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Graphics/Benchmarks

A Quick Look At EXT4 vs. ZFS Performance On Ubuntu 19.10 With An NVMe SSD

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those thinking of playing with Ubuntu 19.10's new experimental ZFS desktop install option in opting for using ZFS On Linux in place of EXT4 as the root file-system, here are some quick benchmarks looking at the out-of-the-box performance of ZFS/ZoL vs. EXT4 on Ubuntu 19.10 using a common NVMe solid-state drive.

Given Canonical has brought ZFS support to its Ubiquity desktop installer as an easy-to-deploy option for running on this popular file-system, for this initial round of testing from Ubuntu 19.10 a lone NVMe SSD is being used (Corsair Force MP600) as opposed to doing any multi-disk setups, etc, where ZFS is more common due to its rich feature set.

Clean installs of Ubuntu 19.10 were done both with EXT4 and ZFS while using the stock mount options / settings each time. The ZoL support in Ubuntu 19.10 is relying upon various back-ports from ZFS On Linux 0.8.2 and this imminent Linux distribution update is shipping with a 5.3-based kernel.

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Linux Graphics Stack: Intel, AMD and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adds Bits For Jasper Lake PCH

    Details are still light on Jasper Lake, but volleyed onto the public mailing list today was the initial support for the Jasper Lake PCH within the open-source Linux graphics driver side.

    The patch adds in the Jasper Lake PCH while acknowledging it's similar to Icelake and Tigerlake behavior. The Jasper Lake PCI device ID is 0x4D80. The patch doesn't reveal any other notable details but at least enough to note that the Jasper Lake support is on the way. Given the timing, the earliest we could see Intel Jasper Lake support out in the mainline kernel would be for Linux 5.5, which will be out as stable as the first kernel series of 2020 and in time for the likes of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Fedora 32.

  • Linux Graphics Drivers Could Have User-Space API Changes More Strictly Evaluated

    In response to both the AMD Radeon and Intel graphics drivers adding new user-space APIs for user-space code that just gets "[thrown] over the wall instead of being open source developed projects" and the increase of Android drivers introducing their own UAPI headaches, Airlie is looking at enforcing more review/oversight when DRM drivers want to make user-space API changes.

    The goal ultimately is to hopefully yield more cross-driver UAPI discussions and in turn avoiding duplicated efforts, ensuring good development implementations prior to upstreaming, and better quality with more developers reviewing said changes.

  • xf86-video-ati 19.1 Released With Crash & Hang Fixes

    For those making use of xf86-video-ati on X.Org-enabled Linux desktops, the version 19.1 release brings just a handful of new fixes. This release was announced today by Michel Dänzer who last month departed AMD to now work on Red Hat's graphics team. Michel is sticking around the Mesa/X.Org world for Red Hat's duties but is hoping someone else will be picking up maintenance of the xf86-video-ati/xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers going forward. Granted, not a lot of activity happens to these X.Org DDX drivers these days considering more Linux desktops slowly moving over to Wayland, many X11 desktops using the generic xf86-video-modesetting, and these AMD drivers being fairly basic now with all of the big changes in the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver.

Windows 10 vs. Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Driver Performance With Intel Icelake Iris Plus Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With picking up the Dell XPS 7390 with Intel Core i7-1065G7 for being able to deliver timely benchmarks from Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Icelake generation, one of the first areas we have been testing is the Iris Plus "Gen 11" graphics performance. In this article are our initial Windows 10 vs. Linux graphics performance numbers for Ice Lake.

For this very first Intel Iris Plus Gen11 graphics testing are results from Windows 10 compared to Ubuntu 19.10. Ubuntu Linux was benchmarked with its stock driver stack comprised of Mesa 19.2.1 as well as opting for the "Iris" Gallium3D driver and also testing Mesa 19.3-devel both with the default i965 OpenGL driver and the Iris Gallium3D driver. Of course, for the Vulkan tests on Linux is their sole "ANV" Vulkan driver.

The Dell XPS 7390 was equipped with the Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake processor and its Iris Plus Graphics, 2 x 8GB LPDDR4 3733MHz memory, 500GB Toshiba NVMe solid-state drive, and 1920x1200 panel.

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Graphics and Standards

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Web
Legal
  • SHADERed 1.2.3 Released With Support For 3D Textures & Audio Shaders

    SHADERed is the open-source, cross-platform project for creating and testing HLSL/GLSL shaders. While a version number of 1.2.3 may not seem like a big update, some notable additions can be found within this new SHADERed release.

  • Vulkan 1.1.125 Released With SPIR-V 1.4 Support

    Succeeding Vulkan 1.1.124 one week later is now Vulkan 1.1.125 with a lone new extension.

    Vulkan 1.1.125 has its usual clarifications and corrections to this graphics API specification. Meanwhile the new extension introduced in the overnight v1.1.125 release is VK_KHR_spirv_1_4.

