Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Kernel: VKMS, CAKE, Xen and AMDVLK

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Virtual Kernel Mode-Setting Driver Being Added To Linux 4.19

    Linux 4.19 is shaping up to be a pretty exciting kernel release for what is expected to be the last version before Linux 5.0.

    Adding to the list of Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) improvements in Linux 4.19, VKMS has been added to Linux 4.19. The VKMS driver is the virtual kernel mode-setting effort, most recently worked on as part of this year's Google Summer of Code.

    The virtual KMS driver is a basic KMS driver exposing a CRTC/encoder/connector/plane that can be used for headless machines to run an X.Org Server or even Wayland and serves for virtual display purposes without necessa

  • Networking CAKE Is Ready For Tasting With Linux 4.19

    For those maintaining their own home-built Linux router, Linux 4.19 is going to be pretty exciting: CAKE Qdisc has been merged into net-next, making it a feature for this next kernel cycle.

  • Latest Xen Hypervisor Arrives Late, but Greatly Improved
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Now Supports Direct Display Mode For VR HMDs

    The AMDVLK open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver has seen its latest weekly code drop that brings with it some of the extensions needed for supporting the Steam VR experience.

    The AMDVLK driver now supports VK_EXT_direct_mode_display and VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extensions. These extensions are needed so a Vulkan application/compositor can take exclusive control of display(s), such as the use-case for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs) with being controlled by the SteamVR compositor. The VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension is needed for acquiring control of a display that is associated with an X11 screen from the X.Org Server.

Linux Kernel, Linux Foundation and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The final step for huge-page swapping

    For many years, Linux system administrators have gone out of their way to avoid swapping. The advent of nonvolatile memory is changing the equation, though, and swapping is starting to look interesting again — if it can perform well enough. That is not the case in current kernels, but a longstanding project to allow the swapping of transparent huge pages promises to improve that situation considerably. That work is reaching its final stage and might just enter the mainline soon.

    The use of huge pages can improve the performance of the system significantly, so the kernel works hard to make them available. The transparent huge pages mechanism collects application data into huge pages behind the scenes, and the memory-management subsystem as a whole works hard to ensure that appropriately sized pages are available. When it comes time to swap out a process's pages, though, all of that work is discarded, and a huge page is split back into hundreds of normal pages to be written out. When swapping was slow and generally avoided, that didn't matter much, but it is a bigger problem if one wants to swap to a fast device and maintain performance.

  • Revisiting the MAP_SHARED_VALIDATE hack

    One of the the most commonly repeated mistakes in system-call design is a failure to check for unknown flags wherever flags are accepted. If there is ever a point where callers can get away with setting unknown flags, then adding new flags becomes a hazardous act. In the case of mmap(), though, developers found a clever way around this problem. A recent discussion has briefly called that approach into question, though, and raised the issue of what constitutes a kernel regression. No changes are forthcoming as a result, but the discussion does provide an opportunity to look at both the specific hack and how the kernel community decides whether a change is a regression or not.

    Back in 2017, several developers were trying to figure out a way to safely allow direct user-space access to files stored on nonvolatile memory devices. The hardware allows this memory to be addressed directly by the processor, but any changes could go astray if the filesystem were to move blocks around at the same time. The solution that arose was a new mmap() flag called MAP_SYNC. When a file is mapped with this flag set (and the file is stored on a nonvolatile memory device), the kernel will take extra care to ensure that access to the mapping and filesystem-level changes will not conflict with each other. As far as applications are concerned, using this flag solves the problem.

  • Take Our Survey on Open Source Programs

    Please take eight minutes to complete this survey. The results will be shared publicly on The New Stack, and The Linux Foundation’s GitHub page.

  • Mesa 18.1.4 release candidate

    Mesa 18.1.4 is planned for release this Friday, July 13th, at or around 10 AM PDT.

  • Mesa 18.1.4 Being Prepared With Intel Fixes & A Couple For Radeon

    Another routine Mesa 18.1. point release is being prepared while waiting for the August debut of the Mesa 18.2 feature update.

    Dylan Baker, the Mesa 18.1 release manager and his first stab at the task, has announced the Mesa 18.1.4 release candidate today. In its current form, Mesa 18.1.4 is comprised of just over two dozen patches.

  • Pre-AMDGPU xf86-video-ati X.Org Driver Sees A Round Of Improvements

    It's rare in recent years to have anything to report on xf86-video-ati, the X.Org driver for the display/2D experience for pre-GCN Radeon graphics cards. But this week has been a large batch of fixes and improvements for those using this DDX driver with pre-HD7000 series hardware.

    Longtime Radeon Linux driver developer Michel Dänzer has landed a number of commits already this week of various fixes/cleanups, some of which were inspired by the xf86-video-amdgpu DDX driver that is used for current-generation hardware with the AMDGPU kernel driver (unless using xf86-video-modesetting...).

