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Open source log management options for Linux distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

If you run Linux, you're probably familiar with rsyslog and systemd-journald. However, if you oversee dozens of Linux servers and cloud instances, it's not realistic to dig into each individual log file. Graylog and Logcheck are two viable open source alternatives.

When you search for open source log management software, you will see that Graylog is one of the most adopted products. The program can be easily installed on common Linux distributions, including CentOS and Ubuntu, and is available as an appliance.

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Servers With GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Linux Foundation Shifts Network Infrastructure to Kubernetes

    The Linux Networking Fund (LNF) is making significant progress toward embracing Kubernetes as a platform for delivering a range of networking services that are expected to be widely embraced by telecommunications carriers and cloud service providers (CSP).

    Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking an orchestration for The Linux Foundation, says the latest Beijing release of the Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP) contains several modules that have been ported to Kubernetes, with more to follow once the Casablanca release of ONAP is released.

  • A Platform Of A Certain Age And Respectability

    But seriously. The many rivals of the OS/400 platform and its follow-ons since that June 21, 1988, launch of the Application System/400 are now gone or not even on life support. We can all rattle them off, but the important ones that drove innovation for OS/400 and its children through to the current IBM i are DEC’s VMS for the VAX and Alpha systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s MPE for the HP 3000 and HP-UX for the HP 9000s, and Sun Microsystems’ Solaris for the Sparc systems. You could throw in SCO Unix, Novell NetWare, and a slew of proprietary operating systems in Europe and Japan, and while you are at it, you should probably also include the IBM System/38’s CPF operating system and the IBM System/36’s SSP operating system. Even OS/2 and its PS/2 platform actually predate the AS/400 by 10 months – and they are long, long gone.

  • Uptycs Raises $13M, Launches Osquery-Based Security Platform

    No. 2 is the growing popularity of Mac and Linux-based infrastructure. Traditional enterprise workloads are deployed on Windows, so that’s where malicious activity historically occurred. But now more companies are using Mac infrastructure and transitioning new workloads to Linux in the cloud. Companies need to monitor and secure these environments as well, and Uptycs’ security platform covers all of the above.

  • CeBIT 2018: Huawei to roll-out KunLun V5 server

    Huawei is set to launch the latest server in its KunLun mission critical range with the V5, teaming up once more with Suse, further confirming that the company’s Linux Enterprise Server system is its preferred standard for the range.

  • Why an Infrastructure Transition is the Perfect Time to Invest in Security

    The idea behind containers has been around since the 1970s, when the technology was first used to isolate application code on Unix systems. However, the use of containers only became widespread in 2013 with the advent of Docker, and container orchestration tools like Kubernetes are even newer than that.

What Is the Intersection of OpenStack and Kubernetes?

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Server

Lew Tucker is a busy man. Aside from his day job as VP and CTO for Cloud Computing at Cisco, Tucker also sits on the board of directors at both the OpenStack Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, giving him a unique perspective on both organizations.

Some in the industry have positioned Kubernetes as a competitive replacement for OpenStack, but that's not what Tucker sees. In a video interview, Tucker explains where the intersection currently exists between OpenStack and Kubernetes and why he expects both to be successful.

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CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 Released for Those Who Want to Run Linux Containers

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OS
Linux
Server

Coming about a month after the release of the CentOS Linux 7.5 (1804) operating system for 64-bit (x86_64), 32-bit (i386), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit (ppc64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64le), and ARM-hfp (armhfp) compatible machines, CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is now available to download.

CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is built from standard CentOS Linux 7 RPMs and the upstream packages included in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.5 operating system. CentOS Linux is a free and open-source computer operating system for desktops and servers that's always based on the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases.

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Server Domination by GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time

    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report.

    Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing.

    The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”

  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer

    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer.

    HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.

