitions from libdrm
          config-parser: Make get_bool be bool
          tests/config-parser: Remove useless duplicate test
          option-parser: Make bools boolean
    
    Drew DeVault (1):
          simple-dmabuf-egl: update to xdg-shell stable
    
    Eero Tamminen (1):
          Add include for missing symbols
    
    Emmanuel Gil Peyrot (1):
          shared: Use memfd_create() when available
    
    Harish Krupo (3):
          gl-renderer: Censor protected views when output is recorded
          clients/window: Add viewport destination support
          desktop-shell: Set 1x1 buffers for solid-color backgrounds
    
    Jeffy Chen (2):
          clients: Drop corresponding touch points when destroying windows
          clients: Add more sanity checks to catch destroyed window
    
    Leandro Ribeiro (11):
          build: bump libdrm requirement to newer version (2.4.83)
          backend-drm: remove unecessary ifdef checks
          backend-drm: remove unnecessary ifdefs
          move frame_signal emission to weston_output_repaint()
          screenshooter: stop using frame_signal void *data parameter to get weston_output
          tests: stop using frame_signal 'void *data' argument to get weston_output
          renderer: change frame_signal emission to pass previous_damage as data argument
          screenshooter: get previous_damage from data argument instead of weston_output
          screen-share: get previous_damage from data argument instead of weston_output
          Revert "move frame_signal emission to weston_output_repaint()"
          libweston: remove previous_damage from struct weston_output
    
    Link Mauve (1):
          xwayland: Remove unused variable
    
    Loïc Yhuel (1):
          libweston: fix possible crash after a view is removed the layer
    
    Marius Vlad (53):
          weston-log: s/scope/sub, leftover from the logging framework
          libweston: Fix rename of weston_compositor_destroy() reference
          weston-log: 'new_subscriber' is actually 'new_subscription'
          weston-log: Add 'destroy_subscription' callback for the subscription
          weston-log-internal: Allow to hang-off data over the subscription
          weston-log: Add a subscription iterator
          libweston: Clean-up timeline to make room for a new approach
          libweston: Introduce timeline subscription and timeline subscription object
          libweston: Create the 'timeline' scope
          libweston: Convert timeline points to use the timeline scope
          libweston: Notify timeline of object modification
          libweston: Remove timeline-object and clean-up
          doc/sphinx: Add some documentation about timeline points
          compositor: Allow protocol to be displayed when asked for, even if we're not supplying debug argument
          libweston: Init weston_output's 'destroy_signal' before timeline has a chance to emit a
          compositor: Pass the entire string in one-shot when writting logger data
          weston-log: Avoid prefix-matching the scope name when checking for a
          backend-drm: Teach drm_property_info_populate() to retrieve range values
          backend-drm: Teach drm_property_info_populate() to retrieve range values
          backend-drm: Add zpos DRM-property
          backend-drm: Add a helper to display plane type as a 'string'
          backend-drm: Hard-code zpos values if HW doesn't exposes them
          libweston: Add a new helper weston_view_has_valid_buffer
          libweston: Add a new helper to check if the view spawns the entire
          backend-drm: Construct a zpos candidate list of planes
          backend-drm: Place pixel format checks for the overlay plane in its own
          backend-drm: Place pixel format checks for the cursor plane in its own
          backend-drm: Check pixel format before constructing the zpos candidate list
          backend-drm: Allow for views to reach overlays/underlays planes
          backend-drm: Pass the plane to prepare_overlay_view
          backend-drm: Pass the drm_fb to each prepare_overlay/scanout_view functions
          backend-drm: Move plane's availability in drm_output_try_view_on_plane()
          backend-drm: Print whenever a view will reach the renderer region
          backend-drm: Print whenever a view could not placed on the primary due to
          compositor: Fix some warning when passing debugoptimized to meson
          protocol: Add weston-direct-display extension
          libweston: Add weston-direct-display server side implementation
          libweston: Add the ability to determine if a dmabuf is scanout-capable
          backend-drm: Add dmabuf scan-out check for DRM-backend
          renderer-gl: Avoid retrieving the EGL image it direct_display flag was set
          renderer-gl: Display a solid shader color when direct-display is in use
          clients/simple-dmabuf-egl: Make use of direct-display
          clients/simple-dmabuf-drm: Make use of direct-display
          backend-drm: Assign the primary plane the lowest zpos value
          backend-drm: Skip testing plane state if plane is not enabled
          backend-drm: Turn zpos duplicate check into an hard assert
          backend-drm: Further checks to skip plane assignment to HW planes
          weston-log-flight-rec: Add a global variable to access the ring buffer
          weston-log-flight-rec: Don't allow more than one flight recorder to be
          weston-log-flight-rec: Fix useless comparison when displaying the
          doc/scripts/gdb: Added gdb script to dump contents of the flight recorder
          clients/fullscreen: Refuse to resize the surface size when fullscreen'ed
          gitlab-ci: Update ci-templates to latest SHA commit
    
