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Percona Database News

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  • Percona Tunes Monitoring Platform For ‘Living Breathing’ Databases

    Modern enterprises run on information in the form of data, so they buy databases. Databases are nice solid chunky pieces of software that, once installed, neatly store away all the company’s operational and transactional information in easy-to-find predesignated areas… so after initial deployment, they pretty much look after themselves.

    Unfortunately, that’s not quite true. Databases are living breathing things that need to change and adapt to a variety of factors all the time. Here’s a selection of eight popular reasons that your firm’s information backbone might need to change...

  • Percona customers talk about database challenges

    At Percona Live in Amsterdam, the Open Source database company has released details from its latest customer survey. The results are interesting and suggest that the database market is less rigid, stable and predictable than you might think. They also show a propensity for larger customers to have more database instances than staff.

  • Percona details ‘state’ of open source data management

    Open source database management and monitoring services company Percona has laid down its state of open source data management software survey for 2019.

    Surveys are surveys and are generally custom-constructed to be self-serving in one sense or another and so convey a message set in their ‘findings’ that the commissioning body (or in this case company) has wanted to table to media, customers, partners and other related bodies.

    This central truth being so, should we give any credence to Percona’s latest market assessment?

  • Percona packages PostgreSQL alongside existing MySQL and MongoDB products

    PostgreSQL is among the most popular database management systems, but market share is a slippery thing to measure, depending on whether you mean revenue, developer activity, or actual deployed databases.

    The developer-focused StackOverflow puts PostgreSQL second after MySQL, with Microsoft SQL Server third and Oracle way down at 8th. DB-Engines on the other hand, which measures general discussion, puts Oracle top, followed by MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL 4th.

    Open-source company Percona's distribution, announced at its Percona Live event in Amsterdam, is based on PostgreSQL 11.5, supplemented by several extensions. The pg_repack extension reorganises tables with minimal locks. The PostgreSQL Audit Extension (pgaudit) provides tools for audit logs to meet compliance requirements. And backup and restore is provided by the pgBackRest extension.

  • Database Diversity: The Dirt, the Data

    Companies are using an increasingly eclectic mix of databases, a survey of 836 enterprise database users from around the world conducted by Percona reveals — with the vast majority of respondents using more than one type of open-source database.

    The survey comes as the overall database market – worth some $46 billion at the end of 2018 – continues to fragment: there are now over 40 companies with revenues of $100 million-plus in the commercial open-source ecosystem.

  • The state of open source databases in 2019: Multiple Databases, Clouds, and Licenses

    The Open Source Data Management Software Survey was undertaken by Percona, a company offering services for open source databases, to capture usage patterns and opinions of the people who use open source databases. The survey, unveiled today at Percona's Open Source database conference in Amsterdam, included 836 of them from 85 countries, which means it's a good way to get insights.

  • Percona Announces Enhanced Version of Award-Winning Open Source Database Monitoring and Management Platform, For Faster Performance Issue Resolution

Servers: IBM/Red Hat, CentOS, CNCF and SUSE

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  • Microservices, and the Observability Macroheadache

    Moving to a microservice architecture, deployed on a cloud platform such as OpenShift, can have significant benefits. However, it does make understanding how your business requests are being executed, across the potentially large numbers of microservices, more challenging.

    If we wish to locate where problems may have occurred in the execution of a business request, whether due to performance issues or errors, we are potentially faced with accessing metrics and logs associated with many services that may have been involved. Metrics can provide a general indication of where problems have occurred, but not specific to individual requests. Logs may provide errors or warnings, but cannot necessarily be correlated to the individual requests of interest.

    Distributed tracing is a technique that has become indispensable in helping users understand how their business transactions execute across a set of collaborating services. A trace instance documents the flow of a business transaction, including interactions between services, internal work units, relevant metadata, latency details and contextualized logging. This information can be used to perform root cause analysis to locate the problem quickly.

  • 5 AI fears and how to address them

    Most people don’t know what microservices architecture is, for example, even if some of the apps they use every day were built in decoupled fashion. But technical evolutions like microservices don’t tend to cause the kinds of emotional responses that AI does around potential social and economic impacts. Nor have microservices haven’t been immortalized in popular culture: No one is lining up at the box office for "Terminator: Rise of the Cloud-Native Apps."

