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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 10.4.4 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While all exciting work going into Mesa Git is for Mesa 10.5, Mesa 10.4.4 is out for stable users sticking to tagged releases. Mesa 10.4.4 fixes just a handful of bugs rangingg from core Mesa to the i965 driver and DRI3.

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X.Org Server 1.17 Officially Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Keith Packard took a break from his new job at Hewlett Packard working on Linux support for "The Machine" to put out the official release of X.Org Server 1.17.

X.Org Server 1.17.0 was released a few minutes ago and is codenamed Côte de veau. This is a half-year update to the X.Org Server and features integration of the xf86-video-modesetting DDX driver, much improved GLAMOR support, and other improvements.

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Wayland's Weston Now Supports Maximizing XWayland Windows

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A change accepted into Wayland's Weston compositor codebase on Monday allows for maximizing XWayland windows.

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Ubuntu vs. Fedora vs. openSUSE With An Intel Broadwell Ultrabook

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The latest Linux benchmarks I have to share from the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon with Intel Broadwell processor are some openSUSE Tumbleweed tests with the results compared to Fedora 21 and Ubuntu 14.10/15.04.

One of the requested test distributions for the third-generation X1 Carbon from Phoronix readers was to see how this new, high-end ultrabook would play with openSUSE. The short story is that with openSUSE Tumblewed the level of support matched that of Fedora 21 and Ubuntu 14.10/15.04 -- it's not much of a surprise really given that Tumbleweed is using the Linux 3.18 kernel, Mesa 10.4.2, etc.

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Ubuntu vs. Fedora Linux On Lenovo's X1 Carbon With Core i7 Broadwell

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat
Ubuntu

The latest distribution I tried on the X1 Carbon (and the OS I'll ultimately use for running the X1 Carbon in a production capacity as my main system) is Fedora 21. Fedora 21 booted up on the X1 Carbon wonderfully without any issues aside from the trackpoint button clicks being wonky (though the button clicks in the corner of the trackpad works fine). Fedora 21 with Wayland also ran fine on this system with Intel HD Graphics 5500. Overall, it was a pleasant experience without any major problems.

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Intel Broadwell: GCC 4.9 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 Compiler Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

GCC 4.9.2 and LLVM Clang 3.5.0 were benchmarked using the packages provided on Fedora 21 x86_64. The same Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon was used for all of the benchmarks, the first Broadwell laptop/ultrabook at Phoronix and it features the Core i7 5600U that's dual-core with Hyper Threading and tops out at 3.20GHz. Fedora 21 was running with the Linux 3.17.8 kernel while testing each of the provided compilers.

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Good Guy NVIDIA Releases New Linux Legacy Driver for Users with Old Cards

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

NVIDIA has released a new branch of Legacy drivers for the Linux platform and they are the most advanced versions you can get right now for old video cards.

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NVIDIA's Latest Maxwell Line-Up Against AMD With Catalyst On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Last week NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 960, a great $200 GPU for Linux gamers that is based on their new power-efficient Maxwell architecture. On launch-day I delivered some initial performance figures of the full GeForce GTX 900 series line-up along with other graphics cards and following that I did many new NVIDIA Linux GPU tests going back to the GeForce GTX 400 (Fermi) series. Not part of those tests were any AMD Radeon graphics cards while in this article are such numbers in making a new 18-way graphics card comparison with the latest Linux graphics drivers.

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Nouveau In Linux 3.20 Will Have A Lot Of Code Cleaning

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

While the Nouveau pull request has yet to be issued for the DRM-Next merge window that will ultimately target the Linux 3.20 kernel, a look at the changes so far appear to mostly indicate this open-source NVIDIA driver is just going through a period of code cleaning and reorganization.

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Also: Linux kernels for a macbook pro retina

AMD FX-8320E Performance On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Back in September AMD announced new FX CPUs that included the FX-8370, FX-8370E, and FX-8320E. Back then we reviewed the FX-8370/FX-8370E CPUs under Linux but at the time didn't have our hands on the more affordable FX-8320E processor. In December AMD sent over the FX-8320E and so for the past few weeks I've been happily using this new Vishera CPU.

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More in Tux Machines

How Linux Makes Your Life Easier

There is a popular myth that Linux is complicated and hard to use by a non-techie. While there are distros and advanced Linux functionality that do require tech skills, this doesn’t mean Linux is hard to use. On the contrary, there are lots of things in the philosophy and functionality of Linux that make a user’s life easier. Read more

Containers: IBM, Yan Vugenfirer and HPC

  • IBM attempts to graft virtual machine security onto container flexibility
    IBM researchers have developed a new flavor of software container in an effort to create code that's more secure than Docker and similar shared kernel container systems. Docker and its ilk are considered less secure than VMs because the compromise of a shared kernel puts all associated containers at risk. With VMs, the kernel is separate from the host kernel, which reduces the risk of collateral damage.
  • Using Linux Containers to Manage Embedded Build Environments
    Linux container technology has been proposed by companies like Resin.io as a simpler and more secure way to deploy embedded devices. And, Daynix Computing has developed an open source framework called Rebuild that uses Linux containers in the build management process of embedded IoT development. At the 2017 Open Source Summit, Daynix “virtualization expert” Yan Vugenfirer gave a presentation on Rebuild called “How Linux Containers can Help to Manage Development Environments for IoT and Embedded Systems.” Vugenfirer started by reminding the audience of the frustrations of embedded development, especially when working with large, complex projects. “You’re dealing with different toolchains, SDKs, and compilers all with different dependencies,” he said. “It gets more complicated if you need to update packages, or change SDKs, or run a codebase over several devices. The code may compile on your machine, but there may be problems in the build server or in the CI (continuous integration) server.”
  • Building Containers with HPC Container Maker
    Containers package entire workflows, including software, libraries, and even data, into a single file. The container can then be run on any compatible hardware that can run the container type, regardless of the underlying operating system. Containers are finding increased utility in the worlds of scientific computing, deep learning, HPC, machine learning, and artificial intelligence, because they are reproducible, portable (mobility of compute), user friendly (admins don’t have to install everything), and simple, and they isolate resources, reduce complexity (reduction in dependencies), and make it easy to distribute the application and dependencies. Using containers, you have virtually everything you need in a single file, including a base operating system (OS), the application or workflow (multiple applications), and all of the dependencies. Sometimes the data is also included in the container, although it is not strictly necessary because you can mount filesystems with the data from the container.

NetBSD 8.0 Ready For Release With Spectre/Meltdown Fix, Initial USB 3.0 Support

The long overdue NetBSD 8.0 operating system update appears ready now to ship. The NetBSD 8.0 release images surfaced the other day on their FTP mirrors. However, as of writing no formal NetBSD 8.0.0 release announcement has yet to be issued. Read more

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.