Containers and 'Clouds'

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Server
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #39 – CI/CD and Kubernetes

    One of the characteristics of the most successful deployments of OpenShift are the CI/CD pipelines that enable application integrations. This week we dove into a question from a listener – “Can you talk more about best practices for integrating CI/CD systems into Kubernetes?“

    Brian and Tyler talk about the latest news from the Kubernetes community, the difference between CI and CD, and various considerations for integrating CI/CD environments with Kubernetes.

  • Partners See Docker's 'Promise Of Choice' As A Unique Inroad To Enterprise Customers
  • Docker’s Name and Operations Could Appeal to Microsoft, Red Hat, VMware

    Docker Inc. owns one of the most prominent names in the cloud container ecosystem. But a recent report from Cowen and Company named a handful of established cloud players as potential acquirers of Docker Inc. Those included Microsoft, Red Hat, and VMware, with the first two deemed most likely to take the plunge.

    “Despite its strong name recognition and customer momentum, Docker’s long-term financial success – at least as an independent company – is hardly a fait accompli,” the Cowen and Company report stated. “We do believe that Docker will have to work hard in order to overcome its smaller footprint with enterprise companies.”

  • Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud

    The savings in cloud computing comes at the expense of a loss of control over your systems, which is summed up best in the popular nerd sticker that says, "The Cloud is Just Other People's Computers."

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

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GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft
  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers

    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer.

    But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.

  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty

     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.  

Server: HPC, Docker, and Loss of Control in Age of 'Cloud', Kubernetes etc.

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Server
  • Team USA Fans Set to Celebrate Expected Supercomputer Win
  • How Docker's CEO Is Growing the Container Pioneer for the Future

    Steve Singh has a very succinct vision for Docker. He wants to enable companies to modernize traditional applications with the Docker container platform. It's a vision that is already transforming into market success for Docker as the company has grown from what Singh said was single-digit million-dollar revenue in 2016 to being on track for triple-digit million-dollar revenue for 2018.

    Since becoming CEO of Docker in May 2017, Singh has helped transform the container pioneer itself. In October 2017, at his first DockerCon, Singh's company announced that it was embracing the once rival Kubernetes container orchestration system. At DockerCon 18, Docker announced new multicloud federation capabilities and developer improvements to the Docker Desktop.

  • imagine you no longer own your infrastructure

    Sounds crazy and nobody would ever do that, but just for a moment imagine you no longer own your infrastructure.

    Imagine you just run your container on something like GKE with Kubernetes.

    Imagine you build your software with something like Jenkins running in a container, using the GKE provided docker interface to build stuff in another container.

    [...]

    But this time it's not your infrastructure and you can not modify the operating system context your docker container are running in.

    Sounds insane, right? Luckily we're just making up a crazy story and something like that would never happen in the real world, because we all insist on owning our infrastructure.

Canonical Cuts Its Own Path To Put Linux In The Cloud

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GNU
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

Linux has gradually grown in importance along with the Internet and now the hyperscalers that define the next generation of experience on that global network. Most of the software running at the hyperscalers – with the exception of Microsoft, of course, is built upon Linux and other open source technologies. In turn, this means that Linux and open source have started to become more important in the enterprise arena, as trends such as cloud computing and large scale data analytics drove the need for similar technologies in the corporate datacenter.

Adapting the collection of open source packages that comprise a typical Linux build and making it suitable for enterprise consumption has led to carefully curated distributions that emphasise reliability and stability, plus paid technical support services and maintenance updates. These are typified by Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), distributions that have a long product lifecycle of ten years and thirteen years, respectively.

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How Docker Is Helping to Save The World (Literally)

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Server
Sci/Tech

There are many different things that individuals might consider to be a life threatening event and then there are extinction level events, for example an asteroid hitting Earth.

While the idea of an asteroid hitting Earth and ending all life is the stuff of Hollywood movie like Armageddon, it's an actual, though remote, possibility that NASA is investigating, with the help of Docker containers.

NASA is currently developing a mission known as DART - the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, which is a spacecraft that will deploy a kinetic impact technique to deflect an asteroid. Christopher Heistand, DART Flight Software Lead, at the The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) that is helping to build the DART ship, detailed how his group is using Docker.

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