A Look At The Windows 10 vs. Linux Power Consumption On A Dell XPS 13 Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

With the current-generation Dell XPS 13 XPS9370-7002SLV currently being tested at Phoronix, one of the areas I was most anxious to benchmark was the power consumption... For years it has been a problem of Linux on laptops generally leading to less battery life than on Windows, but in the past ~2+ years there has been some nice improvements within the Linux kernel and a renewed effort by developers at Red Hat and elsewhere on improving the Linux laptop battery life. Here are some initial power consumption numbers for this Dell XPS 13 under Windows 10 and then various Linux distributions.

The Dell XPS 13.3-inch laptop for testing features the Intel Core i7 8550U (quad-core + HT) CPU with UHD Graphics 620, 2 x 4GB RAM, 256GB PM961 NVMe Samsung SSD, and its panel is a 1920 x 1080 resolution. For some initial basic tests I ran Windows 10 out-of-the-box and compared that to fresh installs of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Fedora Workstation 28, openSUSE Tumbleweed, and Clear Linux.

Read more

Graphics: AMDGPU, Radeon, Vulkan-Virgl

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 4.18 AMDGPU Tests: Vega Taking A Hit

    Being roughly mid-way through the Linux 4.18 kernel development cycle, I spent some time this weekend running benchmarks of the AMDGPU DRM driver on Linux 4.18 Git compared to Linux 4.17 stable on three different Radeon graphics cards while using the Mesa 18.1.3 based drivers.

  • Radeon ROCm 1.8.2 Compute Stack In Beta, Might Work Under Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    A new beta of the Radeon Open Compute "ROCm" stack was quietly made available for v1.8.2.

    While ROCm 1.9 will officially support Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, it looks like the ROCm 1.8.2 beta might contain preliminary Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" support. A ROCm 1.8.2 beta user has commented that he was able to get 1.8.2 working on Ubuntu 18.04 with the Linux 4.16 kernel with the AMDKFD kernel driver.

  • Vulkan-Virgl Continues Progressing For Getting Vulkan Within VMs

    One of the most exciting Google Summer of Code 2018 projects is Vulkan-Virgl for supporting this modern graphics/compute API within virtual machines.

    Vulkan-Virgl is based off the existing Virgl initiative that has been providing OpenGL hardware acceleration to guest VMs using VirtIO-GPU and paired with some Mesa code and the Virgl rendering library. The GSoC 2018 project is making Virgl work with both OpenGL and Vulkan APIs.

Linux and Graphics: Gasket, MoltenVK, RADV and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Google's Gasket Driver Framework Landing For Linux 4.19

    Queued into the staging code for introduction with the Linux 4.19 kernel is the Gasket driver framework and the first driver based upon it, Apex.

    Gasket in this context is short for Google ASIC Software, Kernel Extensions, and Tools. The Gasket framework aims to make it easier to develop thin kernel drivers that provide the basic functionality in kernel-space but any extra functionality is to be achieved in user-space code.

  • MoltenVK Gets Patches To Workaround iOS API Issue, App Store Rejection

    A new pull request has been submitted to MoltenVK, the open-source project for mapping the Vulkan graphics/compute API over Apple's Metal to run on iOS/macOS. This pull request is working to address the issue that caused at least one MoltenVK-using iPhone/iPad game to be rejected from the Apple App Store.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets Minor CPU Overhead Reductions, Conditional Rendering Patches

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's open-source Linux GPU driver team has been particularly busy in recent days with "RADV" Radeon Vulkan driver enhancements.

    Pitoiset this weekend sent out patches for enabling the new VK_KHR_create_renderpass2 extension, which was introduced in Saturday's release of Vulkan 1.1.80. RenderPass2 allows for render passes to be easily extended.

  • RADV Driver Gets Faster Shader LLVM Compilation

    It's an exciting day in RADV land as in addition to work on the new Vulkan 1.1.80 extensions, David Airlie landed a patch he's been baking for speeding up the shader compilation performance for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa.

9-Way Linux Desktop Distribution Benchmarks With The Intel Core i7 8086K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Chances are if you are spending more than $400 USD to have the Intel Core i7 8086K, the limited edition processor that is Intel's first to have a turbo frequency at 5.0GHz (and can easily overclock on all cores to 5.0+ GHz), you probably care a great deal about your system's performance. For squeezing extra performance out of the hardware, there is a wide variety of software optimizations available. Many of those software optimizations can be found within Intel's own Clear Linux distribution as previously shown while for this i7-8086K benchmarking is a look at how nine Linux distributions compare out-of-the-box when tested on this Coffeelake CPU and all CPU cores overclocked to 5.0GHz.

