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Side By Side Comparison Between GAFAM And Alternative World

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Web

This is a list of good alternatives to GAFAM online services in ways understandable by people without deep knowledge about computer. By "Gafam" I mean popular online services of Google, Facebook, and alike and by "Alternative World" I mean Free Software-based challenging services of SearX, Mastodon, PeerTube, and alike. You can find here the new term Fediverse is sided with Alternative World. I hope this short article helps everybody to try out our Alternative World. Enjoy!

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Docker builds open source community around Compose Specification

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OSS
  • Docker builds open source community around Compose Specification

    “Opening the specification will allow innovation to flourish and deliver more choices to developers, accelerating how development teams build and ship applications,” Docker wrote in a blog post. “Open governance will benefit the wider community of new and existing users with transparency and the ability to have input into the future direction of the specification and Compose based tools.”

    Previously Compose did not have a published specification, and was tied to the implementation, and to specifics of the platforms it shipped on.

    Now, Compose simplifies the code to cloud process and toolchain for developers by allowing them to define a complex stack in a single file and run it with a single command. This eliminates the need to build and start every container manually, the company explained. Docker intends to submit the specification to an open source foundation “to enhance the playing field and openness.”

  • Docker open sources Compose Spec, aims for added Kubernetes flavour

    Docker has handed its Compose Spec to the open source world and is looking for maintainers for the project to help it expand its Kubernetes footprint.

  • Docker's Compose specification is now an open standard

    Docker Compose, the system created by Docker to define multi-container applications, is now to be developed as an open standard.

    The Compose Specification, as the new standard is called, is meant to allow Compose-created apps to work on other multi-container definition systems on platforms such as Kubernetes and Amazon Elastic Container Service.

Server: OpenSMTPD and Dovecot, Containers and Kubernetes

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  • Setting up an email server in 2020 with OpenSMTPD and Dovecot

    So, you want to set up your own email server? In that case, welcome.

    There are many reasons to run a custom email server, ranging from privacy concerns about providers like Google, to just wanting to do it for fun and/or learning. Since you're here, I assume you've already found a reason.

    Beware: this is a messy topic, and the available documentation is even messier, so it could take a while before you get it to work properly. I've compiled this guide according to my experiences in an attempt to make this dark art more accessible, but your mileage may vary considerably. I hope you find it useful.

  • Docker's Compose specification is now an open standard

    Docker Compose, the system created by Docker to define multi-container applications, is now to be developed as an open standard.

    The Compose Specification, as the new standard is called, is meant to allow Compose-created apps to work on other multi-container definition systems on platforms such as Kubernetes and Amazon Elastic Container Service.

  • How Kubernetes saved my desktop application

    Recently, fellow Opensource.com scribe James Farrell wrote a wonderful article entitled How Ansible brought peace to my home. In addition to the great article, I really liked the title, one of those unexpected phrases that I’m sure brought a smile to many faces.

    I recently had a weird but positive experience of my own that begs a similar sort of unexpected label. I’ve been grappling with a difficult problem that arose when upgrading some server and networking infrastructure that broke a Java application I’ve been supporting since the early 2000s. Strangely enough, I found the solution in what appears to be a very informative and excellent article on Kubernetes, of all things.

Cloud Foundry sees top leadership change

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OSS

For over a decade, Abby Kearns has been the face of the popular open-source, Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, Cloud Foundry. First as the project manager for Pivotal Cloud Foundry and then as the Cloud Foundry Foundation's executive director. Now, Kearns' moving on to another executive position, and CTO Chip Childers has assumed her role as executive director.

Childers brings vast experience with Cloud Foundry to the head chair. With five-years under his belt at Cloud Foundry as CTO, he and Kearns have both been Cloud Foundry's public faces. Before he came to Cloud Foundry, he had served as vice-president of Apache Cloudstack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). In short, Childers knows cloud technology like the back of his hand.

