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Server

Servers: Ubuntu, Kube and More

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Server
  • Telco cloud: what is that? | Ubuntu

    Telco cloud or a network function virtualisation infrastructure (NFVI) is a cloud environment optimised for telco workloads. It is usually based on well-known technologies like OpenStack. Thus, in many ways, it resembles ordinary clouds. On the other hand, however, it differs from them. This is because telco workloads have very specific requirements. Those include performance acceleration, high level of security and orchestration capabilities. In order to better understand where those demands are coming from, let’s start with reviewing what kind of workloads are telcos running in the cloud.

  • OpenStack at 10 – from peak to plateau of productivity | Ubuntu

    This week is the latest Open Infrastructure Summit, in a week where the OpenStack Foundation became the Open Infrastructure Foundation to reflect the expansion of the organisation’s mission, scope and community to advance open source over the next decade to support open infrastructure. It is also ten years since OpenStack launched and a lot has changed during that time.

    We asked freelance journalist, Sean Michael Kerner, to share his views on the last ten years. Sean is a freelance journalist writing on myriad IT topics for publications around the world. He has spoken at more OpenStack events than he cares to remember. English is his second language (Klingon his first). Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

    10 years ago in July 2010, I got an unusual pitch from a PR person. It was the beginning of a long and winding road that defines my experience and viewpoint on OpenStack.

    Unlike the usual spate of product and open source pitches from vendors that I got at the time (and still get), the pitch I got on the sunny July afternoon was an offer to speak with the CTO of IT at NASA. It was an offer I couldn’t refuse – and I suspect it’s also the reason why OpenStack got so much attention early on – it was literally ‘rocket science’. In a 2012 video interview I did with Chris Kemp after he left the role of CTO at NASA to start his own OpenStack startup, he told me that in his view OpenStack could well become one of NASA’s great contributions to society.

  • Canonical & Ubuntu at KubeCon NA Virtual 2020 | Ubuntu

    By now it’s no surprise that KubeCon NA is going virtual, like the majority of events worldwide. Is that bad news? Quite the opposite! According to CNCF, this year’s KubeCon EU – the first KubeCon to ever be hosted virtually – made it possible for over 18,700 Kubeheads to sign up, 72% of which were first-time KubeCon + CloudNativeCon attendees. In other words, as we have all believed for so many years now, tech is helping the community grow and get closer.

  • Production-Ready Notebooks for End-to-End ML Workflows With Kubeflow

    Machine Learning projects consist of several distinct steps: first, data validation verifies the state of the collected data. Processing prepares the features so an algorithm can consume them. Model training makes learning feasible, and model validation guarantees generalization. Fine-tuning adjusts the hyper-parameters to obtain the optimum results. Finally, after numerous iterations, the last step deploys a model to staging or production.

    Each of these steps can be a separate process, running at its own cadence, with well-defined inputs and outputs. Thus, data scientists and ML engineers tend to think of these projects like pipelines. If there is something wrong with incoming information, the process could fail or even worse corrupt downstream analytic tasks. Thus, standardizing the process of creating these interconnected actions can make the pipeline more robust.

    In this article, we demonstrate how to turn Jupyter Notebooks into Kubeflow Pipelines and Katib Experiments automatically. Such a system eliminates the erroneous process of manually extracting the bits that make sense in a Notebook, containerize them and launching a Pipeline using explicit Domain-Specific Languages.

  • Support for Istio 1.6 ends on November 21st, 2020

    According to Istio’s support policy, LTS releases like 1.6 are supported for three months after the next LTS release. Since 1.7 was released on August 21st, support for 1.6 will end on November 21st, 2020.

    At that point we will stop back-porting fixes for security issues and critical bugs to 1.6, so we encourage you to upgrade to the latest version of Istio (1.7.3). If you don’t do this you may put yourself in the position of having to do a major upgrade on a short timeframe to pick up a critical fix.

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Announces Project Updates

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation (CFF) has announced the release of version 1.0 of cf-for-k8s, the release of version 2.5 of KubeCF, and the release of version 4.2 of Stratos.

Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’

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Server
OSS
  • Over 60 Global Organizations Join in Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’ to Build the Next Decade of Infrastructure for AI, 5G, Edge
  • OpenStack Foundation Becomes Open Infrastructure Foundation

    The OpenStack Foundation is changing its name to the Open Infrastructure Foundation (OIF), a move that mirrors the rebranding of the project’s OpenStack Summit to Open Infrastructure Summit. The changes, according to the press release, reflect “an expansion of the organization’s mission, scope and community to advance open source over the next decade to support open infrastructure.”

    As Frederic Lardinois reports for TechCrunch, the OpenStack project itself, “which helps enterprises run their private cloud, found its niche in the telecom space, though, and continues to thrive as one of the world’s most active open source projects.” Last week, OpenStack released a new major version (called Victoria), which includes more than 20,000 code changes.

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Ghanshyam Mann at NEC

    Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

    [...]

    What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack?

    I have my team working in different open source communities and discuss daily on how each community works and solves the issue. Based on that, I found the OpenStack community is more open and transparent (our four opens strength). We might not be perfect but we are definitely one of the best open source communities.

