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Systemd, Devuan, and Debian; FOSS at the Back End

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Server
Debian
  • Systemd, Devuan, and Debian
  • Devuan ASCII sprint -- 15-16-17 Dec. 2017
  • This open-source, multicloud serverless framework claims faster-than-bare-metal speed

    The move toward fast, serverless computing technology got a boost this month from Iguazio Systems Ltd. The data platform company (named from the Iguazu waterfalls in South America) announced the release of Nuclio, an open-source, multicloud serverless framework that claims faster-than-bare-metal speed.

    “We provide one platform, all the data services that Amazon has, or at least the ones that are interesting, serverless functions, which are 100 times faster, and a few more tricks that they don’t have,” said Yaron Haviv (pictured), founder and chief technology officer of Iguazio Systems. “We do fewer services, but each one kicks ass; each one is much faster and better engineered.”

  • CORD Says It’s the De Facto Choice for Edge Computing

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) today released 4.1 of its Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) code. CORD has only been around as an independent project within ONF for about a year and a half, but with this release a couple of things have gelled for the project. First, it has merged its residential-CORD, mobile-CORD, and enterprise-CORD into one overarching project. Secondly, the ONF has realized CORD’s relevance in edge computing and edge cloud data centers.

Server/Back End: Orange, Oracle, Docker

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Server
  • With OPNFV, Orange Plans a Full-Scale Rollout of Network Functions Virtualization

    Over the past few years, the entire networking industry has begun to transform as network demands rapidly increase. This is true for both the technology itself and the way in which carriers — like my employer Orange, as well as vendors and other service providers — adapt and evolve their approach to meeting these demands. As a result, we’re becoming more and more agile and adept in how we virtualize our evolving network and a shifting ecosystem.” keep up with growing demands and the need to virtualize.

  • Oracle joins the serverless fray with Fn

    With its open source Fn project, Oracle is looking to make a splash in serverless computing.

    Fn is a container native serverless platform that can be run on-premises or in the cloud. It requires the use of Docker containers. Fn developers will be able to write functions in Java initially, with Go, Ruby, Python, PHP, and Node.js support planned for later. Applications can be built and run without users having to provision, scale, or manage servers, by using the cloud.

  • DevOps, Docker, and Empathy

    Just because we’re using containers doesn’t mean that we “do DevOps.” Docker is not some kind of fairy dust that you can sprinkle around your code and applications to deploy faster. It is only a tool, albeit a very powerful one. And like every tool, it can be misused. Guess what happens when we misuse a power tool? Power fuck-ups. Let’s talk about it.

    I’m writing this because I have seen a few people expressing very deep frustrations about Docker, and I would like to extend a hand to show them that instead of being a giant pain in the neck, Docker can help them to work better, and (if that’s their goal) be an advantage rather than a burden in their journey (or their “digital transformation” if we want to speak fancy.)

Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Kubernetes Articles

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  • Deletion and Garbage Collection of Kubernetes Objects

    With the Kubernetes container orchestration engine, concepts and objects build on top of each other. An example we described previously is how deployments build on top of replica sets to ensure availability, and replica sets build on top of Pods to get scheduling for free.

    What exactly happens when we delete a deployment? We would not only expect the deployment itself to be deleted, but also the replica sets and pods that are managed by the deployment.

  • Kubernetes Preview: 'Apps Workloads' Enabled by Default, Windows Capabilities Move Forward

    Kubernetes 1.9 will feature a ready-for-prime-time Apps Workloads, Windows functionality moving into beta and forward moves in storage.

  • Salesforce is latest big tech vendor to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Salesforce announced today that it was joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the open-source organization that manages Kubernetes, the popular open-source container orchestration tool.

    It is the latest in a long line of big name companies, joining the likes of AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal, all of whom joined in a flurry of activity earlier this year. Most of these other companies have more of a cloud infrastructure angle. Salesforce is a SaaS vendor, but it too is seeing what so many others are seeing: containerization provides a way to more tightly control the development process. Kubernetes and cloud native computing in general are a big part of that, and Salesforce wants a piece of the action.

  • How the Cloud Native Computing Foundation Is Advancing Cloud Projects

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) kicked off its Kubecon CloudNativeCon North America conference on Dec. 6 with a host of announcements about its' expanding open-source cloud efforts. The CNCF is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration system as well as 13 additional cloud project that enable organizations to build cloud native architectures.

    Among the announcements at the event, which has over 4,000 attendees, are new members as well as multiple project updates, including 1.0 releases from the containerd, Jaeger, CoreDNS and Fluentd projects.

Linux Foundation's CNCF Growth

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Linux
Server
OSS

Servers: CoreOS, Skills, Kubernetes, Supercomputers and Site Reliability Engineers

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Server
  • New Open Platform Helps Enterprises Manage Their Own Cloud Services

    CoreOS on Tuesday announced the release of Tectonic 1.8, a Kubernetes container management platform. Tectonic enables enterprises to deploy key automation infrastructure components that function like managed cloud services without cloud vendor lock-in.