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Remote support options for sysadmins

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As a sysadmin, you do support—support for local users as level I, II, III, or all of the above. You might have even supported remote users. Maybe your office environment was once 100 percent local and you had no remote support duties. But now, your job might be completely supporting remote users and systems. Great news, huh? Well, there's hope. Using some great remote support tools, you can still do your job just as efficiently from a distance as you could with walk-up access. Sure, it's a little more difficult, but once you establish your support tools and workflow, you might never return to a traditional office. This article highlights support tools for a new age of remote support.

Remote support is difficult. To get an idea of just how difficult it is, I've only known one person in more than twenty years of working as a sysadmin who actually enjoyed supporting remote users. It was great for the rest of the team because we could just reassign tickets to him and away he'd go on them. For the rest of us, we felt like we were trying to wash dishes from across the room without really seeing the dishes. These remote support options will help you support your users without the frustration of a click-by-click follow-along session. You'll be able to see everything that's going on or actually perform the work yourself.

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Server: CentOS, MitM, Ceph, Kubernetes and Linux Bashing

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  • Learn CentOS Part 11 - Installing and removing Packages

    In the "Learn CentOS" series, you'll learn all the skills you'll need to know to manage real servers and get you on your way to mastering the art of Linux administration.

  • How to avoid man-in-the-middle cyber attacks

    Remember, you don't have to click anything online right away, and you don't have to follow random people's instructions, no matter how urgent they may seem. The internet will still be there after you step away from the computer and verify the identity of a person or site demanding your attention.

    While MITM attacks can happen to anyone, understanding what they are, knowing how they happen, and actively taking steps to prevent them can safeguard you from being a victim.

  • Another perspective on Swift versus Ceph today

    Mark's perspective is largely founded in the fault tolerance and administrative overhead. However, let's a look at "keep using [Ceph] for object too".

    Indeed the integration of block, POSIX, and object storage is Ceph's strength, although I should note for the record that Ceph has a large gap: all 3 APIs live in separate namespaces. So, do not expect to be able to copy a disk snapshot through CephFS or RGW. Objects in each namespace are completely invisible to two others, and the only uniform access layer is RADOS. This is why, for instance, RGW-over-NFS exists. That's right, not CephFS, but NFS. You can mount RGW.

    All attempts at this sort of integration that I know in Swift always start with a uniform access first. It the opposite of Ceph in a way. Because of that, these integrations typically access from the edge inside, like making a pool that a daemon fills/spills with Swift, and mounting that. SwiftStacks's ProxyFS is a little more native to Swift, but it starts off with a shared namespace too.

  • API Priority and Fairness Alpha

    This blog describes “API Priority And Fairness”, a new alpha feature in Kubernetes 1.18. API Priority And Fairness permits cluster administrators to divide the concurrency of the control plane into different weighted priority levels. Every request arriving at a kube-apiserver will be categorized into one of the priority levels and get its fair share of the control plane’s throughput.

  • BlackBerry: Chinese cybercriminals target high-value Linux servers with weak defenses [Ed: To CBS, servers that are improperly maintained or set up are "Linux"; if it's something Windows, they won't even specify the platform and won't blame Microsoft.]

Server: Rosetta@Home, MariaDB SkySQL, and Kubernetes

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  • Rosetta@Home Now Supports 64-bit Arm SBC’s and Servers in the Fight against COVID-19

    As explained in an article on miniNodes, you’ll need a board with at least 2GB RAM and running a 64-bit operating system. That means Raspbian will not work since it’s only 32-bit, and instead you can use Ubuntu 18.04 / 19.04 server 64-bit for Raspberry Pi. On other SBC’s, people have been using Armbian successfully.

  • MariaDB SkySQL enables cloud-native database as a service

    Howard: It's more than just X4, it's a very interesting amalgamation of power. Yes, it does have X4, whose primary distinction in the marketplace is to have analytic and transactional processing all in the same database. X4 is also more than that, with the way in which data is propagated from the row store to the columnar store in an approach we call smart transactions.