    This speaks mainly to fears about AI’s nebulous future, and it can be tough to evaluate their validity when our imaginations run wild. That’s not particularly useful for IT leaders and other execs trying to build a practical AI strategy today. Yet you will encounter fears – many of them well-founded. The trick is to focus on these real-world concerns, not the time-traveling robot assassins. For starters, they’re much easier to defeat – er, address – because they’re often based in current reality, not futuristic speculation.

    “The types of fears [people have about AI] depend on the type of AI that we are talking about,” says Keiland Cooper, a neuroscience research associate at the University of California Irvine and co-director of ContinualAI. “The more theoretical and far off ‘general AI’ – a computer that can do all the things that humans can do – will raise more fears than those from a more realistic AI algorithm like we see being commonly used today.”

    Let’s look at five legitimate concerns about AI today – and expert advice for addressing them so that they don’t derail your AI plans.

  • CentOS 8 "Gnome Desktop" overview | The community enterprise operating system

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of CentOS 8.0.1905 "Gnome" and some of the applications pre-installed. 

  • How deep does the vDPA rabbit hole go?

    In this post we will be leading you through the different building blocks used for implementing the virtio full HW offloading and the vDPA solutions. This effort is still in progress, thus some bits may change in the future, however the governing building blocks are expected to stay the same. 

    We will be discussing the VFIO, vfio-pci and vhost-vfio all intended on accessing drivers from the userspace both in the guest and the host. We will also be discussing MDEV, vfio-mdev, vhost-mdev and virtio-mdev transport API constructing the vDPA solutions. 

    The post is a technical deep dive and is intended for architects, developers and those who are passionate about understanding how all the pieces fall into place. If you are more interested in understanding the big picture of vDPA, the previous post "Achieving network wirespeed in an open standard manner - introducing vDPA" is strongly recommended instead (we did warn you). 

  • CNCF’s Envoy report card shows Google, Lyft are top of contributing class

    The CNCF has delivered a report card on Envoy, the open source edge and service proxy which is usually mentioned alongside the words Kubernetes or service mesh.

    The report comes a year after Envoy graduated from the CNCF incubation process, and the headline scores are 1,700 contributors, who have made 10,300 code commits, 5,700 pull requests and 51,000 contributions overall.

    Envoy was initially developed in 2016 at Lyft, the ridesharing giant which isn’t Uber, and this is reflected in the CNCF report. Lyft still accounts for 30.4 of the Envoy code, though Google is the biggest contributor overall, with 42.8 per cent of the code.

  • Highly Automated and Secured Multi-Tenancy Using SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    I notice that when it comes to using a XaaS solution, clients and solution architects are typically concerned about multi-tenancy. This post attempts to decipher why that is and how SUSE CaaS Platform helps make this a reality.

Databases: Databases in Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) and Using PostgreSQL as a Cache

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  • Better guidance for database developers

    At the inaugural Databases microconference at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), two developers who work on rather different database systems had similar complaints about developing for Linux. Richard Hipp, creator of the SQLite database, and Andres Freund from the PostgreSQL project both lamented the lack of definitive documentation on how to best use the kernel's I/O interfaces, especially for corner cases. Both of the sessions, along with others in the microconference, pointed to a strong need for more interaction between user-space and kernel developers.

  • Using PostgreSQL as a cache?

    In the article on his blog Peter asks "How much faster is Redis at storing a blob of JSON compared to PostgreSQL?". Answer: 14x slower.

    Seems about right. Usually Redis is about 4x faster for a simple query like that compared to using PostgreSQL as a cache in my experience. It's why so many people use Redis as a cache. But I'd suggest PostgreSQL is good enough to act as a cache for many people.

    Django is pretty slow at fetching from PostgreSQL compared to other python options, so this could explain part of the 14x VS 4x difference.

    [...]

    Of course you should probably just cache the views at the CDN/web proxy level, or even at the Django view or template level. So you probably won't even hit the Django app most times.

