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Server: CephFS and Container News

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  • What you should know about CephFS

    Today, new storage system interfaces are created regularly to resolve emerging challenges in distributed storage. For example, Amazon Simple Storage Service [S3] (an opaque object store) and Amazon Elastic Block Storage [EBS] (a virtual machine image provider) both provide an essential, scalable storage service within a cloud ecosystem; however even with these new technologies, the conventional file system remains the most-widely used storage interface in computing.

    Virtually all programs are written to use a file system at some level. This makes the file system the lingua franca for all storage access on any computing device—from small devices such as smartphones, to large high-performance computing (HPC) clusters at CERN and national labs. Programs are still written to communicate and store data through file systems because of their convenience, familiarity, and interoperability.

  • Finding a digital transformation roadmap with containers

    But to make containers actually work, you need to use them in the right way. Creating a digital transformation roadmap with containers is not as simple as installing Docker and letting everything else fall into place on its own.

  • DH2i Adds Docker Support to App Portability Platform for Windows and Linux
  • DH2i Launches DxEnterprise v17 - Unified Smart Availability™ for Windows, Linux & Docker

Server: Serverless, Containers, and SysAdmin Careers

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  • This Week in Numbers: Serverless Adoption on Par with Containers

    Serverless technologies like functions as a service (FaaS) are in use by 43 percent of enterprises that both have a significant number of strategic workloads running in the public cloud workloads and the ability to dynamically manage them.

    Without those qualifications, it is easy to misinterpret the findings from New Relic’s survey-based ebook “Achieving Serverless Success with Dynamic Cloud and DevOps.” After digging in, we found that the survey says 70 percent of enterprises have migrated a significant number of workloads to the public cloud. Among this group, 39 percent of using serverless, 40 percent are using containers and 34 percent are using container orchestration.

  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Configuration and Automation

    System administrators looking to differentiate themselves from the pack are increasingly getting cloud computing certification or picking up skills with configuration management tools. From Puppet, to Chef to Ansible, powerful configuration management tools can arm sysadmins with new skills such as cloud provisioning, application monitoring and management, and countless types of automation.

    Configuration management platforms and tools have converged directly with the world of open source. In fact, several of the best tools are fully free and open source. From server orchestration to securely delivering high-availability applications, open source tools such as Chef and Puppet can bring organizations enormous efficiency boosts.

Docker Pivots to Proprietary

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Server: NASA, Kubernetes at GitHub, and Docker in Mainframes

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  • NASA Launches Supercomputer Servers into Space

    During that time, it will run a series of supercomputing benchmarks, including High Performance Linpack, the High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) suite, and the NASA-derived NAS parallel benchmarks. Its operation will be compared to HPE servers of the same construction back on Earth. The idea is to make sure that the ISS-based system is able to deal with the realities of cosmic radiation, solar flares, unstable electrical power, and wide variations in temperature.

  • Kubernetes at GitHub

    Over the last year, GitHub has gradually evolved the infrastructure that runs the Ruby on Rails application responsible for github.com and api.github.com. We reached a big milestone recently: all web and API requests are served by containers running in Kubernetes clusters deployed on our metal cloud. Moving a critical application to Kubernetes was a fun challenge, and we’re excited to share some of what we’ve learned with you today.

  • Docker Can Now Containerize Legacy Apps Running on Mainframes

    Docker this week announced the first update to its rebranded flagship platform with the release of Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 17.06. Back in March, Docker rolled out the first Docker EE, built on the backs of what had been known as Docker Commercially Supported and Docker Datacenter.

    The new release comes on the heels of a report last week from Bloomberg that the container company has been raising money, which will result in $75 million dollars being added to its coffers by the end of the month, bringing with it a new valuation of $1.3 billion — up $300 million from its previous valuation.

CoreOS Tectonic 1.7

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  • CoreOS Tectonic 1.7 Improves Container Orchestration Platform

    Container management vendor CoreOS today released the latest update of its Tectonic platform, bringing the open-source Kubernetes based system to Microsoft's Azure cloud. The Tectonic 1.7 release is based on the upstream Kubernetes 1.7 project update that debuted at the end of June.

    Kubernetes started off as a Google open-source effort and became the cornerstone project of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. Kubernetes like other container technologies initially started off as a Linux-only platform but is now finding its way to Microsoft Azure thanks to the efforts of organizations like CoreOS. Microsoft's own Azure Container Service (ACS) added support for Kubernetes in February.

  • CoreOS extends Kubernetes to Microsoft Azure

Docker/Containers/Kubernetes

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Services/Servers/Containers News

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MongoDB Seeking IPO

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OSS

Server Leftovers

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  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Looking to the Cloud

    Sysadmins will always need core competencies such as networking and security, but increasingly, they can differentiate themselves by mastering new platforms and tools. Previously in this series, we've provided an overview of essentials, evolving network skills, and security. In this article, we'll look at how experience with open cloud computing platforms such as OpenStack can make a difference in your sysadmin career.

  • Top 5 container mistakes that cause security problems

    Given that many companies are still wrapping their arms around the potential of container technology and how to best leverage it, there is still a lot of experimentation with containers.

    Developers are working in their own sandboxes, setting them up on their laptops and then putting them into production. The issue, though, is that if containers are done without security measures in mind, you may not have the agility you want with the right controls.

    As a result, unknown content can end up in containers, even with today's growing marketing container tools. Kristen Newcomer, security strategist at RedHat, says before putting containers into production, you need to ask, "What’s the right process to manage this? How do I make sure things are controlled and managed as I would any other application?"

  • Time, Security Cited as Hurdles to Adoption of Containers

    Containers remain a nascent cloud platform choice for many enterprises. But lack of ecosystem maturity and familiarity are seen as early-stage hurdles toward adoption.

    Dustin Kirkland, VP of product at Canonical who’s on the company’s Ubuntu products and strategy team, said one of the biggest issues facing container adoption today is simply time. Containers are still relatively new in the eyes of enterprise customers who have only recently come to understand the benefits of virtual machines (VMs).

  • 4 container adoption patterns: What you need to know

    At this time of digital transformation, it’s crystal clear why today’s businesses desire speed. When a rival uses technology to make an unexpected move, or makes a big acquisition, you must react quickly. For example, the recent Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods demands fast action from supermarket competitors. To achieve that kind of business speed, IT leaders want to flip the 80/20 paradigm, where IT traditionally spent 80 percent of its budget on maintenance and 20 percent on innovation. CIOs seek to allocate more budget to help the business be agile and nimble.

Docker IPO Rumours

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  • From startup to an open source giant. Docker valuation hits $1.3bn amid fresh funding round

    Open source software startup Docker Inc. is currently working on raising $75m as its software business grows, according to sources.

    People familiar with the matter told Bloomberg the round is expected to close by the end of this month, which will push the company’s valuation to $1.3bn, up from $1bn in 2015.

    One of the people said the raised cash will be invested in expanding Docker Inc.’s sales and marketing teams for corporate clients.

  • Startup funding: Open source software Docker raises fund to fuel its newest push

    According to Silicon Angle, the latest investment will help fuel the company’s newest push in the computing market. The company plans to use the fresh capital to beef up its sales and marketing muscles.

    The funding news follows a massive management shuffle, which reportedly involved former CEO of Concur Technologies Steve Singh and Docker’s co-founder Solomon Hykes.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.