    Typically what has to happen is that data has to be propagated to a separate data warehousing instance, like a Redshift or Snowflake. Here it's part and parcel of the same database. So that's unique, and that's manifested in SkySQL. That's no easy task to do and we automate things like block storage as well.

    On top of that is Kubernetes. We spent a lot of time optimizing the Kubernetes footprint to really handle a persistent technology like a database.

    [...]

    Howard: We tried many different techniques. We started off with a physical instantiation. But it was about two years ago when we saw the opportunity with Kubernetes.

    Because of MariaDB's community and global footprint it was clear to me that we would have to be multi-cloud. Doing that physically and having a portal on each of the clouds was just an unnecessary evil. So after starting with using virtual machines and physical instantiation methods, we moved to the Kubernetes method.

  • Is Kubernetes becoming the driving force of enterprise IT?

    Now and again, enterprise technology comes along that seems like a beautifully simple solution to a complicated problem. Take Kubernetes—the open source platform that automates Linux container operations, eliminating many of the manual processes involved in deploying and scaling containerised applications. It is exciting to see how Kubernetes is evolving to meet the challenge of running mission critical workloads at scale.

    Container use will only continue to increase. A recent Red Hat survey found that 62% of organisations have minimal (less than 10%) container use today, but only 20% say that will still be the case in two years’ time. Meanwhile, the percentage with more than half their workloads containerised is expected to almost triple—to 28%—over the same period.

Linux Foundation and HPE in Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative

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OSS
  • HPE's open source program simplifies end-to-end automation and accelerates technology evolution

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative, a new open source program that will simplify the management of large-scale geographically distributed physical infrastructure deployments.

    In addition, HPE will introduce an enterprise offering, the HPE Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Resource Aggregator that is aligned with the initiative.

  • HPE unveils open source software to reduce 5G complexity

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) has unveiled the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative, an open source programme designed to simplify the management and roll-out of large-scale geographically distributed physical 5G infrastructure deployments.

    HPE sees 5G as representing a huge shift in the way mobile networks are built and, unlike previous generation networks that were largely built on proprietary systems, using standards designed to use open software platforms operating on commercial off-the-shelf servers.

  • HPE turns up 5G heat with open source management project

    Just weeks after HPE made its biggest play yet for the 5G market with the launch of a hosted 5G core (see Wireless Watch March 16 2020), it has announced an open source project with Intel and the Linux Foundation, also focused on the core. While its previous announcement brought the as-a-service model, so familiar in the enterprise, to operators, this new cooperation imports another enterprise norm that is slowly taking hold in the telco world, the open source platform. Both these changes help to bring the economics of the IT and cloud markets to telecoms, and in doing so, provide an opportunity for new 5G entrants like HPE to try to unseat the incumbent vendors along with their proprietary…

  • HPE to launch open source software for 5G core

    HPE is partnering with Intel and the Linux Foundation as it continues its push to sell 5G core network equipment. HPE and Intel plan to build an open source project under the Linux Foundation to help operators automate network management as they roll out next-generation networks across sites that use hardware from multiple vendors. HPE calls its new partnership the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Initiative.

    In addition to Intel, HPE is partnering with several other companies for this initiative, including IBM's open source software unit Red Hat and IT services giant Tech Mahindra, as well as AMI (an input/output system firmware vendor), Apstra (a data center network automation specialist) and World Wide Technology (a provider of automation and orchestration solutions for carriers and enterprises).

  • HPE allies with Intel to ease open source 5G rollouts

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) sought to speed adoption of open source 5G infrastructure, teaming with Intel on a new software initiative which aims to solve complexity issues associated with using multiple network vendors.

    In a statement, HPE said its Open Distributed Infrastructure Management (ODIM) initiative will provide “infrastructure manageability code” to the open source community, to enable vendor-neutral configuration and management of compute, storage and other infrastructure.

  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise Aims To Deliver 5G Simplification

    This week Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced a set of initiatives aimed at simplifying operator deployments of 5G, including a new platform initiative, enhanced standards and tools, and open source collaboration. I recently spent time with executives from the company’s telecommunications division. I would like to share my insights into what I found to be the most significant portions of the announcements.

