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Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD/Radeon: Driver for Linux 5.5, Radeon Software for Linux 19.30, and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Volleys Another Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 5.5

    While the Linux 5.4 cycle is quickly winding down and with DRM-Next's cut-off crossing, AMD has sent in a last minute batch of changes it's targeting for the upcoming Linux 5.5 merge window.

    AMD in prior weeks submitted a lot of new GPU driver code for Linux 5.5. Friday's pull request is primarily fixes but one notable addition is enabling dynamic power gating for GCN with Raven Ridge APUs.

  • Radeon Software For Linux Updated With Radeon RX 5500 Series Support

    Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 has been the driver release branch since July for the AMD Linux packaged driver stack. That 19.30 driver was introduced with the AMD Radeon RX 5700 "Navi" support while now a slightly updated stack was released.

    Released on Friday was the AMDGPU-PRO 19.30-934563 driver stack as the newest revision to the Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 driver.

  • Benchmarks Of 10 Higher-End Intel/AMD CPUs On Ubuntu 19.10

    With Ubuntu 19.10 bringing some CPU/system performance changes compared to earlier Ubuntu releases as a result of compiler/toolchain upgrades, the newer kernel, and more, here is a quick weekend look at how the Ubuntu 19.10 performance compares across ten different AMD Ryzen and Intel Core systems.

    This is a reference look at the Intel/AMD performance on ten different higher-end desktop/workstation systems with a variety of workloads on Ubuntu 19.10 given the package upgrades found in this recent Linux distribution release.

Games and Graphics: Mainframe Defenders, Proton, NVIDIA 390.132 Linux Driver and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Mainframe Defenders, retrofuturistic squad-based strategy now has a Linux demo

    Mainframe Defenders from Old Byte Apps is an in-development retro take on a squad-based strategy roguelike. They just announced today that they've now added a Linux demo.

    The story is your typical cyberspace affair, with a virus infiltrating infecting an AI controlled research complex. Your overall mission is to crush this virus and defend the mainframe through a series of missions with different objectives and enemies.

  • Steam Play Proton 4.11-8 is out with vkd3d for Direct3D 12 support

    Another update to Steam Play Proton has been released this evening, which should bring with it plenty of improvements for playing Windows games on Linux.

    Looking to get started with Steam Play on Linux? Be sure to check our previous beginners guide.

    Proton 4.11-8 now includes vkd3d, another library built on top of Vulkan to add in Direct3D 12 support. Other parts of Proton also saw version bumps like DXVK to 1.4.4, D9VK to 0.30, FAudio to 19.11 and Wine-mono to 4.9.4.

  • NVIDIA 390.132 Linux Driver Released For Legacy Fermi Support

    Not nearly as exciting as the recent NVIDIA 440 Linux driver series going stable but for those with older Fermi graphics cards and wanting to use the latest NVIDIA binary driver experience, their 390 series legacy driver series has been updated.

    The NVIDIA 390.132 driver is out today as the latest legacy driver update targeting the GeForce GTX 400/500 "Fermi" graphics cards.

  • Your weekend look at what's on sale and what you can try free

    While the Halloween sales are over, plenty of stores still have some big and interesting game sales going on with lots of Linux games going cheap.

mesa 19.3.0-rc2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Hi list,

Along with the stable mesa 19.2.3 release today, I'm pleased to announce mesa
19.3.0-rc2. There's a large number of bug fixes in this release, nouveau, intel,
radeon, radv, turnip, nir, meson, zink, iris, swr, core mesa, and android fixes
are all present here.

Developers, please have a look at the release tracker:
https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/milestones/5, there's plenty of bugs
that need looking at if you have some time.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Alyssa Rosenzweig (1):
      pipe-loader: Build kmsro loader for with all kmsro targets

Bas Nieuwenhuizen (6):
      radv: Fix timeout handling in syncobj wait.
      radv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      turnip: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      anv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
      radv: Fix disk_cache_get size argument.
      radv: Close all unnecessary fds in secure compile.