Read more

Scientific Linux 6.9 vs. 6.10 vs. 7.5 Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you are still running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or one of the downstreams like CentOS, Scientific Linux, or Oracle Linux, these benchmarks are for you in showing the performance of Scientific Linux 6.9 vs. 6.10 vs. 7.5 for getting an idea about the current performance of EL6/EL7.

Read more

Graphics: UHD, NVIDIA "Nouveau" and Intel ANV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • UHD Graphics 620: Slow But Who Is Slower? Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Graphics

    The latest hardware at Phoronix for testing is the Dell XPS 13.3-inch (XPS9370) with Intel Core i7-8550U Kabylake-R processor featuring UHD Graphics 620. A number of interesting Linux benchmarks are currently being worked on, including Windows versus various Linux distribution performance tests as well as power consumption, etc. For some initial figures for your viewing pleasure this weekend are some of the gaming/graphics tests between Windows 10 and Ubuntu Linux.

  • Recent Nouveau Improvements Thanks To A New Contributor

    -
    The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver continues to be largely a community affair aside from occasional code/documentation dumps (and hardware supplies) from NVIDIA and then Red Hat also employing a few of the key contributors to the Nouveau DRM kernel driver and Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D within Mesa. When it comes to Red Hat's Nouveau developers like Ben Skeggs and Karol Herbst, they started out as community contributors over the years to this driver. Fortunately, this year has brought another new contributor to the Mesa driver stack.

  • Intel ANV Driver Moves Forward With Vulkan 1.1.80 / KHR_create_renderpass2

    Released yesterday was Vulkan 1.1.80 that offers three new extensions while the Intel ANV open-source driver has begun rolling out patches for supporting this latest Vulkan specification update.

    Lead Intel ANV developer Jason Ekstrand took the opportunity over the weekend to begin sending out the v1.1.80 patches for ANV. The seven patches sent out on Saturday include the routine updating of the Vulkan headers/XML against the 1.1.80 upstream while the other work was focused on the VK_KHR_create_renderpass2 extension. KHR_create_renderpass2 is about making render passes more extensible via sub-structures at render pass creation time.

Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Xilinx ZynqMP DisplayPort DRM/KMS Driver Could Soon Be Ready For Mainline

    Back in January there were Xilinx developers who posted a DRM/KMS driver for their DisplayPort subsystem as part of the ZynqMP SoC. It looks like the driver for this display pipeline may soon be ready for mainline.

    Hyun Kwon of Xilinx posted the latest "XLNX" DRM driver patches on Sunday for their ZynqMP DP KMS code. This driver in its current form is just under six thousand lines of code.

  • Vulkan 1.1.80 Released With Conditional Render, Renderpass2, 8-Bit Storage

    VULKAN --
    After a number of recent Vulkan 1.1 point releases being rather mundane, Vulkan 1.1.80 is out this morning and on top of documentation updates also brings three notable new Vulkan extensions.

    Vulkan 1.1.80 has the usual churn within the documentation to clarify some statements and other work, but exciting us are the three new extensions: VK_EXT_conditional_render, VK_KHR_create_renderpass2, and VK_KHR_8bit_storage.

  • Wayland's Weston Picks Up Force-On, Modifiers, Aspect Ratio Handling

    The past week has seen a number of improvements to Wayland's Weston compositor with new features.

  • Apple Rejects iOS App For Using MoltenVK (Vulkan Over Metal)

    Back in February MoltenVK was open-sourced as part of The Khronos Group and Valve working harder to get Vulkan working on macOS/iOS by mapping it through to using Apple's Metal Graphics/Compute API. The most notable user of MoltenVK on macOS to date is the Vulkan Dota 2 on Mac, but for those looking to use this Vulkan-to-Metal framework on iOS, it looks like Apple might be clamping down.

    We were alerted today by an indie game studio that one of their iOS games is now rejected by Apple over its MoltenVK usage. Specifically, the game was rejected for "non-public API" usage. Apple's rejection letter cites the use of non-public interfaces around IOSurface, which is used directly by MoltenVK.

Intel Core i7 8086K Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel announced the limited edition Core i7 8086K processor in June to celebrate 40 years since the introduction of the original 8086 processor that ushered in the x86 architecture. The Core i7 8086K is now widely available albeit with an apparent limited time available. This celebratory CPU is built off Intel's existing Coffeelake CPU micro-architecture but with an elevated CPU base frequency and a turbo frequency that tops out at 5.0GHz to make it the company's highest-performing mainstream desktop CPU to date.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Ballerina reinvents cloud-native programming

Ballerina has been inspired by Java, Go, C, C++, Rust, Haskell, Kotlin, Dart, TypeScript, JavaScript, Swift, and other languages. It is an open source project, distributed under the Apache 2.0 license, and you can find its source code in the project's GitHub repository. Read more

Games: Stranded Deep, Ion Maiden and More

Android Leftovers