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Kubernetes News

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  • Operating a Kubernetes network

    I’ve been working on Kubernetes networking a lot recently. One thing I’ve noticed is, while there’s a reasonable amount written about how to set up your Kubernetes network, I haven’t seen much about how to operate your network and be confident that it won’t create a lot of production incidents for you down the line.

  • How to make the case for Kubernetes

    Kubernetes isn’t even easy to pronounce, much less explain. So we recently illuminated how to demystify Kubernetes in plain English, so that a wide audience can understand it. (We also noted that the pronunciation may vary a bit, and that’s OK.)

  • Heptio Debuts Contour Project to Enable Kubernetes Envoy Load Balancing

    The Envoy open-source project was originally developed by ride-sharing service Lyft and officially became a Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) project on Sept. 13. The CNCF is the home multiple open-source efforts, including the Kubernetes container orchestration platform.

GNU/Linux Servers: IBM and Red Hat

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  • IBM Wheels And Deals For Power Linux, But Where Is IBM i?

    The whole point of the convergence of the RS/6000 and the AS/400 families of systems – including pSeries and iSeries and System p and System i – was not only to get a common, converged hardware platform that made IBM’s life easier, but to also – or so we have always believed – give a consistent deal to customers using AIX or OS/400-i5/OS-IBM i.

    “A foolish consistency is,” as Ralph Waldo Emerson put it, “the hobgoblin of little minds.” While that may be true, a smart consistency is the Spider-Man of great minds. Or at least those that think alike. Like we all do out here in IBM i Land.

    IBM i customers need a deal, something to get them excited about modernizing their platforms and moving ahead.

  • HCL announces enterprise platform services powered by Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

    HCL Technologies announced a collaboration with Red Hat to offer HCL Application Platform-as-a-Service to enterprise customers globally.

    At 12:35 hrs HCL Technologies was quoting at Rs 846.05, down Rs 11.65, or 1.36 percent.
    The share touched its 52-week high Rs 941.00 and 52-week low Rs 786.05 on 23 October, 2017 and 15 November, 2016, respectively.

  • Why I love technical debt

Servers and Red Hat, Fedora

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Servers: PaaS, Containers, SUSE, and Fedora

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  • Platform-as-a-Service: The Key to Running a Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    A six-year veteran of continuously deploying swarms of microservices to various Platform-as-a-Service environments, Ben Dodd kicked off a recent London Continuous Delivery Meetup by asking: What is the relationship you want to have with your Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS)?

    Using the following metaphor of “Pizza-as-a-Service,” he says you’re only supposed to concentrate on what you want to accomplish, only focusing on the immediate task at hand: “Only care about our pizza, everything else is someone else’s concern.”

  • But I don't know what a container is

    I've been speaking about security in DevOps—also known as "DevSecOps"*—at a few conferences and seminars recently, and I've started to preface the discussion with a quick question: "Who here understands what a container is?" Usually I don't see many hands going up,**  so I've started briefly explaining what containers*** are before going much further.

    To be clear: You can do DevOps without containers, and you can do DevSecOps without containers. But containers lend themselves so well to the DevOps approach—and to DevSecOps, it turns out—that even though it's possible to do DevOps without them, I'm going to assume that most people will use containers.

  • A World without Open Source? [Ed: SUSE never heard of GNU and Free software. History started in 1991.]

    Open source opens a space for bright ideas and the accomplishment of projects – together. The most impressive example is probably the history of Linux. Starting in 1991 as the invention of Finnish student Linus Torvalds, today Linux is the foundation for many of our everyday tools: from operating systems for PCs and servers (such as SUSE or Debian) to smart-phones (Android) and other mobile devices.

  • IBM Cloud to get SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications
  • Fedora 27 Isn't Ready For Release, Fedora Modular Server Pushed Back To December

    Open blocker bugs are preventing Fedora 27 from being released next week.

    Even after the Fedora 27 Beta delays, developers were trying hard to get F27 out on time, but that simply isn't going to happen this cycle. At today's Go/No-Go meeting, they decided it will be delayed at least one week.

    There are still a few open blocker bugs and as such will have another meeting next Thursday to see if it's ready for release at that point.

  • Bodhi 3.0.0 released.

Servers: Containers, OPNFV, 'DevOps', Xen

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  • Containers will oust VMs and storage arrays, says Red Hat

    Red Hat launches storage delivered via containers and predicts a future in which costly and inflexible storage hardware and pricey hypervisors will be a thing of the past

  • OPNFV Euphrates Debuts Providing Kubernetes Integration

    The OPNFV Euphrates release is the fifth since the project was initially launchedin September 2014. "Euphrates brings a deeper level of maturity to the platform," Tapio Tallgren, chair of Technical Steering Committee (TSC), OPNFV, and lead software architect, Nokia’s Mobile Architecture Unit stated.