    The CoreOS Open Cloud Services Catalog offers an alternative to cloud vendors' proprietary services and APIs -- the equivalent of cloud-based offerings developed on open source technologies that enable customers to build their infrastructures within the hybrid environments of their choice.

  • What Tech Skills are Hot (React, Cloud) or Not (Linux, Tableau)

    It’s a good time to have experience in React, the JavaScript library used to create user interfaces, according to a study released this week by job search firm Indeed.com. Meanwhile, a growing number of job seekers are touting their Linux skills, but employers are less interested. And Python’s status is, well, complicated, the Indeed study showed.

    Indeed looked at the changes in search terms used by tech workers and by recruiters over the past two years, considering the October 2015 through September 2016 and October 2016 through September 2017 time periods. According to that analysis, React is up 313 percent year over year as a job seeker interest, and 229 percent as an employer interest. Cloud computing skills also appear to be blazingly hot, with interest in Amazon Web Services up 98 percent for job seekers and 40 percent for employers. Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing platform saw a 31-percent boost in searches by job seekers and a 62-percent jump for employers.

  • Open-Source Cloudify Delivers Multi-Stack Interoperability for Kubernetes & Robust Security, Bridging the Gap Between Application & Network Virtualization
  • Linux on Supercomputers

    Today, I did a presentation about Linux on Supercomputers at the Faculty of Industrial of UNMSM for its annivrsary. It was published the event in the Intranet of the School.

  • 7 Habits of Highly Successful Site Reliability Engineers

    In a recent post, we examined the rise of the Site Reliability Engineer in modern software organizations. But it’s one thing just to be called a SRE; we also wanted to know what it takes to become a great one.

    So we decided to look at some of the characteristics and habits common to highly successful SREs. As in most development and operations roles, first-class technical chops are obviously critical. For SREs, those specific skills might depend on how a particular organization defines or approaches the role: the Google approach to Site Reliability Engineering might require more software engineering and coding experience, whereas another organization might place a higher value on ops or QA skills. But as we found when we looked at what makes dev and ops practitioners successful, what sets the “great” apart from the “good enough” is often a combination of habits and traits that complement technical expertise.

Kubernetes in Storage, Bitnami

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Server
  • Running storage services on Kubernetes

    If you are looking to adopt the benefits of containers, introduce and support a DevOps culture in your organization, run micro-services or in general try to get corporate IT to provide more immediate value to the business by shortening the time to market, you will at least evaluate Kubernetes. When you adopt it, it won't be long until stateful applications find their way into the cluster—and with that the need for robust, persistent storage. Will databases be among those applications? Very likely. Or workloads, that share large content repositories or such that consume object storage? In either of those cases, you should definitely take a look at gluster-kubernetes.

  • Bitnami Introduces Kubeapps for Click and Deploy Kubernetes Containers

    At KubeCon, Bitnami demonstrated a tool for deploying pre-packaged Kubernetes containers with the click of a mouse.

More on OpenStack and Kubernetes

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Server

Server: Pivotal, OpenStack, CoreOS

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Server
  • Pivotal Expands Cloud Foundry and Container Services

    Pivotal announced the latest update to its Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform on Dec. 5, along with a preview of the company's Kubernetes-powered container service and the launch of a new serverless effort.

    Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF), Pivotal's core platform since the company was spun out from VMware in April 2013, is based on the open-source Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS) project. The PaaS market has shifted over the last four years and so has Pivotal, which is why the new Kubernetes and serverless projects are important to the company and its customers.

  • OpenStack Launches Open Source ‘Kata Containers’ Project

    The OpenStack Foundation today announced a new open source project — Kata Containers. Its goal is to unite the security advantages of virtual machines (VMs) with the speed and manageability of containers.

    The project is designed to be hardware agnostic and compatible with the Open Container Initiative (OCI) specification for Docker containers as well as the container runtime interface (CRI) for Kubernetes.

  • OpenStack Launches Kata Containers Project to Improve Security

    The OpenStack Foundation announced a new effort called Kata Containers on Dec. 5, in a bid to help organizations deploy and run containers more securely in the cloud.

    The Kata Containers project will be run as a separate project from the main OpenStack cloud platform, with its own governance and project direction. At the core of Kata Containers are code contributions from Intel with Clear Containers and Hyper with runV. Other companies supporting the project at launch include 99cloud, AWcloud, Canonical, China Mobile, City Network, CoreOS, Dell/EMC, EasyStack, Fiberhome, Google, Huawei, JD.com, Mirantis, SUSE, Tencent, Ucloud and ZTE.

  • CoreOS Adds Latest Kubernetes Release, Open Source Model to Tectonic

CoreOS Tectonic 1.8

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • CoreOS Tectonic 1.8 makes it easy to plug external services into Kubernetes

    CoreOS announced Tectonic 1.8, its latest update of the popular Kubernetes container orchestration tool. It features a new open services catalog that enables DevOps personnel to plug in external services into Kubernetes with ease.