  • Making Movies Accessible for Everyone

    For the first time, people who are deaf or hard of hearing will be able to enjoy the Nairobi leg of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival, opening on October 15.

Graphics: Godot's Vulkan Renderer, Mutter With Wayland and Vulkan Development

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Godot's Vulkan Renderer Is Getting Into Increasingly Good Shape

    Lead developer of the open-source Godot 2D/3D game engine Juan Linietsky has continued working daily on the engine's Vulkan renderer ahead of Godot 4.0.

  • GNOME's Mutter 3.35.1 Fixes The Night Light Mode On Wayland

    With many of the prominent fixes that we've talked about for GNOME Shell and Mutter since last month's 3.34 release having been back-ported to 3.34.1, this weekend's release of GNOME Shell 3.35.1 and Mutter 3.35.1 as the first steps towards GNOME 3.36 aren't all that big. But at least in the case of this new Mutter development release are some worthwhile fixes.

    GNOME Shell 3.35.1 has just different bug fixes and clean-ups but nothing particularly special. While no big features yet, at least the useful fixes over recent weeks were back-ported to the 3.34 stable series.

  • Vulkan To Better Handle Variable Rate Displays / Adaptive-Sync In The Future

    While longtime X11 developer Keith Packard is now working for SiFive on RISC-V processors by day, he's still involved in the Linux graphics world through his contract work for Valve. At the XDC2019 conference earlier this month he presented on display timing, the current Linux plumbing for it, and also bringing up Vulkan will better support variable rate displays in the future.

    Keith for a while now has done contract work for Valve with Linux graphics infrastructure improvements around better supporting VR HMD hardware on the Linux desktop and more recently on display / refresh rate timing and ensure it works punctually.

Graphics: Red Hat, AMD and XWayland

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Red Hat's New Graphics Engineer Is A Longtime AMD/ATI Linux Developer

    Red Hat had been looking to hire another experienced open-source graphics driver developer and for that their newest member on their growing open-source graphics team is a longtime AMD/ATI developer. 

    Mentioned within the AMDGPU DDX driver update announcement from Michel Dänzer is confirmation that he left AMD and is now working for Red Hat. Michel is a longtime member of the open-source graphics community: Michel had been working at AMD since 2011 on their open-source driver stack while prior to that for five years was working for Mesa creators Tungsten Graphics and followed through when they got acquired by VMware. 

  • xf86-video-amdgpu 19.1 Delivers A Batch Of Fixes

    AMD has released a new version of their X.Org display driver. 

    With all of the magic happening in their DRM/KMS kernel driver or Mesa components (and the likes of AMDVLK and ROCm), the xf86-video-amdgpu DDX doesn't receive much attention these days just like the other X.Org drivers. Many AMD Linux users are also using the xf86-video-modesetting generic driver these days or on Wayland-based desktops, but for those on xf86-video-amdgpu there is now a v19.1 release available. At least though AMD is still pushing out new DDX releases unlike Intel's xf86-video-intel that has been in v3.0 development now for over a half-decade without a release. 

  • XWayland Lands RandR/Vidmode Emulation For Better Game Handling

    There is yet another significant improvement found for XWayland in the latest X.Org Server code that will hopefully see a long overdue release soon. 

    The work by Red Hat's Hans de Goede on XWayland RandR and Vidmode resolution change emulation has been merged. This emulated support doesn't change the actual resolution but rather a fullscreen window at the desired resolution and use that to fill the display output. 

Graphics: X.Org Server and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server To See New CI-Driven Automated Release Cycles, Big Version Numbers

    There hasn't been a major release of the X.Org Server now in 17 months... Not because there haven't been any changes (in fact, a lot of GLAMOR and XWayland work among other fixing) but because no one has stepped up as release manager to get the next version out the door. But to workaround that, developers are looking at moving the X.Org Server to purely time-based releases and letting their continuous integration testing be the deciding factor on if a release is ready to ship.

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat proposed at last week's XDC2019 the idea of having these new, effectively automated X.Org Server releases. The xorg-server releases would get back on to their six-month release cadence and be largely autonomous with sticking to the release timeframe and just ensuring the testing gets done by way of their CI system to ensure the X.Org Server is in good shape for releasing.

  • Tons Of The Intel Tiger Lake "Gen 12" Graphics Compiler Code Just Landed In Mesa 19.3

    A lot of the Tiger Lake "Gen 12" graphics compiler infrastructure changes to Mesa for Intel's open-source OpenGL and Vulkan Linux drivers were just merged into the Mesa 19.3 code-base.

    These compiler changes have been public and under review for several weeks now but have just been merged to Mesa 19.3-devel this Friday afternoon. The changes for Tigerlake/Gen12 represent the biggest changes to Intel's graphics ISA going back to the original i965. As explained last month,
    nearly every instruction field, opcode, and register type is updated and the hardware register scoreboard logic has been punted into software with now leaving it up to the compiler now for ensuring data coherency between register reads/writes and a new sync hardware instruction.