    There is no specific advice as such, but I will suggest keep doing the same and never compromise on defined four opens principles.

Graylog Monitoring Server on Ubuntu Linux for Monitoring Server/Services

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Server
Software
Ubuntu

Graylog is not a system monitoring tool; it’s a system monitoring server. I am sure; previously, you have been using tools to monitor your Linux system. The concept of Graylog is mind-blowing; it’s enormous. Have you thought before that you can install an entire server to monitor your system or services? Graylog offers you to monitor your small, medium, and big all types of systems and services. As you are going through this post, you will learn a lot about the Graylog monitoring server. Graylog will provide you every single detail that you might have wanted to know about your system. Installing and configuring the Graylog monitoring server is not much complex on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

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6 MongoDB GUIs that Shine

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Server
Software

MongoDB is a high performance, open source, non-relational NoSQL database written in C++. Here's the best MongoDB GUIs.

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Top five Vim plugins for sysadmins

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Development
Server
Software

Last year I wrote the article 5 useful Vim plugins for developers for Opensource.com. This article follows a similar idea but focuses on plugins that make sysadmins more productive, regardless of what scripting, programming language, or frameworks they use. There's another class of Vim plugins focused on code completion and syntax checking that are intentionally not covered in this article. They will be the topic for another post.

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Canonical Introducing HA MicroK8s

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Server
Ubuntu

     

  • Introducing HA MicroK8s, the ultra-reliable, minimal Kubernetes | Ubuntu

    Canonical today announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes. Already popular for IoT and developer workstations, MicroK8s now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments.

    High availability is enabled automatically once three or more nodes are clustered, and the data store migrates automatically between nodes to maintain quorum in the event of a failure. “The autonomous HA MicroK8s delivers a zero-ops experience that is perfect for distributed micro clouds and busy administrators”, says Alex Chalkias, Product Manager at Canonical.

    Designed as a minimal conformant Kubernetes, MicroK8s installs and clusters with a single command.

  • Canonical introduces high-availability Micro-Kubernetes | ZDNet

    If you've been hiding under a rock -- and who could blame you these days? -- you may have missed how totally Kubernetes now dominates container orchestration. One way to quickly get up to speed on Kubernetes is with Canonical's  MicroK8s. This is an easy-to-run and install mini-version of Kubernetes. And now Canonical has added autonomous high availability (HA) clustering to it. 

    Seriously.

  • Canonical Announces HA MicroK8s

    MicroK8s, already popular for IoT and developer workstations, now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments. Canonical has announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes.

GNU/Linux in HPC/Servers: Quobyte and CBeST

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GNU
Linux
Server

     

  • It Takes Geological Patience To Change Datacenter Storage

    Moving from an HPC center or a hyperscaler to work on enterprise software has to be a frustrating experience. In the HPC and hyperscaler world, when you need to deal with a problem, it is usually one of scale or performance – or both – and you have to solve the problem now. Like in a year or less, but sometimes you get more time to refine things. Call it 18 months, tops. The new platform – database, storage, network control, compute control, whatever it is – goes into production and months later replaces whatever was going to run out of gas just in time to save the company.

    The enterprise, into which we lump government and academic institutions, by contrast, move at a much slower pace because the risk profile is much higher. If your email or social network or media archive is down for minutes, hours, or even days, no one is going to die. But if an enterprise has an outage and either customer data is compromised or normal business is interrupted, reputation and money are on the line.

    [...]

    The first Quobyte release came in late 2014, a little more than a year after the company’s founding – see how fast these hyperscalers move? – and it was designed from the ground up to be a POSIX-compliant object storage system with file and block overlays when necessary, with triple redundancy of data running on absolutely plain vanilla X86 Linux servers.

  • PSSC Labs Announces CBeST Cluster Management Software Stack v5 Release with Red Hat Support - insideHPC

    Lake Forest, CA , Oct. 13, 2020 — PSSC Labs, a developer of high performance computing (HPC) and big data computing solutions, announces today that a new release of CBeST Cluster Management v 5.0 Software Stack will be available. The newest version of CBeST will add support for the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux / CentOS Linux 8.0 operating system and provide enhanced support for advanced technologies from Intel, AMD and NVIDIA. CBeST will support bursting to cloud environments including Microsoft Azure, Amazon AWS and Google Compute.

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  • PSSC Labs Announces New CBeST Cluster Management Software Stack v5 Release

    The newest version of CBeST will add support for the latest Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® / CentOS Linux® 8.0 operating system and provide enhanced support for advanced technologies from Intel®, AMD® and NVIDIA®.

Server: Knative, eBPF, and Kubernetes Steering Committee Election Results

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Server
Google

     

  • Google Set to Unleash Knative - SDxCentral

    Google is set to give up most control over the Knative Project by electing a steering committee to oversee the direction of the Kubernetes-based serverless project. The decision comes on the heels of Google taking a more controversial approach with the Istio service mesh project.

    Protocol first reported on Google’s plans for the Knative Project late last week.

