Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

A Look At The HAMMER2 File-System Performance With DragonFlyBSD 5.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With this week's release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 this popular BSD operating system is promoting its own HAMMER2 file-system as stable. As a result, here are a few fresh benchmarks of HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 while more tests are forthcoming.

HAMMER2 received many improvements during the DragonFlyBSD 5.2 development cycle to the point where they now recommend HAMMER2 as the default root file-system for non-clustered systems; the clustered mode for HAMMER2 is yet to be implemented.

On Phoronix we have been covering the HAMMER2 file-system since its inception back in 2012 and have been benchmarking it more recently since it became a fairly viable choice in DragonFlyBSD 5.0. HAMMER2 is a clean sheet design and supports online deduplication, snapshots, LZ4/Zlib compression, encryption, and other features. Our tests have been positive and in the testing of DragonFlyBSD 5.0 and 5.2 we have yet to lose any data to this file-system led by DragonFly lead developer Matthew Dillon.

Read more

Graphics: "VideoCore V" GPU and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • There's Finally A Device Using Broadcom's VideoCore V GPU

    The past year we have been covering the development of the VC5 open-source Linux graphics driver stack for Broadcom's unreleased "VideoCore V" GPU, succeeding the VideoCore IV GPU most notably found on Raspberry Pi boards. Disappointing readers though has been the lack of availability for VC5 hardware, but that's beginning to change.

  • NVIDIA Publishes Reference Documentation For Volta's Display Hardware

    NVIDIA has today released the display hardware documentation for "GV100" Volta graphics hardware.

    Before getting too excited, this is strictly about the display hardware and not about the 3D engine, etc. And by "documentation", it's about 6,000 line header file of the registers for the Volta display hardware.

DRM Drivers Get Fixes Ahead Of Linux 4.17-rc1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Following the big DRM pull request that was honored last week, David Airlie decided to send in a pre-RC1 pull request of various outstanding bug fixes against these Direct Rendering Manager drivers.

While normally it's after RC1 when the bug fixes for DRM begin flowing in, a lot had already been accumulated and so their first "fixes" pull of the DRM drivers for 4.17 has now been sent over to Linus Torvalds. A lot of the fixes affect the AMDGPU DRM driver. The AMDGPU fixes include addressing the new Vega 12 support, an HDMI audio regression, DC display code fixes now that it's enabled on all supported GPUs, and various other fixes.

Read more

Also: TRIM Support Is Closer To Being Merged For ZFS On Linux

Benchmarking Amazon Linux 2 LTS Candidate 2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Back in December Amazon rolled out Amazon Linux 2 as a big upgrade to its Linux distribution intended for the EC2 compute cloud as well as on-site via VMware/VirtualBox/Hyper-V virtualization. Amazon Linux 2 rolled out an upgraded Linux kernel, compiler, and many other packages as well as switched to using systemd. Coming out this week was Amazon Linux 2 Candidate 2 as the next installment of this long-term support Linux platform.

Read more

Graphics: AMDVLK's XGL Vulkan API, Vulkan On GitHub, Mesa 17.3.9, Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDVLK's XGL Code Updated With Int16 & Shader Ballot Improvements

    AMD's XGL Vulkan API layer for their "AMDVLK" driver has been updated this week with a number of enhancements.

    The latest code drop for this AMDVLK XGL code includes supporting 16-bit integers "int16" within the AMD_shader_ballot and AMD_trinary_minmax extensions. There are also pipeline improvements, AMD_shader_ballot extension enhancements, a consistent dispatch table mechanism is now used throughout the driver, and a number of other code fixes.

  • There Are Now More Than 2,000 Projects Referencing Vulkan On GitHub

    As another milestone for the Vulkan API, as of today there are more than 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub!

    It was nearly one year ago to the day (19 April) that Vulkan had 1,000 project mentions on GitHub while overnight that threshold crossed 2,000.

    Granted, the GitHub search isn't looking at projects necessarily offering a full Vulkan code implementation, but could be a Vulkan mention within code documentation saying it's coming soon, etc. But for comparison, "Direct3D 12" has just 39 hits on GitHub (or 101 for D3D12), 207 for D3D11 / 99 for Direct 3D 11, or 33,741 for OpenGL. Overall, not bad for Vulkan's continued rise and this graphics/compute API just over two years old.