Server: Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager 4.3, SUSE® Manager 4, Microsoft Azure Failing as Usual

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  • Announcing Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager 4.3

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager, release 4.3. This server virtualization management platform can be easily deployed to configure, monitor, and manage an Oracle Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) environment with enterprise-grade performance and support from Oracle. This release is based on the 4.3.6 release of the open source oVirt project.

  • Containers and SUSE® Manager 4

    Linux container technology dials up efficiency and keeps costs to a minimum, but only if you have the tools you need to keep control of audits, updates, configuration and other lifecycle tasks. And with the ever-changing technology landscape, it has become critical that such management technology can work with containers. Fortunately, SUSE® Manager 4 includes such a solution, with tools for easily managing your container-based Linux resources.

  • 'Azure appears to be full': UK punters complain of capacity issues on Microsoft's cloud

    Customers of Microsoft's Azure cloud are reporting capacity issues such as the inability to create resources and associated reliability issues.

    [...]

    Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD), a handy solution for remote workers, is one example. One user complained on Twitter that "Azure seems to be full" when trying to allocate a VM for WVD, though it appears to be a test deployment (if the name WVD-TEST-0 is anything to go by). The error reads "Allocation failed. We do not have sufficient capacity for the requested VM size in this region." The region is UK South.

  • Introducing Windows CSI support alpha for Kubernetes

    The alpha version of CSI Proxy for Windows is being released with Kubernetes 1.18. CSI proxy enables CSI Drivers on Windows by allowing containers in Windows to perform privileged storage operations.

Rant of the day: well, at least Microsoft is making loads of money...

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Microsoft

Sadly, many if not most of our schools today are suddenly pumping lots of extra money into Microsoft, Zoom and other proprietary software companies, because they need online collaboration. We all know there are many alternatives to giving their students' data away to foreign companies but most don't bother. It is annoying, there is always budget for Microsoft, but not for proper, local, privacy-protecting open source solutions, even if those are better. Why is that?

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More in Tux Machines

Septor 2020.5

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2) System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020 Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1 Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2 Update Tor to 0.4.4.5 Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20 Read more

Incremental backup with Butterfly Backup

This article explains how to make incremental or differential backups, with a catalog available to restore (or export) at the point you want, with Butterfly Backup. Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive. Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop". [...] We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and AMD

  • NVIDIA Ships Vulkan Driver Beta With Fragment Shading Rate Control - Phoronix

    This week's Vulkan 1.2.158 spec release brought the fragment shading rate extension to control the rate at which fragments are shaded on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. This can be useful similar to OpenGL and Direct3D support for helping to allow different, less important areas of the screen be shaded less than areas requiring greater detail/focus. NVIDIA on Tuesday released the 455.26.02 Linux driver (and 457.00 version for Windows) that adds this fragment shading rate extension.

  • Intel Begins Adding Alder Lake Graphics Support To Their Linux Driver - Phoronix

    Intel has begun adding support for Alderlake-S to their open-source Linux kernel graphics driver. An initial set of 18 patches amounting to just around 300 lines of new kernel code was sent out today for beginning the hardware enablement work on Alderlake-S from the graphics side. Yes, it's only a few hundred lines of new driver code due to Alder Lake leveraging the existing Gen12/Tigerlake support. The Alder Lake driver patches similarly re-use some of the same workarounds and changes as set for the 14nm Rocket Lake processors with Gen12 graphics coming out in Q1.

  • AMD Linux Driver Preparing For A Navi "Blockchain" Graphics Card - Phoronix

    While all eyes are on the AMD Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" graphics cards set to be announced next week, it also looks like AMD is preparing for a Navi 1x "Blockchain" graphics card offering given the latest work in their open-source Linux driver. Patches posted today provide support for a new Navi graphics card referred to as the "navi10 blockchain SKU." The Navi 10 part has a device ID of 0x731E. From the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver perspective, the only difference from the existing Navi 10 GPU support is these patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support with this new SKU not having any display support.