    In a blog post, Paul Morie, writing on behalf of the Knative Steering Committee, explained that it had recently constructed a new steering committee charter that will include an upcoming election for five steering committee members. The plan calls for the five members to serve as individuals and not representing their employer. The plan also states that no vendor will be allowed to have a majority of seats on the steering committee.

    The project will also set up a new Knative Trademark Committee to deal with trademark issues. That committee will initially include members from Google, IBM/Red Hat, and VMware.

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  • Using eBPF Monitoring to Know What to Measure and Why - Container Journal

    eBPF enables users to trace application activity down to a very low level for better performance analysis

    Let’s say you’re a doctor. You know that the human body is tremendously complex, with multiple systems operating and interacting simultaneously. You also understand that sometimes things can go wrong and a person gets sick. Or there might be symptoms that history suggests are potential signs of trouble. How do you determine what is going on? What metrics can you collect that will reveal medically valuable information? And what tools are available to do that?

    The same issue that has challenged physicians for centuries is one that IT professionals now face: When you’re troubleshooting a complex system, what diagnostics do you measure, how do you measure them and what do you do with your findings?

    [...]

    eBPF programs run inside the kernel; they are attached to a code path and whenever that code path is traversed, the program executes. This decoupling of the kernel and eBPF program increases the development time as the developer doesn’t have to recompile the kernel each time the eBPF program is changed. eBPF is useful for both packet processing as well as performance analysis and monitoring, as eBPF programs can be attached to tracepoints, kprobes and even perf events. As you may have already guessed, attaching user-space programs inside the kernel can cause serious security and stability issues; thus, a series of tests are performed on each eBPF program before it’s loaded.

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  • Kubernetes Blog: Announcing the 2020 Steering Committee Election Results

    The 2020 Steering Committee Election is now complete. In 2019, the committee arrived at its final allocation of 7 seats, 3 of which were up for election in 2020. Incoming committee members serve a term of 2 years, and all members are elected by the Kubernetes Community.

    This community body is significant since it oversees the governance of the entire Kubernetes project. With that great power comes great responsibility. You can learn more about the steering committee’s role in their charter.

MariaDB 10.5.6 Release Notes

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Server
OSS

MariaDB 10.5 is the current stable series of MariaDB. It is an evolution of MariaDB 10.4 with several entirely new features not found anywhere else and with backported and reimplemented features from MySQL.

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Announcing the release of Oracle Linux 7 Update 9

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Server

Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 Update 9, which includes Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 6 as the default kernel. Oracle Linux brings the latest open source innovations and business-critical performance and security optimizations for cloud and on-premises deployment. Oracle Linux maintains user space compatibility with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), which is independent of the kernel version that underlies the operating system. Existing applications in user space will continue to run unmodified on Oracle Linux 7 Update 9 with UEK release 6 and no re-certifications are needed for applications already certified with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 or Oracle Linux 7.

Oracle Linux 7 Update 9 is available on 64-bit Arm (aarch64) and 64-bit AMD/Intel (x86-64) based systems. Oracle Linux 7 Update 9 ships with the following kernel packages, which include bug fixes, security fixes, and enhancements...

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Septor 2020.5

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2) System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020 Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1 Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2 Update Tor to 0.4.4.5 Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20 Read more

Incremental backup with Butterfly Backup

This article explains how to make incremental or differential backups, with a catalog available to restore (or export) at the point you want, with Butterfly Backup. Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive. Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop". [...] We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and AMD

  • NVIDIA Ships Vulkan Driver Beta With Fragment Shading Rate Control - Phoronix

    This week's Vulkan 1.2.158 spec release brought the fragment shading rate extension to control the rate at which fragments are shaded on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. This can be useful similar to OpenGL and Direct3D support for helping to allow different, less important areas of the screen be shaded less than areas requiring greater detail/focus. NVIDIA on Tuesday released the 455.26.02 Linux driver (and 457.00 version for Windows) that adds this fragment shading rate extension.

  • Intel Begins Adding Alder Lake Graphics Support To Their Linux Driver - Phoronix

    Intel has begun adding support for Alderlake-S to their open-source Linux kernel graphics driver. An initial set of 18 patches amounting to just around 300 lines of new kernel code was sent out today for beginning the hardware enablement work on Alderlake-S from the graphics side. Yes, it's only a few hundred lines of new driver code due to Alder Lake leveraging the existing Gen12/Tigerlake support. The Alder Lake driver patches similarly re-use some of the same workarounds and changes as set for the 14nm Rocket Lake processors with Gen12 graphics coming out in Q1.

  • AMD Linux Driver Preparing For A Navi "Blockchain" Graphics Card - Phoronix

    While all eyes are on the AMD Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" graphics cards set to be announced next week, it also looks like AMD is preparing for a Navi 1x "Blockchain" graphics card offering given the latest work in their open-source Linux driver. Patches posted today provide support for a new Navi graphics card referred to as the "navi10 blockchain SKU." The Navi 10 part has a device ID of 0x731E. From the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver perspective, the only difference from the existing Navi 10 GPU support is these patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support with this new SKU not having any display support.