  • Mesa 17.3.9 Is Coming With About Two Dozen Fixes To End Out Mesa 17.3

    Mesa 17.3.9 is expected to be released at the start of next week as the final point release for the Mesa 17.3 driver series that was introduced back in Q4'2017.

    With Mesa 18.0 now in good shape and being out for a few weeks, the Mesa 17.3 series is wrapping up. Juan Suarez Romero of Igalia who has been serving as the 17.3 series stable release manager today announced the 17.3.9 release candidate. There are currently 23 patches for this final point release, including fixes for the RADV Vulkan driver, GL/GLES version overriding fixes, GLSL patches, NIR fixes, and other minor work.

  • Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

    The latest libinput hackery being worked on by Linux input expert Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is custom profile support for pointer acceleration.

Graphics: AMD, Wayland and Khronos Group

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Spins The Radeon RX 500X Series For Laptops/Desktops

    ollowing rumors the past few days, AMD officially confirmed the Radeon RX 500X series today for desktops and notebooks, but these effectively are just re-branded GPUs for OEM builders.

  • Wayland Gets A Meson Build System Port

    Following this week's Wayland 1.15 launch, there are now patches on the floating list to add Meson build system support to Wayland-Protocols.

    For complementing Wayland' Autotools build system, longtime GNOME developer Emmanuele Bassi is proposing Meson support for Wayland, beginning with Wayland-Protocols.

  • Khronos Officially Announces Its LLVM/SPIR-V Translator

    The Khronos Group has officially announced the long-awaited open-source availability of their SPIRV-LLVM-Translator that allows the bi-directional translation of SPIR-V and LLVM IR.

NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Benchmarks, Testing Their New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday NVIDIA released their first 396 Linux driver beta in the form of the 396.18 release and its biggest addition is a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to replace the compiler that's been hobbled together since the Vulkan 1.0 debut. Here are some fresh NVIDIA Vulkan Linux benchmarks and more on this new SPIR-V compiler.

Read more

Graphics: Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver, X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver

    Igalia developers have been working on shaderInt16 support Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver to provide 16-bit integer support.

    The consulting firm Igalia has been tasked with getting the 16-bit integer support in Vulkan shaders ready for the Intel Vulkan Linux driver. This 16-bit int support is available for "Gen8" Broadwell graphics hardware and newer.

  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.19.99.904
  • X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, EGLStreams For XWayland Might Still Land

    On Tuesday a new X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate was issued by Red Hat's Adam Jackson for this prolonged development cycle now stretching well more than one and a half years.

    This latest X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate has around three dozen fixes, mostly involving Direct Rendering Infrastructure 3 (DRI3) and GLAMOR 2D acceleration.

  • AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

    With the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel there is the long-awaited discrete GPU support in good shape at least for hardware like Polaris and Fiji. While the latest and greatest AMD GPUs are the Vega family, more work has been needed for AMDKFD support. Unfortunately those Vega changes didn't make it in for Linux 4.17, but those patches are now available.

Graphics: DRM and NVIDIA 396.18 (Blob) Beta

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Finally A Discussion Is Back Concerning FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR DRM Support

    While AMD has plumbed in FreeSync variable-rate refresh support with their AMDGPU DC display code stack, it's not yet all happy on the open-source mainline kernel as the missing piece has been over having a unified API for the Direct Rendering Manager drivers that can be used for supporting Free-Sync or the VESA-approved AdaptiveSync or HDMI VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). The discussion over having this common API for DRM drivers is back to being discussed.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Driver Reaches Beta With New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

    NVIDIA has rolled out an exciting beta Linux driver today, the first in their upcoming 396 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 396.18 Linux beta driver is now available and it's quite exciting. Exciting me the most with the NVIDIA 396 driver series is the introduction of a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. The goal of this new compiler is to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. This new SPIR-V compiler is enabled by default but for now the old compiler is still around and can be toggled with the __GL_NextGenCompiler= environment variable.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 beta driver is out with a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to reduce shader compilation time

    The new NVIDIA 396.18 beta is officially out and it's one of the more interesting driver releases from NVIDIA.

    The biggest thing included in the driver, is the brand new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. NVIDIA say this will help to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. Their older compiler will be removed in a future driver version, but if you have issues with the new one which is on by default, you can use the "__GL_NextGenCompiler=" (0 or 1) environment variable to disable it.

