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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa. 

    Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support. 

    KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust. 

    Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering.

    Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Graphics: XDC2021, Chromebooks, and LLVMpipe

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Talks More About Their Open-Source Vulkan Ray-Tracing Bring-Up - Phoronix

    Prominent Intel open-source Vulkan Linux driver developer Jason Ekstrand presented at today's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC2021) about their work on enabling Vulkan ray-tracing support.

    As has been covered many times already, with forthcoming Xe-HPG graphics card will feature hardware ray-tracing capabilities. While Windows users are getting excited over DirectX 12 DXR prospects with Intel graphics, on the Linux side that is obviously focused on the Vulkan ray-tracing extensions.

  • X.Org Could Use More Help Improving & Addressing Its Security - Phoronix

    Those reading Phoronix over the years likely know the X.Org Server has had an increasing number of vulnerabilities come to light in recent times and statements by security researchers like the security being even worse than it looks. Given the age of the X.Org/X11 codebase and many components being rather unmaintained these days, the security situation isn't that great combined with a lack of manpower. The security topic was under the spotlight today at the XDC2021 conference.

  • Google Is Successfully Using The Open-Source Qualcomm GL/VLK Drivers On Chromebooks - Phoronix

    It's been known that Google has been using the open-source "MSM" DRM/KMS driver on Qualcomm-powered devices that originally started out as a reverse-engineered driver project separate from the company. Now it's also been confirmed how Google is successfully using the open-source Mesa Freedreno OpenGL and TURNIP Vulkan drivers on Qualcomm-powered Chromebooks too.

  • Mesa's LLVMpipe + Lavapipe Land FP16 Support - Phoronix

    The latest work landing for Mesa 21.3 is supporting FP16 within the LLVM-based software driver code namely for the LLVMpipe Gallium3D OpenGL and Lavapipe Vulkan drivers.

    VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and VK_KHR_shader_subgroup_extended_types are now exposed for the LLVMpipe code with this OpenGL FP16 support in place. The Lavapipe Vulkan code is similarly exposing this FP16 support too.

Graphics: M1, AMD, and V3DV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Reverse Engineering, Open-Source Driver Writing Continues For Apple's M1 GPU - Phoronix

    Alyssa Rosenzweig spoke today at the virtual X.Org Developers Conference about the ongoing work for bringing up Linux display and graphics support on the Apple M1 graphics processor.

    While there has been much progress this year bringing up Linux on the Apple M1 SoC, the display/graphics bring-up is particularly involved and will likely prove to be the most challenging aspect from its reverse engineering to driver writing.

  • Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 21.Q3 Released For Linux - Phoronix

    AMD today released their quarterly update to the Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise graphics driver package, which includes an updated Linux build as well.

    Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 21.Q3 is their latest Linux driver package aiming to provide the latest driver support for their workstation GPUs/accelerators on RHEL/CentOS 7 and 8, Ubuntu 20.04.2, Ubuntu 18.04.5, and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP3.

  • AMD Publishes Initial Firmware For Yellow Carp APUs - Phoronix

    A small but important step forward is seeing AMD recently publishing their binary firmware files in advance of new GPU/APU launches for rounding out their Linux driver support stack.

    Last month AMD published the Van Gogh APU firmware files in advance of hardware like the Steam Deck shipping at large. Now this morning the Yellow Carp APU firmware files are also published well in advance of the APUs being officially launched.

  • Raspberry Pi V3DV Driver Still Working On Vulkan 1.1 Conformance, More Performance

    Iago Toral of Igalia kicked off the first day of the virtual XDC2021 developer conference today by sharing a status update on V3DV as the open-source Mesa Vulkan driver most notably used for Raspberry Pi 4 and newer.

    The current status of the V3DV driver shouldn't be too surprising to regular Phoronix readers as we frequently cover its milestones. In any case, this year V3DV has enjoyed seeing Vulkan 1.0 conformance, much of the Vulkan 1.1 extensions implemented but not yet officially conformant, better WSI platform integration, and a lot of work on enhancing the performance. V3DV is maturing greatly when it comes to the performance though the developers are still working to maximize its performance potential.