  • Raspberry Pi 4's V3D Mesa Driver Nearing OpenGL ES 3.1

    Back during the summer Eric Anholt who had been the lead developer of Broadcom's VC4/V3D graphics driver stack most notably used by Raspberry Pi boards left the company to join Google. In his place, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is working with consulting firm Igalia to continue work on the DRM/KMS kernel driver and Gallium3D drivers for this open-source graphics driver support.

    Igalia has been working recently on V3D shader compiler improvements with implementing more pieces of NIR as well as addressing test case failures / bugs. One of the areas they have been working on a lot is OpenGL transform feedback.

Graphics: AMD, Mir and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Deep Dive Into The Performance-Focused AMDGPU "Bulk Moves" Functionality

    Recently on Phoronix you have likely heard a lot about the LRU "bulk moves" functionality for the AMDGPU driver after it was talked up by a Valve Linux developer for the performance help to Linux games and then the change landing in Linux 5.4 as a "fix".

    Huang Rui was the developer involved at AMD leading the charge on this bulk moving mechanism and he presented at last week's X.Org Developer's Conference on the topic. He mentioned how it came about when they were looking at the performance of the F1 2017 game's benchmark and ultimately seeing a need to redesign their kernel driver's buffer migration code.

  • AMD Linux Driver Bringing BACO Support To Older Sea Islands / Volcanic Islands GPUs

    It's fairly rare these days seeing big patch sets out of AMD focused on improving the open-source Linux driver support for the likes of aging GPUs such as the Sea Islands and Volcanic Islands generations, but this Friday there is some notable development activity.

    Sea Islands as a reminder is the original Radeon R7/R9 200 series and wound up in other graphics cards as well. Volcanic Islands made up the Radeon Rx 300 series as well as the R9 Nano/Fury graphics cards. A set of 15 patches posted today provide "BACO" support for these Sea and Volcanic Islands GPUs.

  • Mir 1.5 Released With Bug Fixes & Wayland Improvements

    Mir 1.5 was released today and has an updated shared memory implementation to work in confined Snaps without the Mir interface and on older Linux kernels. Mir 1.5 also has MirAL abstraction layer updates to support clipping windows to a specified area, support for Mir-based servers to setup environment variables for launching clients, fixes for Arch Linux support, logging of EGL/GL extensions available, supporting XDG-Output v3, and fixing many different bugs.

  • Mesa's DRM Library Looking To Change Its Versioning Scheme

    As it stands now, new libdrm releases have been 2.4.xx for many years with no real meaning. The proposal is to now use a format like Mesa for YEAR.N.0 or perhaps YEAR.MONTH.0 or even YEAR.MONTH.DAY. At least any of those formats would be more meaningful than the current 2.4 versioning scheme and provide users/developers with some easy guidance over the age of a given libdrm release.

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 19.10 vs. Clear Linux vs. Debian 10.1 Benchmarks On An Intel Core i9

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week I provided some fresh Windows vs. Linux web browser benchmarks for both Firefox and Chrome. For those curious how the current Windows 10 vs. Linux performance is for other workloads, here is a fresh look across a variety of software applications and while testing the near-final Ubuntu 19.10, Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux, and Debian 10.1 while running off an Intel Core i9 HEDT platform.

Ahead of all our autumn 2019 Linux distribution update benchmarks, this article is a fresh look at the Microsoft Windows 10 Pro x64 performance compared to these popular Linux distributions. Particularly with Debian 10 and Clear Linux, they tend to be the fastest Linux distributions we routinely benchmark at Phoronix while Ubuntu is included due to its popularity.

These four operating systems were all tested on the same Intel Core i9 7980XE + 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 memory + NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X + Samsung 970 EVO 500GB NVMe SSD system with the i9-7980XE being the newest Intel HEDT platform I have available for testing at the moment.

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Graphics Stack: FFmpeg+GPUs, Mesa 19.3

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Adds GPU-Accelerated Memory Copy Support To FFmpeg

    Intel engineers have contributed GPU-accelerated memory copy support to FFmpeg when making use of their preferred video decode implementation.

    For those making use of Intel Quick Sync Video decode with FFmpeg, the latest development code has added GPU-accelerated memory copy support between the video and system memory.

  • Intel ANV & Radeon RADV Vulkan Drivers Tacking On More Extensions With Mesa 19.3

    There still is another month until the feature freeze for Mesa 19.3 to end out 2019 and it will be a big one.

    In addition to the continued flurry of OpenGL driver activity and bits like Zink potentially being merged, the Intel and AMD Radeon Vulkan drivers have been seeing more extension work for 19.3-devel. Here's the latest.

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