Daniel Schürmann (4):
      docs/relnotes/new_features.txt: Add note about ACO
      aco: fix immediate offset for spills if scratch is used
      aco: only use single-dword loads/stores for spilling
      aco: fix accidential reordering of instructions when scheduling

Dylan Baker (3):
      nir: correct use of identity check in python
      meson: Add dep_glvnd to egl deps when building with glvnd
      Bump VERSION to 19.3.0-rc2

Erik Faye-Lund (1):
      zink: emit line-width when using polygon line-mode

Ian Romanick (1):
      intel/compiler: Report the number of non-spill/fill SEND messages on vec4 too

Ilia Mirkin (2):
      gm107/ir: fix loading z offset for layered 3d image bindings
      nv50/ir: mark STORE destination inputs as used

Jan Zielinski (1):
      gallium/swr: Fix depth values for blit scenario

Jason Ekstrand (3):
      anv: Fix a potential BO handle leak
      anv/tests: Zero-initialize instances
      anv: Set the batch allocator for compute pipelines

Jordan Justen (2):
      iris: Add IRIS_DIRTY_RENDER_BUFFER state flag
      iris/gen11+: Move flush for render target change

Kenneth Graunke (1):
      iris: Fix "Force Zero RTA Index Enable" setting again

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      intel/dev: set default num_eu_per_subslice on gen12
      mesa: check draw buffer completeness on glClearBufferfi/glClearBufferiv
      anv: Properly handle host query reset of performance queries

Mauro Rossi (1):
      android: aco: fix Lower to CSSA

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: remove the operand restriction for src1 on GLK

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (2):
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      mesa: enable msaa in clear_with_quad if needed

Samuel Pitoiset (1):
      radv: fix compute pipeline keys when optimizations are disabled


git tag: mesa-19.3.0-rc2

Read more

Also: Mesa 19.3-RC2 Released With Fixes To RADV Vulkan, Intel Driver Fixes

Graphics: Mesa 19.2.3 and NVIDIA Xavier NX

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.2.3
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce the immediate availability of mesa 19.2.3. Things are
    mostly slowing down now, the one exception is the giant pile of release-script
    changes from me. Yay simplifying the release.
    
    We've got a bit of everything in this release, iris, meson, radv, anv, turnip ,
    965, svga, utils, core mesa, glsl, etanviv, and gallium/rbug. But not too much
    any one place, all in all it feels like we're settling nicely into the stable
    release groove.
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (4):
          radv: Fix timeout handling in syncobj wait.
          radv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
          turnip: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
          anv: Remove _mesa_locale_init/fini calls.
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
          anv: Fix output of INTEL_DEBUG=bat for chained batches
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          glsl: Initialize all fields of ir_variable in constructor
    
    Dylan Baker (13):
          bin/gen_release_notes.py: fix conditional of bugfix
          bin/gen_release_notes.py: strip '#' from gitlab bugs
          bin/gen_release_notes.py: Return "None" if there are no new features
          bin/post_version.py: Pass version as an argument
          bin/post_version.py: white space fixes
          bin/post_release.py: Add .html to hrefs
          bin/gen_release_notes.py: html escape all external data
          bin/gen_release_notes.py: Add a warning if new features are introduced in a point release
          cherry-ignore: update for 19.2.3 cycle
          nir: correct use of identity check in python
          meson: Add dep_glvnd to egl deps when building with glvnd
          docs: add release notes for 19.2.3
          Bump version to 19.2.3
    
    Ilia Mirkin (1):
          nv50/ir: mark STORE destination inputs as used
    
    Illia Iorin (1):
          Revert "mesa/main: Fix multisample texture initialize"
    
    Jason Ekstrand (2):
          anv: Fix a potential BO handle leak
          anv/tests: Zero-initialize instances
    
    Jon Turney (2):
          rbug: Fix use of alloca() without #include "c99_alloca.h"
          Fix timespec_from_nsec test for 32-bit time_t
    
    Jonathan Marek (1):
          etnaviv: fix depth bias
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          iris: Fix "Force Zero RTA Index Enable" setting again
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (2):
          anv: fix unwind of vkCreateDevice fail
          mesa: check draw buffer completeness on glClearBufferfi/glClearBufferiv
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          util/u_queue: skip util_queue_finish if num_threads is 0
    
    Nanley Chery (5):
          anv: Properly allocate aux-tracking space for CCS_E
          intel/blorp: Disable depth testing for slow depth clears
          iris: Clear ::has_hiz when disabling aux
          iris: Don't leak the resource for unsupported modifier
          iris: Disallow incomplete resource creation
    
