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Graphics/Benchmarks

Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While it was not too long ago that Microsoft Windows Server 2019 began shipping and that we conducted some end-of-year benchmarks between Windows and Linux, with being in the process of running a number of Windows and Linux benchmarks as part of our ongoing 10GbE OS performance testing, I also took the opportunity to run some other benchmarks on Windows Server 2016 and 2019 as well as a set of Linux distributions.

With carrying out the fresh OS installations anyways for the network testing, with recently having brought over some more Phoronix Test Suite test profiles with Windows support, I decided to run some fresh Windows Server vs. Linux benchmarks anyways. Granted, not all of the tests are server-oriented and not all of the traditional Linux server distributions were used. Just take this as you wish of some fresh Windows vs. Linux performance benchmarks.

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Phoronix Test Suite Improvements

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Making It Even Easier To Gauge Your System's Performance

    For those trying to understand their system's performance on a macro level will enjoy a new feature being introduced with Phoronix Test Suite 8.6-Spydeberg for seeing how your CPU/system/GPU/storage/network performance compares at scale to the massive data sets amassed by OpenBenchmarking.org and the Phoronix Test Suite over the past decade.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 Milestone 2 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking

    Two weeks since the initial Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 development release, the second milestone release is now available for your open-source, cross-platform benchmarking evaluation.

Out-Of-The-Box 10GbE Network Benchmarks On Nine Linux Distributions Plus FreeBSD 12

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I started running some fresh 10GbE Linux networking performance benchmarks across a few different Linux distributions. That testing has now been extended to cover nine Linux distributions plus FreeBSD 12.0 to compare the out-of-the-box networking performance.

Tested this round alongside FreeBSD 12.0 was Antergos 19.1, CentOS 7, Clear Linux, Debian 9.6, Fedora Server 29, openSUSE Leap 15.0, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.10.

All of the tests were done with a Tyan S7106 1U server featuring two Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, 96GB of DDR4 system memory, and Samsung 970 EVO SSD. For the 10GbE connectivity on this server was an add-in HP NC523SFP PCIe adapter providing two 10Gb SPF+ ports using a QLogic 8214 controller.

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Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD
  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux

    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time.

    Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.

  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support

    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.

  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve

    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey.

    In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.

Mesa 18.2 vs. 18.3 vs. 19.0 January Benchmarks For RadeonSI/RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With Mesa 19.0 entering its feature freeze before the month is through, here are fresh benchmarks of the very latest RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan performance on Polaris and Vega graphics cards compared to the current stable Mesa 18.3 series and the former 18.2 release. This testing is complementary to last week's Mesa 19.0 RADV vs. AMDVLK vs. AMDGPU-PRO Vulkan tests.

For the purposes of seeing how the latest Mesa 19.0 is stacking up on the Radeon side, tests were done with a Radeon RX 580 Polaris and Radeon RX Vega 56. Tests were done using Mesa 19.0-devel from the Padoka PPA built against LLVM 8.0 SVN AMDGPU and then against Mesa 18.3.1 stable with LLVM 7.0.0 (from the Pkppa) and then Mesa 18.2.2 built against LLVM 7.0 as is shipped by default currently on Ubuntu 18.10. So not only are we looking to see the current performance benefits of Mesa 19 but also whether the performance upgrade is worthwhile for those otherwise using the stock Mesa shipped by the current Ubuntu release.

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AMDGPU-PRO 18.50 vs. ROCm 2.0 OpenCL Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

When recently publishing the PlaidML deep learning benchmarks and lczero chess neural network OpenCL tests, some Phoronix readers mentioned they were seeing vastly different results with using the PAL OpenCL driver in AMDGPU-PRO (Radeon Software) compared to using the ROCm compute stack. So for seeing how those two separate AMD OpenCL drivers compare, here are some benchmark results with a Vega GPU while testing ROCm 2.0 and AMDGPU-PRO 18.50.

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Linux 4.20 Allows Overclockers To Increase The Radeon TDP Power Limit

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The AMDGPU Linux kernel driver for a while has now offered command-line-driven OverDrive overclocking for recent generations of Radeon GPUs. This has allowed manipulating the core and memory clock speeds as well as tweaking the voltage but has not supported increasing the TDP limit of the graphics card: that's in place with Linux 4.20

Up until now with the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver there hasn't been support for increasing the TDP power limit beyond its default, but has allowed for reducing that limit should you be trying to conserve power / allow your GPU to run cooler. A change was quietly added to the Linux 4.20 kernel to allow increasing the power limit when in the OverDrive mode.