No Matter What You’ve Heard, the Docker Container Ship Is Not Sinking

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According to some press reports around a leaked memo from Docker's CEO to its employees, the open source company that all but invented the container technology boosting cloud growth for the last five years or so is facing hard times. Although the memo does indicate that the company is needing some cash to tide it over or help it expand, the situation doesn't seem to indicate that the Docker container can't weather the storm.

"As shared at the last all hands (meeting), we have been engaging with investors to secure more financing to continue to execute on our strategy," Rob Bearden, Docker's CEO since May, wrote in an email sent to company employees. "I wanted to share a quick update on where we stand. We are currently in active negotiations with two investors and are working through final terms. We should be able to provide you a more complete update within the next couple of weeks."

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Top 20 Best Linux Mail Server Software and Solutions in 2019

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Software

The E-mail has proved to be the fastest and reliable communication medium of our time. From businesses to individuals, we all rely on e-mails due to the convenience they offer. If you ever wondered how computers send these seemingly simple messages over the network, then follow us through this guide. At the heart of e-mail communication, there are mainly two software components, namely the mail server and mail client. The mail server is responsible for transmitting e-mails from node to node on a network, typically the Internet. And the client allows users in retrieving these mails. In this guide, we’ll solely focus on Linux mail server. Check out our another guide to learn more about various Linux mail clients.

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Review: FreedomBox 2019-07-10 "Buster"

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FreedomBox is the most recent distribution to be added to the DistroWatch database. What is FreedomBox? According to the project's website:
FreedomBox is designed to be your own inexpensive server at home. It runs free software and offers an increasing number of services ranging from a calendar or Jabber server to a wiki or VPN. Our web interface allows you to easily install and configure your apps.
On the technical side, FreedomBox is based on Debian. The latest version is based on Debian 10 "Buster". Unlike some Debian projects, FreedomBox is a "pure blend" which means all the packages it uses, or develops, can be found in the Debian repositories. This keeps FreedomBox close to upstream and completely compatible with Debian.

FreedomBox can be purchased bundled with hardware running an ARM CPU or downloaded as a compressed disk image to be installed on existing hardware. The distribution has disk images that run on 32-bit (x86), 64-bit (x86_64) and several flavours of ARM-powered boards. These flavours are available in Stable, Testing and Daily branches, depending if we want a fixed or rolling release operating system. I decided to try the Stable version for 64-bit machines.

The 64-bit image file is a 386MB download which unpacks to 3.8GB when uncompressed. This image file can be written to an SD card or USB thumb drive. By default, FreedomBox runs from the thumb drive or SD card rather than having a typical install process where packages are written to a hard drive. People who wish to perform a customized hard drive install can install Debian first and then add the FreedomBox software on top with a few commands.

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Peter Bengtsson: How much faster is Redis at storing a blob of JSON compared to PostgreSQL?

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OSS

First of all, I'm still a PostgreSQL fan-boy and have no intention of ceasing that. These times are made up of much more than just the individual databases. For example, the PostgreSQL speeds depend on the Django ORM code that makes the SQL and sends the query and then turns it into the model instance. I don't know what the proportions are between that and the actual bytes-from-PG's-disk times. But I'm not sure I care either. The tooling around the database is inevitable mostly and it's what matters to users.

Both Redis and PostgreSQL are persistent and survive server restarts and crashes etc. And you get so many more "batch related" features with PostgreSQL if you need them, such as being able to get a list of the last 10 rows added for some post-processing batch job.

I'm currently using Django's cache framework, with Redis as its backend, and it's a cache framework. It's not meant to be a persistent database. I like the idea that if I really have to I can just flush the cache and although detrimental to performance (temporarily) it shouldn't be a disaster. So I think what I'll do is store these JSON blobs in both databases. Yes, it means roughly 6GB of SSD storage but it also potentially means loading a LOT more into RAM on my limited server. That extra RAM usage pretty much sums of this whole blog post; of course it's faster if you can rely on RAM instead of disk. Now I just need to figure out how RAM I can afford myself for this piece and whether it's worth it.