    Paulo Zanoni (1):
          intel/compiler: remove the operand restriction for src1 on GLK
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          mesa: enable msaa in clear_with_quad if needed
    
    Sagar Ghuge (1):
          intel/blorp: Assign correct view while clearing depth stencil
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (4):
          radv: do not create meta pipelines with 16 samples
          radv: do not emit rbplus if attachments are undefined
          radv/gfx10: fix 3D images
          radv: fix vkUpdateDescriptorSets with inline uniform blocks
    
    Tapani Pälli (1):
          i965: setup sized internalformat for MESA_FORMAT_R10G10B10A2_UNORM
    
    Thomas Hellstrom (2):
          svga: Fix banded DMA upload unmap
          winsys/svga: Limit the maximum DMA hardware buffer size
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.2.3
    
  • Mesa 19.2.3 Released With Many Fixes While Waiting For Mesa 19.3 In A Few Weeks

    Mesa 19.2.3 has a number of RADV Vulkan driver fixes (including a fix for 3D images with GFX10/Navi), various fixes to the Intel ANV Vulkan driver, a few alterations to the maturing Intel Iris Gallium3D driver, and other random fixes throughout the 3D stack.

  • NVIDIA Launches Jetson Xavier NX As 70x45mm 10~15 Watt "AI Supercomputer"

    NVIDIA announced today the newest member of the Jetson family: the Xavier NX as "the world's smallest supercomputer" coming in at smaller than the size of a credit/debit card. This mini supercomputer can deliver 21 TOPS for modern AI workloads while consuming less than 10 Watts or optionally a higher-performance 15 Watt mode.

    The Jetson Xavier NX is powered by a low-power version of the Tegra Xavier SoC. The Jetson Xavier NX offers six NVIDIA Carmel ARMv8.2 cores, a 384-core Volta GPU with 48 Tensor cores, dual NVDLA engines, 8GB of LPDDR4x memory, 16GB eMMC, Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.1, and other functionality all off a 70x45 mm PCB and running off a +5V line.

Graphics: Vulkan, FreeBSD and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Additional Intel "ANV" Vulkan Driver Performance Numbers For Gen11 Ice Lake Graphics

    Complementing the earlier Intel Ice Lake "Gen11" graphics comparison and the Windows vs. Linux Ice Lake graphics driver numbers, here are some additional Vulkan data points in different Linux and Steam Play games.

  • GPU Passthrough For FreeBSD's Bhyve Can Work But Is Fairly Rudimentary

    FreeBSD's Bhyve hypervisor has had a wild ride over the past half-decade of development for advancing BSD virtualization support. Bhyve is mostly used on the server front but can also fill some desktop use-cases now that there is GPU pass-through support working albeit not yet polished.

  • RADV Lands VK_EXT_subgroup_size_control For Exposing Wave32 On Navi/GFX10

    Valve open-source developer Samuel Pitoiset has landed his work enabling the Vulkan VK_EXT_subgroup_size_control extension that for GFX10/Navi is being used to expose Wave32 capabilities.

    Samuel's work has landed for this Vulkan extension that allows for a varying subgroup size and allows for compute shaders to use Wave32 as supported with GFX10 hardware. Another caveat though is the current implementation only works with the AMDGPU LLVM back-end and not yet the ACO shader back-end.

Xwayland randr resolution change emulation now available in Fedora 31

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

As mentioned in an earlier blogpost, I have been working on fixing many games showing a small image centered on a black background when they are run fullscreen under Wayland. In that blogpost I was moslty looking at how to solve this for native Wayland games. But for various reasons almost all games still use X11, so instead I've ended up focussing on fixing this for games using Xwayland.

Xwayland now has support for emulating resolution changes requested by an app through the randr or vidmode extensions. If a client makes a resolution change requests this is remembered and if the client then creates a window located at the monitor's origin and sized to exactly that resolution, then Xwayland will ask the compositor to scale it to fill the entire monitor.

For apps which use _NET_WM_FULLLSCREEN (e.g. SDL2, SFML or OGRE based apps) to go fullscreen some help from the compositor is necessary. This is currently implemented in mutter. If you are a developer of another compositor and have questions about this, please drop me an email.