This change wasn't prominently advertised but fortunately a Phoronix reader happened to run across it today and tipped us off.

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Graphics: Nouvea, NVIDIA RTX "Turing", KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta Wayland Session, Qt5 GUIs With Spying

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Open-Source Driver Will Now Work With NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti On Linux 5.0

    Among the many Linux 5.0 kernel features is initial open-source NVIDIA driver support for the latest-generation Turing graphics processors. Missed out on during the Linux 5.0 merge window was "TU102" support but now that is coming down as a fix for the 5.0 kernel.

    Back in December, Ben Skeggs of Red Hat posted the initial Turing support for Nouveau in the form of the TU104 (RTX 2080) and TU106 (RTX 2060/2070) but was lacking coverage of the TU102, which is for the flagship RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX. He wasn't able to test the support at the time and thus left it out. Skeggs has now been able to verify the TU102 support is working and that patch is now on its way to the mainline kernel tree.

  • Quake 2 Gets Real-Time Path Tracing Powered By NVIDIA RTX / VK_NV_ray_tracing

    For those Linux gamers with a NVIDIA RTX "Turing" graphics card, there's finally an interesting open-source workload to enjoy that makes use of the RTX hardware and NVIDIA's VK_NV_ray_tracing extension... A real-time path tracing port of the legendary Quake 2 game.

    While Quake II recently saw a Vulkan port, university students have now done an "RTX" port for Quake 2 with the new Q2VKPT project.

  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta Wayland Run Through

    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta the Wayland Session. Please keep in mind that it is still in development and the Xorg session is perfect.

  • Qt 5.13 Might Add QTelemetry For Opt-In Anonymous Data Collection

    The next release of the Qt5 tool-kit might introduce a potentially controversial module to facilitate anonymous data collection of Qt applications. 

    The addition of Qt Telemetry has been under code review since last September. There was some reviews taking place and code revisions happening but since November that review dried up. 

WLinux & WLinux Enterprise Benchmarks, The Linux Distributions Built For Windows 10 WSL

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Making the news rounds a few months back was "WLinux", which was the first Linux distribution designed for Microsoft's Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) on Windows 10. But is this pay-to-play Linux distribution any faster than the likes of Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Debian already available from the Microsoft Store? Here are some benchmarks of these different Linux distribution options with WSL.

WLinux is a Linux distribution derived from Debian that is focused on offering an optimal WSL experience. This distribution isn't spun by Microsoft but a startup called Whitewater Foundry. WLinux focuses on providing good defaults for WSL with the catering of its default package set while the Debian archive via APT is still accessible. There is also support for graphical applications when paired with a Windows-based X client. For this easy-setup, quick-to-get-going Linux distribution on WSL, it retails for $19.99 USD from the Microsoft Store though often sells for $9.99 USD.

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Mesa 18.3.2

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 18.3.2 is now available.

In this release candidate we have added more PCI IDs for AMD Vega devices and
a number of fixes for the RADV Vulkan drivers.

On the Intel side we have a selection ranging from quad swizzles support for
ICL to compiler fixes.

The nine state tracker has also seen some love as do the Broadcom drivers.

To top it all up, we have a healthy mount of build system fixes.

Alex Deucher (3):
pci_ids: add new vega10 pci ids
pci_ids: add new vega20 pci id
pci_ids: add new VegaM pci id

Alexander von Gluck IV (1):
egl/haiku: Fix reference to disp vs dpy

Andres Gomez (2):
glsl: correct typo in GLSL compilation error message
glsl/linker: specify proper direction in location aliasing error

Axel Davy (3):
st/nine: Fix volumetexture dtor on ctor failure
st/nine: Bind src not dst in nine_context_box_upload
st/nine: Add src reference to nine_context_range_upload

Bas Nieuwenhuizen (5):
radv: Do a cache flush if needed before reading predicates.
radv: Implement buffer stores with less than 4 components.
anv/android: Do not reject storage images.
radv: Fix rasterization precision bits.
spirv: Fix matrix parameters in function calls.

Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (3):
nir: properly clear the entry sources in copy_prop_vars
nir: properly find the entry to keep in copy_prop_vars
nir: remove dead code from copy_prop_vars

Dave Airlie (2):
radv/xfb: fix counter buffer bounds checks.
virgl/vtest: fix front buffer flush with protocol version 0.

Dylan Baker (6):
meson: Fix ppc64 little endian detection
meson: Add support for gnu hurd
meson: Add toggle for glx-direct
meson: Override C++ standard to gnu++11 when building with altivec on ppc64
meson: Error out if building nouveau and using LLVM without rtti
autotools: Remove tegra vdpau driver

Emil Velikov (13):
docs: add sha256 checksums for 18.3.1
bin/get-pick-list.sh: rework handing of sha nominations
bin/get-pick-list.sh: warn when commit lists invalid sha
cherry-ignore: meson: libfreedreno depends upon libdrm (for fence support)
glx: mandate xf86vidmode only for "drm" dri platforms
meson: don't require glx/egl/gbm with gallium drivers
pipe-loader: meson: reference correct library
TODO: glx: meson: build dri based glx tests, only with -Dglx=dri
glx: meson: drop includes from a link-only library
glx: meson: wire up the dispatch-index-check test
glx/test: meson: assorted include fixes
Update version to 18.3.2
docs: add release notes for 18.3.2

Eric Anholt (6):
v3d: Fix a leak of the transfer helper on screen destroy.
vc4: Fix a leak of the transfer helper on screen destroy.
v3d: Fix a leak of the disassembled instruction string during debug dumps.
v3d: Make sure that a thrsw doesn't split a multop from its umul24.
v3d: Add missing flagging of SYNCB as a TSY op.
gallium/ttn: Fix setup of outputs_written.

Erik Faye-Lund (2):
virgl: wrap vertex element state in a struct
virgl: work around bad assumptions in virglrenderer

Francisco Jerez (5):
intel/fs: Handle source modifiers in lower_integer_multiplication().
intel/fs: Implement quad swizzles on ICL+.
intel/fs: Fix bug in lower_simd_width while splitting an instruction which was already split.
intel/eu/gen7: Fix brw_MOV() with DF destination and strided source.
intel/fs: Respect CHV/BXT regioning restrictions in copy propagation pass.

Ian Romanick (2):
i965/vec4/dce: Don't narrow the write mask if the flags are used
Revert "nir/lower_indirect: Bail early if modes == 0"

Jan Vesely (1):
clover: Fix build after clang r348827

Jason Ekstrand (6):
nir/constant_folding: Fix source bit size logic
intel/blorp: Be more conservative about copying clear colors
spirv: Handle any bit size in vector_insert/extract
anv/apply_pipeline_layout: Set the cursor in lower_res_reindex_intrinsic
spirv: Sign-extend array indices
intel/peephole_ffma: Fix swizzle propagation

Karol Herbst (1):
nv50/ir: fix use-after-free in ConstantFolding::visit

Kirill Burtsev (1):
loader: free error state, when checking the drawable type

Lionel Landwerlin (5):
anv: don't do partial resolve on layer > 0
i965: include draw_params/derived_draw_params for VF cache workaround
i965: add CS stall on VF invalidation workaround
anv: explictly specify format for blorp ccs/mcs op
anv: flush fast clear colors into compressed surfaces

Marek Olšák (1):
st/mesa: don't leak pipe_surface if pipe_context is not current

Mario Kleiner (1):
radeonsi: Fix use of 1- or 2- component GL_DOUBLE vbo's.

Nicolai Hähnle (1):
meson: link LLVM 'native' component when LLVM is available

Rhys Perry (3):
radv: don't set surf_index for stencil-only images
ac/nir,radv,radeonsi/nir: use correct indices for interpolation intrinsics
ac: split 16-bit ssbo loads that may not be dword aligned

Rob Clark (2):
freedreno/drm: fix memory leak
mesa/st/nir: fix missing nir_compact_varyings

Samuel Pitoiset (1):
radv: switch on EOP when primitive restart is enabled with triangle strips

Timothy Arceri (2):
tgsi/scan: fix loop exit point in tgsi_scan_tess_ctrl()
tgsi/scan: correctly walk instructions in tgsi_scan_tess_ctrl()

Vinson Lee (2):
meson: Fix typo.
meson: Fix libsensors detection.

