Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

A Variety Of OpenGL/OpenCL NVIDIA 367.27 vs. AMD Linux 4.7 + Mesa Git Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For your viewing pleasure this afternoon are some fresh NVIDIA GeForce GTX 900/1000 benchmarks with the 367.27 display driver compared to various Radeon GCN GPUs using a patched Linux 4.7 kernel and Mesa 12.1-dev Git as of this past weekend.

Read more

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Significant Linux 4.7 Kernel Performance Regression Has Now Been Resolved

    There was a 30~40% drop in some of the SPEC Java benchmarks when using the Linux 4.7 development code, but fortunately this regression has now been discovered and addressed.

  • What You Need To Do To Your Linux System If You Want Open-Source RX 480 Support

    If you are hoping to get your hands on a Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" graphics card when they begin shipping in a few days, here are the upgrades you need to make to your Linux system if you are wanting to make use of the open-source AMD Linux graphics stack.

  • Some Of The AMDGPU Changes Being Worked On For Linux 4.8

    The AMD developers still have a few more weeks to get their new feature material ready for the Linux 4.8 kernel while here is an early look at some of the code merged so far.

    One of the changes we're looking forward to most with the AMDGPU DRM of Linux 4.8 is the OverDrive overclocking support. Finally the ability with the open-source AMD stack to overclock your GPU easily, but it's only supported for AMDGPU-capable hardware. There are commits though in the 4.8 W.I.P. branch for enabling the overclocking for Sea Islands with that experimental AMDGPU support. Another addition since the original AMDGPU overclocking support is there's now support for video memory overclocking too. Similar to the GPU core re-clocking, the memory overclocking can be done up to 20% in 1% steps.

  • Dolphin Emulator Is Working On A Vulkan Backend

The Relative Windows vs. Linux Performance For NVIDIA, Intel & AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the recent Windows vs. Linux AMDGPU-PRO / RadeonSI testing, GTX 1080 Windows vs. Linux results, and yesterday's Intel Windows vs. Linux benchmarks, here is a look at all three sets of numbers when using some OpenBenchmarking.org magic to merge the data-sets and normalize the results.

Read more

NVIDIA Linux Performance-Per-Dollar: What The RX 480 Will Have To Compete Against

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

There's a lot of benchmarking going on this weekend at Phoronix in preparation for next week's Radeon RX 480 Linux review. Here are some fresh results on the NVIDIA side showing the current performance-per-dollar data for the NVIDIA Maxwell and Pascal graphics cards for seeing what the RX 480 "Polaris 10" card will be competing against under Linux.

Read more

7-Way Linux Distribution Comparison For Summer 2016

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of Fedora 24, Solus 1.2, and other GNU/Linux distribution updates, here is our latest performance testing roundabout of seven popular OS releases on the same Core i5 Skylake system.

Read more

Radeon RX 480 Linux Testing Is Happening Right Now

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Not that I can share any early benchmark figures or anything of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" graphics card, but the testing commenced today... But I can at least share a couple images.

Yep, AMD sent over a Radeon RX 480 graphics card for being able to provide launch-day Linux benchmarks next week. That day is 29 June when the embargo expires and the RX 480 cards will begin to hit stores for the $199+ price-tag (or slightly more for the 8GB version).

Read more

Kernel Space Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Trying Various OpenGL 4.x Games On Linux With An Intel Skylake Core i5

    With the imminent Mesa 12.0 release there is now OpenGL 4.3 compliance for Intel Broadwell graphics hardware and newer, rather than OpenGL 3.3 as was the upper limit in the Intel Mesa driver to this point. Now having OpenGL 4.x support with this open-source Intel driver, I decided to see how various OpenGL 4.x games are running with the Intel driver when using a Skylake CPU sporting HD Graphics 530.

  • AMDGPU Fixes For Polaris Queuing Up For Linux 4.7

    Yesterday I mentioned how the AMDGPU driver needed some important last minute fixes for the soon-to-launch Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" support. Those patches are now pending to be pulled as part of the next round of DRM fixes heading into Linux 4.7.

  • Intel Submits Another Batch Of DRM Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.8

    Just weeks after their first round of DRM updates for Linux 4.8 were submitted, the Intel crew has their second -- of a possible three -- feature updates readied for the Linux 4.8 kernel via DRM-Next.

  • Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Last RC Is Out Now

    As expected, the fourth and last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 has been announced on June 21, 2016, by Collabora's Emil Velikov.

    Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Release Candidate 4 incorporates the latest fixes and improvements that the development team behind the open-source Mesa 3D project managed to introduce during the last week, since the release of the third Mesa 3D 12.0.0 RC build.

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying The Intel Vulkan Driver On Skylake With Dota 2 + Talos Principle

    With the recent report that Intel's Vulkan Linux driver should now work with Dota 2, I was curious to test out the game -- and Talos Principle -- with the latest Mesa Git code that houses this open-source "Anvil" Vulkan driver.

    With the Padoka PPA now shipping the Intel Vulkan driver by default, it's super easy on Ubuntu-based Linux systems to fetch a Mesa Git snapshot within the past day or two that does have the Vulkan driver for Intel hardware built and enabled. So that's what I went with for trying Mesa 12.1-dev state of the Intel Vulkan driver as of today on a Core i5 6600K "Skylake" box running Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Why The R9 290 & Other Select Radeon GPUs Are Performing Miserably On Linux 4.7

    With this weekend's 5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison and other tests I've done on Linux 4.7 Git with Radeon hardware, the R9 290 has regressed to the point of performing noticeably worse than other AMD GCN GPUs... Many other Phoronix readers with different Rx 200/300 graphics cards have also confirmed their graphics cards performing poorly on Linux 4.7.

  • NVIDIA Launches Tesla P100 PCI-E Card
  • Mesa Lands Support For GL_EXT_window_rectangles

    The newest OpenGL extension now supported by Mesa is GL_EXT_window_rectangles.

    GL_EXT_window_rectangles is a newer OpenGL extension and explained via the OpenGL.org registry, "this extension provides additional orthogonally aligned 'window rectangles' specified in window-space coordinates that restrict rasterization of all primitive types (geometry, images, paths) and framebuffer clears."

5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the massive Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With Radeon Software, AMDGPU-PRO, AMDGPU+RadeonSI article, I immediately started work on my next article... In preparation for a hardware launch Linux testing later this month, I started testing my collection of AMD cards on Linux 4.7 and Mesa 12.1-dev. Here are some of those results if you are curious, including performance-per-Watt metrics.

The cards tested so far this weekend on this bleeding-edge driver stack were the R9 270X, R9 285, R9 290, R7 370, and R9 Fury. Mesa 12.1-dev was from Git yesterday using the Padoka PPA and also built with LLVM 3.9 SVN. The Linux 4.7 kernel was from Git in the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA this week.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. Read more

What is the Fedora Modularity project and how do you get involved ?

The Fedora Modularity Project is an effort to fix several problems that all distributions face. One of them is the disconnect between Fedora's release cycle and the release cycle of larger Fedora components like for example GNOME, KDE or even the kernel. Those components obviously don't have the same lifecycle that Fedora follows and Fedora can't always wait for major components to be released upstream and on the other hand doesn't want to ship outdated software. An earlier attempt to work around this disconnect were the Fedora Rings with a central core 'base design', a concentric ring #2 around it for 'environments and stacks' and a ring #3 for applications. It wasn't possible to have different release cycles for packages in ring #2 as dependencies wouldn't allow that most of the time. Read more

antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior. Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here! New Releases!

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. In this article, I'll walk you through some of the differences between these two freedoms and how they affect Linux usage. Read more