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Graphics/Benchmarks

Wayland & Weston 1.5 Officially Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Fluxbox

Wayland 1.5 features a new internal event queue for Wayland display events, which allows for the client library to dispatch delete and error events immediately. On the build front, Wayland now uses non-recursive Makefiles.

As usual, the Weston compositor changes tend to be more interesting these days and includes more work on XDG-Shell, the Weston input stack is now split out into libinput, there's support for the new XWayland Server to be found in this summer's release of X.Org Server 1.16, the full-screen shell was added, an animate window closing event, support for different color depths on different outputs, and other changes.

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NVIDIA Pushes Down The 331.79 Linux Driver With Bug-Fixes

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The NVIDIA 331.79 Linux driver was just announced by NVIDIA's Aaron Plattner and it includes fixes for: a crash with the nvidia-installer, a module signing issue with the NVIDIA Unified Memory kernel module, a blank screen/flickering issue when rotating displays with Base Mosaic, a bug that caused errors for big-endian X11 clients with certain RandR requests, a bug that corrupted certain software rendering, and a bug that caused issues with EDID version 1.3 or older for systems using DisplayPort in certain configurations.

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6-Way Desktop Comparison On Linux Mint 17

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

There's been many requests to run some new OpenGL and 2D performance benchmarks under different Linux desktop environments. With the imminent release of Linux Mint 17 and it shipping the latest version of the increasingly-popular Cinnamon Desktop Environment, here's a six-way desktop performance comparison using Intel graphics on Linux Mint 17.

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AST DRM Display Driver Updated For Linux 3.16

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The AST DRM driver has seen a few improvements with code that's landed today in drm-next for ultimately making it into the Linux 3.16 kernel.

The ASpeed Technologies DRM driver (AST) just features basic display support for some chips commonly found in servers. The improvements that will land for the next kernel cycle include.

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AMD Radeon R9 290 On Ubuntu 14.04 With Catalyst Can Beat Windows 8.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

The latest Linux graphics testing under the microscope at Phoronix is comparing the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS vs. Windows 8.1 performance with all available updates. Results from Intel, NVIDIA, and AMD hardware is coming up next week while today is a bit of a preview of the AMD numbers when using a Radeon R9 290 "Hawaii" graphics card. While the open-source AMD Hawaii support remains broken, with the Catalyst 14.4 driver on each operating system, the Linux Catalyst driver with the R9 290 graphics card can outperform Windows 8.1 Pro with some OpenGL games and benchmarks.

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ACPI CPUfreq vs. Intel P-State Scaling With Linux 3.15

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

For this weekend's Linux benchmarks we are looking at the performance of the Intel P-State and ACPI cpufreq drivers and comparing their scaling governor options when testing from an Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition system running with the Linux 3.15 development kernel.

Given that there's been renewed concerns recently about Intel's P-State driver causing odd performance problems and other performance issues related to the scaling governor, from the Linux 3.15 kernel this week I did some fresh tests of using both the intel_pstate and acpi_cpufreq drivers while also trying out their various scaling governor choices: performance, powersave, ondemand, conservative.

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Intel Lines Up More Graphics Changes For Linux 3.16

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

We're still a few weeks away from the release of the Linux 3.15 kernel but open-source Intel developers have already sent in another drm-next pull request to land more of their kernel graphics driver changes for Linux 3.16.

Intel already sent in their initial intel-drm-next code for Linux 3.16 at the end of April and it included initial Intel Cherryview support, improvements to Intel Broadwell support, run-time power management for Broadwell and Sandy Bridge, Gen7 command parser work, and a lot more.

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Catalyst 14.4 Has Advantages Over Linux 3.15 + Mesa 10.3 Git

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

After earlier this week doing an Intel vs. Radeon vs. Nouveau comparison using the very latest open-source Linux graphics driver code in the form of Mesa 10.3-devel and the Linux 3.15 kernel, here's benchmark results comparing the updated open-source AMD Radeon performance on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS against the Catalyst 14.4 Linux graphics driver.

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GCC vs. LLVM Clang On NVIDIA's Tegra K1 Quad-Core Cortex-A15

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Recently I posted new benchmarks showing LLVM's Clang compiler performing well against GCC from AMD's x86-based Athlon APUs with the performance of the resulting binaries being quite fast but not without some blemishes for both of these open-source compilers. In seeing how the compiler race is doing in the ARM space with many ARM vendors taking interest in LLVM/Clang, here's some fresh benchmarks of both compilers on NVIDIA's Tegra K1 SoC found by the Jetson TK1 development board.