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Also: Mesa 18.3.2 Released With Many Fixes As Users Encouraged To Upgrade

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

While it was not too long ago that Microsoft Windows Server 2019 began shipping and that we conducted some end-of-year benchmarks between Windows and Linux, with being in the process of running a number of Windows and Linux benchmarks as part of our ongoing 10GbE OS performance testing, I also took the opportunity to run some other benchmarks on Windows Server 2016 and 2019 as well as a set of Linux distributions. With carrying out the fresh OS installations anyways for the network testing, with recently having brought over some more Phoronix Test Suite test profiles with Windows support, I decided to run some fresh Windows Server vs. Linux benchmarks anyways. Granted, not all of the tests are server-oriented and not all of the traditional Linux server distributions were used. Just take this as you wish of some fresh Windows vs. Linux performance benchmarks. Read more

Games: Lutris, Little Mouse's Encyclopedia, Team Fortress 2 and More

Roundup of Wine 4.0 Release Coverage

  • Wine 4.0 Released
    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 4.0 is now available.
  • Wine 4.0 Officially Released with Vulkan & Direct3D 12 Support, HiDPI on Android
    The Wine project proudly announced today the general availability of the Wine 4.0 release, a major version of the open-source software that lets Linux and macOS users install and use Windows apps on their computers. Wine 4.0 comes about a year after the Wine 3.0 release, which was the first to introduce an Android driver to allow users run Windows apps and games on devices powered by Google's Android mobile OS, Direct3D 11 support by default for AMD Radeon and Intel GPUs, a task scheduler, as well as AES encryption support on macOS. With Wine 4.0, the team continues to improve the free and open-source compatibility layer that allows Windows program to run on Linux and Mac computers, adding new features like support for the next-generation Vulkan graphics API, Direct3D 12 support, HiDPI (High-DPI) support on Android, and support for game controllers.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With New Features: Run Windows Apps On Linux Efficiently
    With Microsoft’s initiative to bring Linux Bash Shell on Windows 10, the Windows users are now able to run their favorite Linux tools on their current operating system. But what if you need to run full-fledged Windows apps and games on a Linux distro? In that case, a software like Wine is really helpful. The developers of this utility have recently released the new version, i.e., 4.0, with lots of features. Wine 4.0 is the result of a year of development effort.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 Support, CSMT Enabled By Default
    After being in development for a year, Wine 4.0 is now available for download. The new stable Wine release includes important changes like support for Vulkan, Direct3D 12 and game controllers. For those that might not be familiar with it, Wine is a Windows compatibility layer for Linux that lets you run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS, and Android (experimental). Wine is used by Proton, Valve's Steam Play compatibility layer that allows playing Windows games on Linux, and by CrossOver, a commercial Microsoft Windows compatibility layer for macOS and Linux, among others.
  • Wine 4.0 is Here with Significant New Features
    Not everyone prefers to use Wine. But, if you have a favorite app/service that is not yet available for Linux, you can try Wine in order to run Windows apps or games. For those who are not aware of Wine, it’s a software that lets you run Windows-only applications and games on Linux. Want iTune on Linux, Wine is your best bet.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 and Better HiDPI
  • Wine 4.0 Officially Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 & Better HiDPI
    Wine 4.0 is now officially available as the new annual stable release to Wine for running Windows programs and games on Linux and other operating systems. Following seven weekly release candidates, Wine 4.0 was ready to ship today as judged by Wine founder Alexandre Julliard. Wine 4.0 is a big release bringing initial Vulkan graphics API support, Direct3D CSMT is enabled by default, early Direct3D 12 support via VKD3D, continued HiDPI work, various OpenGL improvements, multi-sample D3D texture support, 64-bit improvements, continued Android support, and much more... See our Wine 4.0 feature overview to learn more about this big update.
  • Just over a year after the last main release, Wine 4.0 is officially here
    You might want to grab a glass for this one, no not that dusty old thing, one of the nice ones. The ones at the back of the cupboard for special occasions! Wine 4.0 is officially here. Comparing Wine 3.0 to 4.0, naturally it's a pretty huge release. Although, most people have likely been using the development builds for some time.

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