    Miguel A. Vico (2):
          desktop-shell: Avoid NULL output dereference when getting surface label
          compositor: Do not trigger invalid destructors when hotunplugging
    
    Nicholas Niro (2):
          backend-drm: Fix for gbm modifiers when they are not available.
          backend-drm: Added support for legacy fd_import
    
    Olivier Fourdan (1):
          xwm: Use Xwayland allow commits for repaint
    
    Pekka Paalanen (73):
          backend-headless: fix comment on use_pixman
          backend-headless: refactor into headless_output_enable_pixman
          backend-headless: refactor into headless_output_disable_pixman
          backend-headless: make renderer type an enum
          clients: fix len-string formatting
          gl_renderer: remove unused NO_EGL_PLATFORM
          gl-renderer: fix typo native_window to native_display
          gl-renderer: remove platform_attribs
          gl-renderer: remove gl_renderer_display
          gl-renderer: remove gl_renderer_output_surface
          gl-renderer: remove print_egl_error_state
          backend-drm: use format db for fallback too
          gl-renderer: move into egl-glue.c
          gl_renderer: introduce gl_renderer_get_egl_config()
          gl-renderer: use gl_renderer_get_egl_config() for display_create
          gl-renderer: do not even pick a config with configless_context
          pixel-formats: add RGBA bits and type fields
          gl-renderer: use pixel_format_info internally for EGL
          gl-renderer: fuzzy EGLConfig matching for non-GBM
          backend-wayland: use DRM formats for EGLConfig
          backend-x11: use DRM formats for EGLConfig
          gl-renderer: remove EGLConfig attributes from API
          gl-renderer: configs for pbuffers too
          gl-renderer: pbuffer config for non-surfaceless
          gl-renderer: prefer the base EGLConfig
          gl-renderer: improve get_egl_config errors
          gl-renderer: print detailed EGLConfig list
          gl-renderer: use EGLConfig printer for window outputs
          build: shells do not need matrix.c
          build: use dependency for matrix.c
          xwm: dnd does not need cairo-util.h
          Unify the include style of shared/ headers
          build: simplify include_directories
          xwm: no need for compositor/weston.h
          gl-renderer: display_create needs surface type
          gl-renderer: document display_create
          gl-renderer: document output_window_create
          gl-renderer: add EGL surfaceless platform support
          noop-renderer: zero-initialize struct
          headless, gl-renderer: support pbuffer outputs
          compositor: add use-gl option to headless
          gitlab-ci: fix pages
          build: separate deps for int and ext libweston users
          build: link libm explicitly
          build: link libdl explicitly to DRM backend
          backend-x11: need libdrm headers in build
          build: reduce sub-dependencies of libweston
          compositor: turn weston main() into a lib
          cms-colord: work around unresolved symbols
          backend-rdp: work around unresolved symbols
          Link Weston plugins to libexec-weston.so
          tests: surface-screenshot needs libshared
          build: do not allow unresolved symbols
          libweston: drop a misleading dmabuf comment
          tests: remove static data from viewporter
          tests: remove static data from ivi-layout-test-plugin
          tests: remove static data from ivi-shell-app-test
          tests: remove static data from ivi-layout-test-client
          tests: remove static data from presentation
          tests: fix test-shell init error path
          ivi-shell: fix init error path
          colord: remove destroy listener on clean-up
          Use weston_compositor_add_destroy_listener_once() in plugins
          libweston: allow double-loading modules
          compositor: allow double-loading modules
          tests: write image to current directory by default
          tests/subsurface-shot: hardcode reference image names
          tests: replace fprintf() with testlog()
          tests/xwayland: do not call exit(SUCCESS)
          tests: rename struct weston_test to weston_test_entry
          tests/ivi: rename test_section
          tests: drop FAIL_TEST
          libweston: do not include weston.h
    