Read more

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Last week NVIDIA announced the GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER as their newest Turing "SUPER" graphics card coming in at $229+ USD and delivering around 1.5x faster performance than the GeForce GTX 1060. For those wondering about the Linux gaming performance potential for this graphics card, here are our initial tests of this new graphics card using the EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER.

On launch day I purchased the EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER for carrying out these Linux benchmarks. The EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER (06G-P4-1068-KR) was in-stock on launch day and indeed hitting the $229 USD retail price. This graphics card features a dual fan setup and metal backplate. While the GTX 1660 SUPER reference specifications put the boost clock at 1785MHz, the EVGA model does advertise a possible 1830MHz boost clock frequency. The rest of the specs including 14Gbps 6GB GDDR6 video memory are in-line with the GTX 1660 SUPER specifications.

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Nvidia Releases New Linux Graphics Driver with GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Nvidia 440.31 is now available as the latest long-lived branch of the proprietary graphics driver for Linux, BSD, and Solaris platforms, adding support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER graphics card, parallel GLSL shader linking by default, support for HDMI 2.1 variable refresh rate (VRR), as well as support for the GL_NV_gpu_multicast and GLX_NV_multigpu_context extensions.

It also brings VP9 decode support to the Nvidia VDPAU driver, a new "SidebandSocketPath" X configuration option to control the folder where the X driver creates a pathname UNIX domain socket that's being used to communicate with the Nvidia OpenGL, Vulkan, and VDPAU driver components, and EGL support for PRIME render offload, and optimizes the GPU clock management strategy.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA 440.31 Linux Driver Adds HDMI 2.1 VRR Support, VP9 Decode, DXVK Fixes

Digilent Offers 2 Zynq-Based Linux Development Boards Supporting SYZYGY Expansion

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Digilent has announced two new SBCs that are ultra-high-speed and built to be more modular than its other boards. The company, which has a great deal of experience in Pmod lower speed FPGA standards has now entered the open-source, SYZYGY high-speed standards with its Eclypse Z7 and the Genesys ZU development SBCs.

We reported on the Zybo development board FPGA SoC from Digilent and that seems to have lead to the latest format for the Eclypse Z7.

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AMD Navi 22 and Navi 23 Show Up In Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

References to Navi 22 and Navi 23 silicon have been spotted inside a Linux driver by a 3DCenter forum veteran known as Berniyh (you can find them here and here). Could these be the high-end Navi parts Lisa Su was referring to in August?

Nvidia has been sitting peacefully alone in the premium graphics card market. Although AMD has already launched its Navi-based graphics cards (AMD Radeon RX 5700 and 5700 XT) the chipmaker still doesn't have an answer for Nvidia's high-end offerings, such as the GeForce RTX 2080 Super or RTX 2080 Ti. Berniyh's discovery doesn't mean big Navi is landing tomorrow, but it is coming.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox Extension Spotlight and Rust in Purism and Rav1e

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Image Search Options

    Let’s say you stumble upon an interesting image on the web and you want to learn more about it, like… where did it come from? Who are the people in it? Is there a backstory? Are there others like it? There are a number of dedicated image search engines that can help you learn more, but if you do a lot of reverse image searching (dubbed “reverse” because instead of using text to search images, you start this search process with an image), it quickly becomes cumbersome to always copy the image, navigate to your preferred image search site, paste in the pic, sift through results, etc. Naturally, there are browser extensions designed to streamline this distinct form of search. One of the most capable is Image Search Options. It makes reverse image searching simple and fast. Once installed on Firefox, just right-click on any image you find to pull up a context menu offering 11 image search engines. That search engine variety should be enough to satisfy most folks, but if not, Image Search Options allows you to customize the list of search providers by adding your own or removing others. You can even set it to automatically search across multiple engines simultaneously.