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Nouveau Lands Maxwell GPU Support In Mesa Gallium3D

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The open-source, reverse-engineered Nouveau driver has landed initial support for NVIDIA Maxwell graphics processors within its Mesa Gallium3D Linux graphics driver.

Landing within the Linux 3.15 kernel is initial NVIDIA Maxwell support from the kernel-side with Nouveau's Direct Rendering Manager. That support is still a first-stab at the support for this hardware that first began appearing in February in the form of the GeForce GTX 750 series. That Nouveau DRM code update for Maxwell is enough to light up the Maxwell GPUs with kernel-based mode-setting, but acceleration support is currently dependent upon the binary driver's microcode/firmware for proper hardware initialization.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: Most In-Demand Programming Languages and More

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    Most of the fields in the tech industry demand a regular learning from you as they are dynamic in nature. You need to be up-to-date with the latest trends and make sure that your skillset matches the needs of your target industry. For developers, this change becomes even more necessary. For example, today’s mobile app developers need to eventually make a shift from Java and Objective-C to Kotlin and Swift, respectively. This growing adoption and demand is reflected clearly in different lists of the popular programming languages. [...] Coding Dojo analyzed the data from job listing website Indeed.com. This job posting data revolved around twenty-five programming languages, frameworks, and stacks. It’s worthing noting that some most loved programming languages like Ruby and Swift didn’t make the cut as their demand was lower as compared to other biggies. The other growing languages that didn’t make the cut were R and Rust.
  • The proof is in the pudding
    I wrote these when I woke up one night and had trouble getting back to sleep, and spent a while in a very philosophical mood thinking about life, success, and productivity as a programmer.
  • littler 0.3.3
    The fourth release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later. littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. In my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. Last but not least it is also less silly than Rscript and always loads the methods package avoiding those bizarro bugs between code running in R itself and a scripting front-end.

Games: Project 5: Sightseer, 'Jupiter Hell', Dimension Drive, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes, Counter-Strike

Liberated Linux Drivers Help AMD 'Transparency'

  • AMD Navi spotted in Linux drivers
    The architecture name is hidden under SUPER_SECRET codename. Normally we would be seeing the real name of the GPU, but AMD is likely trying to avoid generating hype for architecture which is still months away (I heard something about late 2018), hence the secret.
  • AMD’s next-gen GPU has been spotted in Linux drivers
    With AMD’s RX Vega now out and about, it is time to start looking towards the future. We’ve known for some time that Vega will be followed up by ‘Navi’ at some point between 2018 and 2020. Now, we know that progress is being made as AMD’s next-gen GPU has appeared in a new driver.
  • AMD's Next Gen Navi GPU Architecture Found Referenced In Linux Drivers
    This has been a big year for AMD, there is no doubt about that. Having launched a new CPU and GPU architectures (Zen and Vega, respectively), the company thrust itself back into relevancy in the high-end market, whereas previously the top shelf was the exclusive domain of rival Intel. So, what's next? On the GPU side, AMD is expected to roll out its Navi architecture sometime next year, with references to its next generation GPU already showing up in driver code.
  • AMD 7nm “Super Secret” Navi GPU Spotted In Driver, 2H 2018 Launch Expected
    AMD’s upcoming next generation 7nm based graphics architecture code named “Navi” has been spotted in Linux driver code. The all new GPU architecture is officially slated to debut next year, with all whispers indicating a debut in the latter half of the year.

ScummVM 2.0

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    ScummVM 2.0 has been released as a major update to this open-source game engine recreation project. ScummVM has advanced well past just supporting the original LucasArts adventure games and with today's v2.0 rollout supports "23 brand new old games", including many older Sierra adventure titles. Among the games that can now be played atop ScummVM 2.0 are Police Quest 4, Lighthouse, Leisure Suit Larry 6/7, King's Quest VII, Full Pipe, and many other titles.
  • ScummVM 2.0.
    Just in time for the holidays, the final release of ScummVM 2.0 is here! This version adds support for 23 brand new old games, including almost all of the 32-bit Sierra adventures...
  • ScummVM 2.0 released adding support for more classic games
    For those who enjoy the classics, you might want to check out the latest release of ScummVM which adds support for more classic titles. When it comes to the games, they've added support for 23 more titles like King's Quest VII, King's Questions, Leisure Suit Larry 6 (hi-res), Leisure Suit Larry 7, Riven: The Sequel to Myst and more. It's a rather impressive list, but of course the 2.0 release doesn't stop at adding support for more titles.