    As Rob Szumski, Tectonic product manager at CoreOS pointed out in a company blog post announcing the new version, public clouds offer lots of benefits around ease of use, but they can end up locking you in, in some cases to a proprietary set of tools.

    This is precisely what the new Open Cloud Services catalog is designed to resolve. Instead of using those proprietary tools, you get more open choices and that should make it easier to move between clouds or a hybrid environment.

  • CoreOS adds open-source infrastructure services to its Tectonic Kubernetes platform

    Software container company CoreOS Inc. is updating its popular Tectonic platform, adding a number of open-source services that serve as alternatives to proprietary infrastructure components from public cloud companies.

    CoreOS’s Tectonic platform is essentially an enterprise-grade version of the Kubernetes container orchestration tool, which is used to manage clusters of software containers, which in turn allow applications to run on any computer platform. The company also offers the Container Linux operating system, and the Quay container registry service, which together serve as an alternative to the better-known container infrastructure offered by Docker Inc.

Server and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
Server
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More in Tux Machines

Games: Radeon Benchmarks, New Games, and CrossOver 17

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. RADV/RadeonSI Radeon Linux Gaming Performance
    With today's AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver release alongside the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver for Windows users, it's significant in a few ways. First and foremost, AMD has stuck to their word of the past two years and is now able to open-source their official Vulkan Linux driver. When it comes to AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 itself you are now able to mix-and-match driver components to choose what pieces you want of AMD's somewhat complicated driver make-up. Additionally, their OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in 17.50 have some new feature capabilities. So with that said here's a fresh look at how the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 professional driver performance compares to the latest open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers.
  • The End Is Nigh for Linux gamers is now out of beta on Steam
    Did you get a little worried at the start of that headline? Fret not, as it's about the game 'The End Is Nigh' and it's now out of beta on Steam for Linux.
  • The GOG winter sale is on, you can grab Grim Fandango Remastered for free
  • Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games Directly on Your Mac or Linux OS
    It’s almost 2018, and for some reason there still exists an obnoxious barrier between Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems when it comes to running apps and playing games. CrossOver 17 for Linux was designed to break that tedious barrier down, by allowing you to run your favorite Windows apps and games directly on your Mac or Linux computer, and it’s available for over 50% off at just $19.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • NVIDIA Pushes Out CUDA 9.1 With Compiler Optimizations, Volta Enhancements & More
    AMD isn't the only one busy with GPU software updates today but NVIDIA has issued CUDA 9.1 as their first feature update to the CUDA 9 compute platform.
  • Happy Holidays: AMD Finally Pushing Out Open-Source Vulkan Driver
    Ahead of the Vulkan 1.0 debut nearly two years ago, we heard that for AMD's Vulkan Linux driver it was initially going to be closed-source and would then be open-sourced once ready. At the time it sounded like something that would be opened up six months or so, but finally that milestone is being reached! Ahead of Christmas, AMD is publishing the source code to their official Vulkan Linux driver.
  • The Feature Differences Now Between AMD's Two OpenGL & Two Vulkan Linux Drivers
    For modern AMD graphics cards there are two OpenGL drivers and two Vulkan drivers available to Linux users/gamers that support the same modern AMD GPUs, not counting the older AMD Linux drivers, etc. Here's a rundown now on how those drivers compare. With AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 now allowing you to mix and match driver components and AMD finally open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver, the scene may be even more confusing about which AMD Linux driver(s) to use depending upon your use-case.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers
    There's more Radeon Linux excitement today beyond AMD finally open-sourcing their Vulkan driver. Coming out today is the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 driver that bundles in the open-source RADV and RadeonSI drivers too, in letting you "mix and match" the driver components you want for your system.

End of Fedora 27 Modular Server

  • Fedora 27 Server classic release after all — and Modularity goes back to the drawing board
    You may remember reading about plans for Fedora 27 Server. The working group decided not to release that at the same time as the general F27 release, and instead provided a beta of Fedora 27 Modular Server. Based on feedback from that beta, they decided to take a different approach, and the Modularity subproject is going back to the drawing board. Fortunately, there is a contingency plan: Fedora’s release engineering team made a “classic” version of Fedora 27 Server — very similar to F26 Server, but with F27’s updated package set. The quality assurance ran this version through validation testing, and it’s being released, so:
  • Fedora 27 Modular Server Gets Canned; Fedora 27 Server Classic Released
    - The Fedora Project's plans on delivering an initial "Fedora 27 Modular Server" build constructed under their new packaging principles has been thwarted. Due to less than stellar feedback on their Fedora 27 Modular Server build, the Fedora Modular working group is going back to the drawing board for determining a brighter future to its design. Previous to being canned, F27 Modular Server was delayed to January but is now being abandoned in its current form.

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day