    When OPNFV first launched containers were in their infancy and so too was the Kubernetes container orchestration project, but that's no longer the case in October 2017. One of the key new features in OPNFV Euphrates is integration with container technologies, including Kubernetes.

  • What's your DevOps problem?

    Back in August, Jason Hibbets asked whether I had any interest in building a DevOps community on Opensource.com. The obvious answer was an astounding YES! Jason and I have assembled a fantastic consortium of DevOps minds to write on Opensource.com. But, one thing I've always wanted was a way to ask smart people hard questions and get an actual answer. Joining this DevOps community and my desire to get help led to the idea for a Dear DevOps community column.

  • Xen 4.10 RC1 Now Available For Testing

    The first release candidate is now available for the upcoming Xen 4.10 hypervisor update.

    Among the changes being worked on the past several months for the Xen 4.10 hypervisor are NVIDIA Tegra SoC support, Xen transport for the 9pfs back-end, various para-virtualized driver updates, memory bandwidth allocation and L2 cache allocation technology support.

Container OS Options and CoreOS Review

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  • Container OS options abound: Make the right choice

    When matching a container OS to a host OS, consider interoperability, but also be realistic in the overall enterprise application set. Some organizations maintain a cadre of Microsoft Windows Server applications for aspects such as productivity support while they build out a Linux presence. These IT teams should focus on Linux OS options to match that shifting development focus. Select an easy-to-work-with container OS that will ease the transition from Windows Server.

  • CoreOS review: Linux for containers and Kubernetes [Ed: Site/network locks reviews behind paywalls now]

    CoreOS Container Linux is an open-source container operating system designed to support Kubernetes. The CoreOS flavor of container infrastructure management uses the Rocket or Docker container engine, Etcd for service discovery and configuration, Flannel for networking, and Kubernetes for container management. Unique among container operating systems, CoreOS offers a continuous stream of automated updates that, in theory, do not affect running applications. That’s because they run in containers.

Servers: Kubernetes in plain English, Serverless, Staging

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  • How to explain Kubernetes in plain English

    Talk containers with an IT pro for more than a minute and the conversation will inevitably turn to container management and orchestration.

    It might be easy to deploy a container, but operationalizing containers at scale — especially in concert with microservices — is not for weekend enthusiasts. It requires planning, and most experts say an orchestration tool is a must.

  • The Trouble With Promises: Patrick Debois Explains Serverless And 'Service-Full' Culture
  • Center stage: Best practices for staging environments

    We’re talking about staging because no one talks about it. It’s mentioned in passing as the annoying sidekick to production. It’s the expected and completely necessary part of the deployment cycle barely touched by schools or internships. It’s considered such an obvious part of architecture that no one mentions it, no one details it, many people do it wrong—and some don’t do it at all.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

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  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security

    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market.

    To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.

  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS

    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments.

    The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.

  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict

    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach.

    Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system.

    In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.

  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate

    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ.

    Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.

Servers: Containers, 'Cloud', Microservices, and Hyperledger

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  • How to Choose a Linux Container Image

    A comparison of Linux container images talks about the best-practices in choosing an image. Architecture, security and performance are among the factors, while commercial users would also look for support options.

    A Linux container allows separate management of kernel space and user space components by utilizing cgroups and namespaces, which are resource and process isolation mechanisms. Solaris and BSD also have abstractions similar to Linux containers but the article's focus is on the latter only. The host running the container has the operating system kernel and a set of libraries and tools required to run containers. The container image, on the other hand, has the libraries, interpreters and application code required to run the application that is being distributed in the container. These depend on underlying system libraries. This is true for interpreted languages too as the interpreters themselves are written in low level languages.

  • The Four Pillars of Cloud-Native Operations

    As organizations shift their application strategies to embrace the cloud-native world, the purpose of the cloud transitions from saving money to delivering and managing applications. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Docker redefine the possibilities for application environments that utilize the cloud. It’s time for us as operations professionals to rethink how we approach our jobs in this new world. We should be asking, how do our organizations take advantage of cloud-native as a new mode of application delivery?

  • How to align your team around microservices

    Microservices have been a focus across the open source world for several years now. Although open source technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Swarm make it easier than ever for organizations to adopt microservice architectures, getting your team on the same page about microservices remains a difficult challenge.

    For a profession that stresses the importance of naming things well, we've done ourselves a disservice with microservices. The problem is that that there is nothing inherently "micro" about microservices. Some can be small, but size is relative and there's no standard measurement unit across organizations. A "small" service at one company might be 1 million lines of code, but far fewer at another organization.

  • Hyperledger Stitches in Another Blockchain Project

    The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, which works on blockchain technologies, added a sixth sub project — this one dubbed Quilt.

    Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is an implementation of the Interledger Protocol (ILP), which helps facilitate transactions across ledgers.

  • Chinese Search Giant Baidu Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Consortium

    Chinese search engine giant Baidu has become the latest member of the Linux Foundation-led Hyperledger blockchain consortium.

