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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: X.Org Server 1.19.4 and RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS, openSUSE, Debian, Clear & Antergos Linux Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

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Graphics/Benchmarks

I've just wrapped up trying out nine different Linux distributions on AMD's EPYC in the form of the EPYC 7601 housed in the TYAN Transport SX TN70A-B8026. Like our initial testing with Ubuntu on EPYC, the other modern Linux distributions all played nicely with AMD's re-entry into the server market with their Zen-based offerings. But as with any new CPU platform, the out-of-the-box performance can vary greatly depending upon the Linux operating system being used. Here are benchmarks including Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS, openSUSE, Debian, Clear Linux and Antergos.

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Some Fresh Intel Core, AMD Ryzen Benchmarks On Ubuntu 17.10 + Linux 4.13

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wanting to see some fresh Linux CPU benchmarks with various AMD Ryzen and Intel Core processors, here are some benchmarks with Ubuntu 17.10 paired with its Linux 4.13 kernel build.

I've been working on some tests as part of a larger comparison for our upcoming Intel Coffeelake benchmarks. For those just wanting to see how various Intel/AMD CPUs are running on Ubuntu 17.10, here are those numbers. This is also with the latest BIOS on all of the motherboards, including the most updated AGESA code, for those interested in the evolving Ryzen performance.

More benchmarks and more CPU tests coming up shortly on Phoronix in our Coffeelake reviews, so just take this as a teaser or however you wish.

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Also: Considering AMD desktop card

Games and Graphics: Warhammer 40,000, Polaris, NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

How Ubuntu Laptop Performance Has Evolved Over Three Years From 14.10 To 17.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With the upcoming release of Ubuntu 17.10, I was curious to see how its performance compares to that of the three-year-old Ubuntu 14.10. Here are some benchmark results showing how an Intel ultrabook/laptop performance has evolved on Linux during that time.

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Graphics: Gallium3D, OpenGL, S3TC and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 17.2.2 and S3TC Support in Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 17.2.2

    Mesa 17.2.2 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    In build and integration system, we add a dependency on libunwind when running make distcheck, as this is optional for libgallium but we want to catch any problem. As consequence, also force LLVM 3.3 in Travis when building Gallium ST Other, as this is the minimum required version we want to test. On the other hand, we link libmesautil into u_atomic_test, as this is required by platforms without particular atomic operations. In this sense, there's a patch to implement __sync_val_compare_and_swap_8, required by 32-bit PowerPC platforms. Finally, there is also a fix to build in armel devices.

  • Mesa 17.2.2 Released

    As expected, Mesa 17.2.2 was released today by Igalia's Juan Suarez Romero.

  • S3TC Support Will Land In Mesa Now That The Patent Has Expired

    As mentioned last week, the S3TC patent has now expired. With the S3 Texture Compression no longer encumbered by a patent, support for it is being added to mainline Mesa.

Our Last Time Benchmarking Ubuntu 32-bit vs. 64-bit

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Over the years we have looked at the 32-bit vs. 64-bit x86 Linux performance for curiosity sake, showing how x86_64 can be much faster than i686, and just providing these values for a reference look and if for some reason are still running 32-bit Linux software including the OS while the hardware is 64-bit capable. For this final benchmarking look are fresh numbers when doing a clean install of Ubuntu 17.10 32-bit compared to Ubuntu 17.10 64-bit.

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Graphics: Radeon, Intel, Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux/Graphics: Extended Support, NVIDIA, and X.Org XDC2018

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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