  • Oxidizing Squeekboard

    The experiment relies entirely on Squeekboard as the subject. It has been chosen due to the need to redesign it for a new process (X.org to Wayland), and due to being relatively easy to separate. Because Rust is an element belonging to the programming language group, this analysis ignores all other constituents of Squeekboard. Squeekboard’s programming languages are almost exclusively Rust and C, with some shell and Meson impurities, which are subsequently ignored, as replacing them with Rust is not expected to yield useful results. [...] Oxidation is a process of adding oxygen to a chemical compound. Some examples are burning, and rusting. This experiment concerns the Rusting of a compound called Squeekboard: a derivative of Eekboard, originally containing high quantities of C, and reacting eagerly with GObject, GTK, and the X windowing system. The goal of the ongoing experiment is to measure properties of Rust and the consequences of its application in real-world conditions. Due to safety and time concerns, the widely popular approach of Rewrite it in Rust (RiiR) was dismissed in favor of a gradual oxidation process.

  • Rav1e Squeezes Out More Performance For This Rust-Written AV1 Encoder

    Intel's SVT-AV1 video encoder for AV1 is currently the fastest AV1 CPU-based encoder we have seen but it's looking like in due time Rav1e could be closing in on it if they continue with their current trajectory. Recently we've seen this Rust-written AV1 encoder making impressive gains in performance. There has been x86 hand-tuned Assembly and more instruction set extensions now being exploited by rav1e and other performance improvements. It's been enough that earlier this month marked the first release of rav1e.

Pinebook Pro Review: A $200 laptop that’s only for cool people.

There’s a $200 laptop out in the wild now that has been getting a lot of buzz in the Fediverse. It’s called the Pinebook Pro and it ships with a customized version of Debian Stretch with the Mate desktop. If you don’t know what that means, it’s Linux. This is a Linux laptop. But that’s not all… it also has a few other tricks up its sleeve, like a bootable MicroSD card slot so you can easily run other operating systems off a cheap memory card whenever you feel like it. Now, this is being sold at cost mainly as a gift to the Free (as in Freedom) Open Source Software (FOSS) community so it’s not really meant for normal people. If you just want to open web pages like Facebook or Google Docs, you’re probably better off with a Chromebook or Macbook. If you believe in freedom and like to seriously learn about technology, keep reading… The Pinebook Pro is serious fun! Read more

Kernel: LWN's Latest Free Articles and Linux Support for "Data Streaming Accelerator" (DSA)

  • The 2019 Automated Testing Summit

    As with the first ATS, this edition was organized by Tim Bird and Kevin Hilman. Bird welcomed everyone to the conference then turned things over to Hilman for something of an overview of the "kernel testing landscape". Hilman started by noting that there were some gatherings and discussions at the Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) in September, which he described in an email to the automated-testing mailing list. There were some themes that came out of those discussions, he said, which led to the title of his talk (slides [PDF]): "The bugs are too fast (and why we can't catch them)". He gave a brief summary of the new kernel unit-testing frameworks that were discussed at LPC in order to bring attendees up to date on what kernel developers have been up to. The existing kernel test efforts, including kselftest, Linux Test Project (LTP), syzbot, and others, are likely pretty familiar to attendees, he said. The KUnit framework (LWN article from March) has been merged into linux-next; it is a fast way to test kernel functionality in an architecture-independent way and can be run in user space with user-mode Linux (UML). The Kernel Test Framework (KTF) is another unit-test framework that has been posted for comments. Since KUnit is headed for the mainline, though, the KTF project will need to figure out how to add its functionality to KUnit, Hilman said, since there won't be multiple unit-test frameworks in the mainline. He then turned to the various testing initiatives that are currently active. The Intel 0-Day test service is probably the longest running; it is "mostly Intel focused". The Linaro Linux kernel functional testing (LKFT) has "quite a bit of in-depth testing but on a narrower set of hardware". The Red Hat continuous kernel integration (CKI) project has been around for a while, but has only recently been seen more publicly, he said; it is focused on testing stable kernels. And, of course, there is KernelCI that he cofounded; it was officially announced as a Linux Foundation project earlier in the week.