NVIDIA RTX 30 Series Resizable BAR Support Continues Helping Performance On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While NVIDIA has been supporting Resizable BAR for a while now with their GeForce RTX 30 series graphics cards, for those exclusively using Linux it remains more of a challenge due to AIB partners generally not releasing any vBIOS updates for ReBAR support that can be easily applied under Linux. But if you do carry out an update -- such as under Windows -- the performance uplift can be worthwhile if using a game that can benefit from the support.

A few months back we looked at the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Resizable BAR support on Linux. In this article is a current look at the Resizable BAR impact with several more RTX 30 series cards having an updated vBIOS and tested under Linux when enabling the Resizable BAR support for the system.

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libinput 1.19.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

libinput 1.19.0 is now available. Only three device-specific quirks since the
RC so let's call this release done, push it out and the world becomes a
slightly better, or at least different, place.

Since there's nothing too noteworthy, here's the text from the RC explaining
the new features.

This release brings two new features and the corresponding API additions: hold
gestures and high-resolution wheel scrolling (which changes the scroll APIs).

Hold gestures are a new type of gestures that are triggered by holding one or
more fingers on a touchpad without significant movement. They add to the
existing pinch and swipe gestures and allow for the implementation of
hold-to-click. Where callers implement kinetic scrolling, hold gestures can be
used to stop scrolling - since the gesture is triggered on a finger(s) down
after a scroll motion, that event can be used to stop scrolling.
Many thanks to José Expósito for the new gestures.

High-resolution wheel scrolling has been long in the making and the solution
ends up replacing the existing pointer axis API. Three new events are
available: LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_WHEEL,
LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_FINGER, and
LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_CONTINUOUS. These events **replace** the
existing LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_AXIS events, i.e. if you are processing the
new events simply discard the old events.

The FINGER and CONTINUOUS events are very similar to the previous event, the
WHEEL event supporst a new API: libinput_event_pointer_get_scroll_value_v120().
That function returns the value of a scroll movement in multiples or fractions
of 120. For example, a high-resolution scroll event that triggers 4 events
instead of just 1 per 15 degree rotation will generate 4 events with a value
of 30 each.

Many thanks to José Expósito for taking those patches and pushing them over
the line so they could be merged.

The documentation has been updated for the new APIs,
please see https://wayland.freedesktop.org/libinput/doc/latest/.

The rest of the changes is the usual mix of janitorial patches and
device-specific quirks.

As usual, the git shortlog is below.

Clayton Craft (1):
      quirks: Pine64 PineBook Pro keyboard

José Expósito (4):
      doc: add missing literal blocks in contributing
      quirks: Microsoft Surface Pro 3 Cover
      util: add a function to parse bool properties
      quirks: no button debouncing on generic emulated mouse

Peter Hutterer (1):
      libinput 1.19.0

weizhixiang (1):
      use ARRAY_FOR_EACH when traverse array

git tag: 1.19.0

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Libinput 1.19 Released With Hold Gestures & High Resolution Wheel Scrolling

Zink Is Over: This Time I’m Serious.

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Look.

I know what you’re gonna say, and maybe I did just say zink was done a week or two ago.

I’m not saying I didn’t.

But that was practically last year at the speed with which zink’s codebase moves and its developer community sits in my office eating cookies between Mesa builds, and it was also before I set off on my journey to make the rest of those zany Phoronix benchmark games run instead of crashing or whatever.

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Latest Ubuntu 21.10 blows the wind out of Windows 10 / 11 in certain performance tests

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Microsoft's next-gen Windows 11 OS is set to release publicly on the 5th of October which is about a week earlier than the release date for Ubuntu 21.10 (codenamed "Impish Indri"), the latter being on October 14. As a result, folks over at Phoronix were curious and wondered what the performances differences might be like between the two upcoming operating systems.

According to the benchmark results obtained in the comparison across several workstation applications, it seems Ubuntu 21.10 is quite a bit ahead by around 50%, or much more, in some of the tests especially those that involve more dependency on the CPU, indicating that the OS is probably better at utilizing the available CPU resources than Windows. GPU-based applications however have generally tended to favor Microsoft's OS, however, the performance gaps aren't as big in Windows' favor.