    In joining the group – which focuses on developing blockchain technologies for enterprises – Baidu will assist the project's efforts alongside other member companies including Accenture, IBM, JP Morgan, R3, Cisco and SAP, among others.

Server: MAAS, OPNFV, 'DevOps', and Docker

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  • MAAS KVM Pods

    OpenStack is the dominant solution in the IaaS space, fueled by the need for reliable, scalable and interoperable private cloud infrastructure to accommodate cloud native applications. Through OpenStack’s open APIs, tenants can easily deploy elaborate virtual (overlay) networks, integrate with a variety of storage backends, even leverage modern hypervisor-like machine containers (LXD) for bare metal performance. Although the tooling allows a full fledged OpenStack deployment on just a single machine, the intrinsic efficiencies that OpenStack’s design promises, materialize at a certain scale — typically at least 12 servers.

  • DevOps for NFV: OPNFV Infrastructure and Continuous Integration

    In this article series, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book. Previously, we provided an introduction to network functions virtualization (NFV), discussed the role of OPNFV in network transformation, and looked at how OPNFV integrates and enhances upstream projects. We continue our series with in-depth insight into the OPNFV DevOps toolchain, hardware labs, continuous integration (CI) pipeline, and deployment tools (installers) from chapters 6 and 7 of the book.  

  • A Chat with Chef about the DevOps Movement and Habitat Builder

    Last week at our annual user conference, Node.js Interactive, we announced several new members to the Node.js Foundation. One of the members that joined is Chef. Chef works with more than a thousand companies around the world to deliver their vision of digital transformation.

    We sat down with the team at Chef to talk about how Node.js fits within the DevOps movement, why they joined the Node.js Foundation, and also about a new offering from the group called Habitat Builder.

  • Why Use Docker with R? A DevOps Perspective

    There have been several blog posts going around about why one would use Docker with R.
    In this post I’ll try to add a DevOps point of view and explain how containerizing
    R is used in the context of the OpenCPU system for building and deploying R servers.

  • Docker on Docker at DockerCon EU 17

    Docker Inc. the company behind the open-source Docker container technology doesn't just build docker, it also used the same technology to power its own services.

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Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.

KStars 2.8.9 is released!

Here comes the last KStars release for 2017! KStars v2.8.9 is available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. Robert Lancaster worked on improving PHD2 support with Ekos. This includes retrieving the guide star image, drift errors and RMS values, among other minor improvements and refactoring of the Ekos PHD2 codebase to support future extensions. Read more

Security: Mirai, Vista 10, Starbucks, and Hacking Team Investigation

  • Mirai IoT Botnet Co-Authors Plead Guilty

    The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday unsealed the guilty pleas of two men first identified in January 2017 by KrebsOnSecurity as the likely co-authors of Mirai, a malware strain that remotely enslaves so-called “Internet of Things” devices such as security cameras, routers, and digital video recorders for use in large scale attacks designed to knock Web sites and entire networks offline (including multiple major attacks against this site).

  • Google Researcher Finds Flaw in Pre-Installed Windows 10 Password Manager
    Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who has previously discovered, reported, and disclosed several major bugs in Windows and its features, came across a new security vulnerability affecting Microsoft users. This time, the flaw exists in the Keeper password manager that comes pre-installed in some Windows 10 versions, with Ormandy explaining that it’s similar to a vulnerability that he discovered in August 2016. “I remember filing a bug a while ago about how they were injecting privileged UI into pages,” Ormandy explained on December 14. “I checked and, they're doing the same thing again with this version,” he continues.
  • Starbucks Wi-Fi Turned People’s Laptops into Cryptocurrency Miners
    The free Wi-Fi that the Buenos Aires Starbucks offers to its customers was being used to mine for cryptocurrency, and what’s worse, it used people’s laptops to do it. The whole thing was discovered by Stensul CEO Noah Dinkin who actually paid a visit to the store and wanted to browse the web using the free Wi-Fi, only to discover that his laptop was unknowingly converted into a cryptocurrency miner. He then turned to Twitter to ask Starbucks if they know about the what he described as bitcoin mining taking place without customers knowing about it. “Hi Starbucks, did you know that your in-store wifi provider in Buenos Aires forces a 10 second delay when you first connect to the wifi so it can mine bitcoin using a customer's laptop? Feels a little off-brand,” he said in his tweet.
  • Italian Prosecutor Makes Request to Close Hacking Team Investigation
    The damaging data breach that exposed the secrets of an infamous surveillance tech company might go unsolved forever. After more than two years, the Italian prosecutor who was investigating the attack on the Milan-based Hacking Team has asked the case to be dismissed, according to multiple sources. On Monday, the Milan prosecutor Alessandro Gobbis sent a notice to the people under investigation informing them that he had sent the judge a request to shut down the investigation, according to a copy of the document obtained by Motherboard.