Mesa: NIR Compile Times and Broadcom VC5 Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NIR Compile Times Are Being Lowered Thanks To Latest Mesa Patches

    The latest driver optimization work by Timothy Arceri on Valve's Linux GPU driver team has been working on function inlining within NIR rather than within the GLSL IR optimizations. The net result is faster NIR compile times that benefit the Intel OpenGL driver and also help with RadeonSI Gallium3D.

    Arceri has been working to improve the compile times for NIR since right now with RadeonSI the compile times are slower than using the TGSI code-path. This latest patch series is a step in the right direction and it also happens to help the i965 NIR performance too.

  • Broadcom VC5 Driver Making Good Progress With Using AMDGPU's DRM Scheduler

    Last month I wrote about Broadcom's Eric Anholt exploring the use of AMDGPU's DRM scheduler within the in-development Video Core V (VC5) DRM driver. That work has panned out and looks like it will eventually work out for this open-source Broadcom graphics driver.

    Eric Anholt has spent the past two weeks wiring up the AMDGPU DRM scheduler now known as DRM_SCHED to the driver, similar to Etnaviv also now using this scheduler code that provides a serial run queue to each client and also easier support for some new features.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

5 top Blender video tutorials for beginners

Blender is a complex piece of software that is capable of producing extremely high-quality visuals for all manner of visual art purposes, from video games to product visualization. Of course, that power needs to be wielded by a controlled hand. Otherwise, you'll end up with a mush of digital geometry that makes no sense at all. These days, video tutorials are the educational tool of choice for most people. I'm going to give you five of the best free beginner video tutorials for Blender currently available. I recommend you watch all of them. They all cover a lot of the same information. However, every instructor has a different way of presenting. Stick with the one that clicks with you. Read more

Cinnamon 3.8 Desktop Environment Released with Python 3 Support, Improvements

Scheduled to ship with the upcoming Linux Mint 19 "Tara" operating system series this summer, the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment is now available for download and it's a major release that brings numerous improvements, new features, and lots of Python 3 ports for a bunch of components. Among the components that got ported to Python 3 in the Cinnamon 3.8 release, we can mention cinnamon-settings, cinnamon-menu-editor, cinnamon-desktop-editor, cinnamon-settings-users, melange, background slideshow, the switch editor and screensaver lock dialogs, desktop file generation scripts, as well as all the utilities. Read more

Canonical Releases Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu 17.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

For Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) users, today's security update addresses a bug (CVE-2018-8043) in Linux kernel's Broadcom UniMAC MDIO bus controller driver, which improperly validated device resources, allowing a local attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack). For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users, the security patch fixes a buffer overread vulnerability (CVE-2017-13305) in Linux kernel's keyring subsystem and an information disclosure vulnerability (CVE-2018-5750) in the SMBus driver for ACPI Embedded Controllers. Both issues could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. Read more

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Match.com and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #156
  • A Match.com glitch reactivated a bunch of old profiles, raising concerns about user data

    A Match Group spokesperson confirmed that a “limited number” of old accounts had been accidentally reactivated recently and that any account affected received a password reset. Match.com’s current privacy statement, which was last updated in 2016, says that the company can “retain certain information associated with your account” even after you close it. But that Match Group spokesperson also told The Verge that the company plans to roll out a new privacy policy “in the next month or so,” in order to comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); under the new policy, all those years-old accounts will be deleted. The Verge has requested clarification on which accounts will qualify for deletion, and what “deletion” will specifically entail, but has not received a response as of press time.

  • New hacks siphon private cryptocurrency keys from airgapped wallets

    Like most of the other attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University professor Mordechai Guri and his colleagues, the currency wallet exploits start with the already significant assumption that a device has already been thoroughly compromised by malware. Still, the research is significant because it shows that even when devices are airgapped—meaning they aren't connected to any other devices to prevent the leaking of highly sensitive data—attackers may still successfully exfiltrate the information. Past papers have defeated airgaps using a wide array of techniques, including electromagnetic emissions from USB devices, radio signals from a computer's video card, infrared capabilities in surveillance cameras, and sounds produced by hard drives.

  • New hacker group targets US health-care industry, researchers say

    The group, which Symantec has named “Orangeworm,” has been installing backdoors in large international corporations based in the U.S., Europe and Asia that operate in the health-care sector.

    Among its victims are health-care providers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as IT companies and equipment manufacturers that work for health organizations.