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Kernel: AMD/Radeon, Ext4 vs XFS, and Latest in inux 5.15

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Just Squeezed More Workstation Performance Out Of Its RadeonSI Driver - Phoronix

    While Vulkan is quickly taking over as the dominant graphics API for Linux gamers especially with the likes of DXVK and VKD3D-Proton mapping Direct3D atop Vulkan, OpenGL remains widely used by workstation software. It's also for workstation software where AMD's "PRO" closed-source OpenGL Linux driver has traditionally competed well (and outperformed) the open-source Mesa driver. But with all the recent changes, that's either a matter of the past or close to not being relevant with the latest Mesa enhancements.

  • Ext4 vs XFS – Which Filesystem Should You Use

    Users running a Linux system hardly pay attention to the underlying filesystem. In fact, during the installation of Linux, there’s a tendency to often go with the default filesystem listed without exploring other available options. For windows, things are a lot easier since NTFS is the dominant filesystem. With Linux, there are numerous filesystems at your disposal. These include the Ext4, XFS, ZFS, and BTRFS.

    The most widely used filesystems are Ext4 and XFS, with the latter being the default filesystem in RHEL-based distros and Ext4 being the standard filesystem in Debian and Ubuntu distributions. When choosing a filesystem some of the factors that need to be considered include scalability, stability, and data integrity.

  • Linux Kernel 5.15 Will Have Improved NTFS File System Support

    The Paragon’s NTFS driver was merged by Linux creator Linus Torvalds earlier this month, bringing reliable read and write functionality for this filesystem to the kernel.

    The last month, Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, made it known to Paragon Software that it should really submit a pull request for its read-write NTFS driver to be included in the awaited version 5.15 release, for which the merge window is still open at the time of writing this.

  • Linux 5.15 Readies More Code For Compile & Run-Time Detection Of Buffer Overflows - Phoronix

    Last week a number of patches were merged in the quest to provide the kernel with comprehensive compile-time and run-time detection of buffer overflows. Another patch series was sent out today while still for this cycle they are expected to enable the compiler warnings around array-bounds and zero-length-bounds.

    Kees Cook sent in the second batch of overflow updates for Linux 5.15. This latest batch has tree-wide changes to replace open-coded flex arrays in unions, replacing zero-element memcpy() destinations with flexible arrays, and a variety of other improvements to improve the Linux kernel's buffer overflow detection and trying to make it an issue of the past.

X.Org Server Adds "AsyncFlipSecondaries" To Deal With Crappy Multi-Monitor Experience

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

At the moment when running the X.Org Server in a multi-monitor configuration with displays of different refresh rates, it can lead to a poor experience with a variety of visual deficiencies when running an unredirected full-screen window with page-flipping for DRI3/Present. There is now a change that was merged into the X.Org Server with a new "AsyncFlipSecondaries" to improve that experience when running multiple displays of varying refresh rates.

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Graphics: Khronos Group/Vulkan News and X.Org

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The Khronos Group Is Hosting A Virtual Vulkan Event Next Month - Phoronix

    While The Khronos Group previously hosted in-person Vulkan events, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic their "Vulkanised 2021" event next month has morphed into a free virtual event.

  • X.Org DMX Dropped After More Than A Decade Of Crashes - Phoronix

    The X.Org Distributed Multihead X (DMX) DDX driver has been dropped from the X.Org Server source tree due to its rather broken state for more than one decade.

    Xdmx is for distributed multi-head X serves as a proxy server so multiple displays for a desktop can be hosted from different machines / X.Org Servers and increasingly rare to find it used. As noted last week, the DMX DDX was on the chopping block since for about fourteen years now it's been rather broken -- trying to start any OpenGL clients with it will result in a crash. Back in 2017 was a proposed fix for this crashing on OpenGL clients but even that fix didn't get picked up.

  • Vulkan 1.2.191 Released With New Extension To Make Wiser Memory Decisions - Phoronix

    Vulkan 1.2.191 is out this morning as the latest update to this graphics/compute API. As usual is a variety of bug fixes / clarifications to the specification while this time around is also one new extension.

    VK_EXT_pageable_device_local_memory is the new extension to Vulkan 1.2.191. The VK_EXT_pageable_device_local_memory extension allows for indicating to the application that the operating system supports pageable device local memory, in order for the application or game engine to make wiser decisions around memory management.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

  •     
  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3