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Server: Proxmox, KubeVirt and Containers

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  • VMware vSphere vs Proxmox: Which is best for your business?

    Choosing a virtualisation tool can be tricky, so we've put two of the most popular side by side
    Customers are faced with a host of considerations when it comes to trying to decide on what virtualisation and containerisation software to use, and the differences between vendors are not always clear.

    In order to better inform buyers, we've decided to take a look at two of the best-known software packages out there, Proxmox and VMware vSphere, and break down what it is they do and how they may benefit your business.

  • KubeVirt Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    This month the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) formally adopted KubeVirt into the CNCF Sandbox. KubeVirt allows you to provision, manage and run virtual machines from and within Kubernetes. In joining the CNCF Sandbox, KubeVirt now has a more substantial platform to grow as well as educate the CNCF community on the use cases for placing virtual machines within Kubernetes. The CNCF onboards projects into the CNCF Sandbox when they warrant experimentation on neutral ground to promote and foster collaborative development.

    For our part, Red Hat has been a contributor and advocate for KubeVirt and we’ve been leveraging it to play with some technologies you may remember. At Red Hat Summit you watched us demonstrate the capabilities of a Kubernetes Native platform bringing together the capabilities of VMs, containers, networking and storage. If you’re an OpenShift customer you may have started to play with Container-native virtualization (CNV), available via tech preview — this uses KubeVirt under the hood.

  • Software Development, Microservices & Container Management – Part II – Why Containers and Cloud Native Application Platform?

    Lots of the developers, Solution Architects and Business Owners have doubts for Virtualization versus Containers and Cloud Native Application Platform; lots of questions are being discussed based on such doubts; Are containers and PaaS replacing Virtual Machines? What are the benefits Containers and Cloud Native Application Platform over a VM offering?

Server: Openwashing, Containous and Red Hat

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  • Are ground systems about to have an open source moment?

    Bogdan compared the open architecture configuration to an iPhone. While the iPhone software is designed by Apple, it’s built so that non-Apple companies can build hundreds of apps that users can pick and choose from to install onto the platform. Similarly, DoD’s ground systems need to be built with a common framework that multiple vendors can design applications for.

  • Containous releases Traefik 2.0 open source edge router

    With the movement toward cloud-native application deployment, there has been a corresponding need for cloud-native networking technology. One of the most successful efforts in the space comes from startup Containous, with its open source Traefik edge router technology.

    Traefik 2.0 became generally available on Sept. 17, providing users with new TCP routing support and an improved API to help direct traffic in cloud-native deployments, including the Kubernetes container orchestration platform. The new Traefik release builds on the experience the company has gained through its large user base. According to Containous, it has had over 1 billion downloads of Traefik from the Docker Hub repository for container applications.

  • Boosting banks’ customer experience with operational efficiency

    The way banking is being conducted around the world is changing, especially with customers who are always connected through mobile phones and with 5G not far away in many places.

    Coupling that with the rising levels of wage growth entrepreneurship and government policies for financial inclusion, banking's traditional customer journeys and distribution models won’t scale nor reach the average consumer, and will be significantly cost-prohibitive for the average bank to service. The idea that a consumer needs to visit a branch doesn’t even come into their equation.

    Moreover, the consumption of banking products from FinTechs, including unsecured lending, peer-to-peer payments, merchant payments, and business credit, is on the rise. Providers like Ascend Money and Rakuten are fast, simple and digital-first. Simply put, they engender customer satisfaction.  

UCS 4.4-2: Second Point Release

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Looking back at the first point release (UCS 4.4-1 in June 2019), our REST API for the Univention Directory Manager was still in beta stadium. Good news: the interface for accessing the directory service is stable now. The API connects applications to the UCS directory service; access is granted via a web service using HTTPS, and data is exchanged JSON format. So, the REST API offers the same functionality as the udm command line tool.
For example, it simplifies the maintenance of user properties or computer objects from connected systems. Developers of applications offered in the Univention App Center also benefit from the new, standardized access because they are no longer limited to the UDM Python interface. The REST API of the Univention Directory Manager is by default activated on all UCS 4.4-2 DC Master and DC Backup instances.

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