    Sebastian Wick (7):
          shared: add read-only anonymous file abstraction
          CI: build wayland from source
          input: bump wl_seat version to 6
          clients/window: bump wl_seat version to 6
          input: bump wl_seat version to 7
          clients/window: bump wl_seat version to 7
          input: use ro_anonymous_file to minimize duplication of keymap files
    
    Simon Ser (4):
          build: reopen master for regular development
          clients: drop simple-dmabuf-drm
          clients: remove leftover from simple-dmabuf-drm
          build: bump to version 7.0.91 for the alpha release
    
    Stefan Agner (10):
          backend-rdp: don't use shadow buffer for the RDP backend
          backend-headless: fix build issue without gl-renderer
          clients: avoid build error without gl-renderer
          gitlab-ci: add build configuration without gl-renderer
          backend-drm: use DRM_ constants everywhere
          remoting: make sure GL renderer is enabled
          backend-drm: separate out DRM virtual support
          backend-drm: make GBM optional
          weston-launch: show when a signal is sent to a child
          weston-launch: use exec to ensure signal delivery
    
    Veeresh Kadasani (1):
          simple-dmabuf-egl: make application generic
    
    Vivek Kasireddy (2):
          gl-renderer: Replace EGL_*_WL macros with locally defined enums
          gl-renderer: Add support for XYUV format (v2)
    
    sichem (1):
          libweston: Bring back 'weston_output_move'
    
    git tag: 7.0.91
    
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Now Includes Intel's Gallium3D Driver To Build By Default

    As part of the ongoing effort for Intel's plans to use their new Gallium3D OpenGL Linux driver by default on next quarter's Mesa 20.0 for Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer, another step in that direction was achieved on Friday. Intel's "Iris" Gallium3D driver is still making good progress in its goal for Mesa 20.0 to switch the default "i965" classic driver to Intel Gallium3D for Broadwell and newer hardware. Earlier this week was adding a build-time option to change the Intel OpenGL driver default so those building from source or distribution vendors can change the default on their own with ease.

Linux 5.5+ Development

  • GRUB Now Supports Btrfs 3/4-Copy RAID1 Profiles (RAID1C3 / RAID1C4 On Linux 5.5+)

    When it comes to the storage/file-system changes with the in-development Linux 5.5 kernel one of the most prominent end-user-facing changes is more robust RAID1 for Btrfs with the ability to have three or four copies of the data rather than just two copies, should data safety be of utmost importance and concerned over the possibility of two disks in an array failing. The Btrfs "RAID1C3" mode was merged last week for this three/four-copy RAID1 while now the GRUB boot-loader has adapted support for these new profiles in order to be able to boot to said arrays.

  • Linux 5.5 Adds NFS Client Support For Cross-Device Offloaded Copies (Server To Server)

    With NFSv4.2 is the server-side copy (SSC) functionality with the Linux 5.5 kernel's NFS client-side support for that support in allowing "inter" copy offloads between different NFS servers. This support allows for server-to-server efficient file copies with NFSv4.2 SSC rather than first having to copy to the client system. The NFS client changes also introduce new RDMA tracepoints for debugging congestion control and various other fixes.

  • Linux 5.5 KVM Adds POWER Support For Secure Guests/VMs

    IBM's work from over a year ago in working towards secure virtual machines on POWER hardware is finally coming to fruition with Linux 5.5 due out early next year. After those original Secure Virtual Machine POWER9 patches were posted last year, the ultravisor / secure bits landed in Linux 5.4 in preparing the foundation. As explained in that earlier article, "The Ultravisor / SVM support is part of IBM's approach for protected computing that is akin to the approaches of Intel SGX and AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV). IBM's Ultravisor code runs with higher privileges than the virtualization hypervisor and in turn the virtual machines rely upon IBM Protected Execution for verifying the behavior of the hypervisor/ultravisor."