  • Emulated iopl()

    Operating systems and computing hardware both carry a lot of their history with them. The x86 I/O-port mechanism is one piece of that history; it is rarely used by hardware designed in the last 20 years, but it must still be supported. That doesn't mean that this support can't be cleaned up and improved, though, especially when the old implementation turns out to have some unpleasant properties. An example can be seen in the iopl() patch set from Thomas Gleixner. On most architectures, I/O is handled through memory-mapped I/O (MMIO) regions. A peripheral device will make a set of registers available as a range of memory; that range is then mapped into the processor's address space. Device drivers can then interact with the device by reading from and writing to those registers using normal memory accesses (or something close to that). This mechanism is flexible and it allows, for example, a set of registers to be mapped into a user-space process if the need arises; user-space drivers generally depend on this capability. Back in the early days of the x86 architecture, though, things were done a little differently. A separate address space was created for up to 65536 I/O ports, which have to be accessed via special instructions. Even devices that could map memory ranges for other purposes would use I/O ports for their control interfaces. The instructions for accessing I/O ports are necessarily privileged, so user-space code cannot normally use them.

  • Statistics from the 5.4 development cycle

    As of this writing, just over 14,000 non-merge changesets have found their way into the mainline repository for the 5.4 release; that is a bit less than we saw for 5.3, but more than most of the other recent kernels. The final 5.4 release is approaching, so it must be time for our usual look at where the code merged in this development cycle came from. It's mostly business as usual in the kernel community, modulo an appearance from none other than Hulk Robot. Those 14,000 changesets were contributed by 1,802 developers, which is just short of the 1,846 who contributed to 5.3; there is still time, though, for 5.4 to set a new record for the number of contributors — a surprising number of developers wait until the end of the release cycle to fix something. Of the developers seen so far, 266 made their first contribution to the kernel in this cycle. The combined work from these developers increased the size of the kernel by 393,000 lines.

  • Analyzing kernel email

    Digging into the email that provides the cornerstone of Linux kernel development is an endeavor that has become more popular over the last few years. There are some practical reasons for analyzing the kernel mailing lists and for correlating that information with the patches that actually reach the mainline, including tracking the path that patches take—or don't take. Three researchers reported on some efforts they have made on kernel email analysis at the 2019 Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE), held in late October in Lyon, France. The presentation (slides [PDF]) actually listed four speakers, though one could not make it to ELCE. The three present were Ralf Ramsauer, from the Technical University of Applied Sciences Regensburg, Sebastian Duda, of Friedrich–Alexander University Erlangen–Nürnberg, and Wolfgang Mauerer, of Siemens AG in Munich. Lukas Bulwahn, who is a hobbyist active in the Linux Foundation ELISA Project and employed at BMW AG, was unable to attend. In the introduction, Mauerer jokingly suggested that the goal of the research was to understand more "than the NSA already knows" about the behavior of kernel developers. Really, though, the presentation was meant partly as a request for comments; the researchers have been observing the kernel community for some time and have been pulling out pieces they find interesting, but they would be happy to hear other ideas on the kinds of analysis that would be useful to the community.

  • Intel Details New Data Streaming Accelerator For Future CPUs - Linux Support Started

    The "Data Streaming Accelerator" (DSA) is a new block on future Intel CPUs that hasn't been talked about much publicly... Until now. Intel's open-source crew has begun detailing DSA for future Intel CPUs that will offer high-performance data movement and transformation operations. The Linux driver enablement has begun.

Red Hat: Application Migration, Departure, OpenShift Commons Gathering and More

  • Application Migration with Container-native virtualization

    More and more frequently, modern applications are choosing a container-first development and deployment paradigm built on the foundation of Kubernetes. However, not all applications are fully modernized and containerized micro services. Many applications are a hybrid of architectures and technology which have existed for years, even decades. This can add complexity, both to the application architecture and management overhead, when a container-based, cloud-native application component needs to access existing functionality which is virtual machine based. Container-native virtualization provides flexibility during the modernization process so that you can focus on the most critical aspects first, while still being able to access, manage, and consume VM-based aspects using the new Kubernetes-centric tools. Based on the KubeVirt project, recently accepted by the CNCF, Container-native virtualization manages both virtual machines and containers through a single control plane saving time, resources, and budget. Red Hat Container-native virtualization delivers KubeVirt functionality directly to OpenShift customers and helps to manage both virtual machines and OpenShift deployments from a single platform. This single platform simplifies the management of virtual machines and containers with a common Kubernetes interface that standardizes orchestration, networking, and storage management while also supporting the long term move to containers.

  • Alberto Ruiz: Hanging the Red Hat

    After 6+ wonderful years at Red Hat, I’ve decided to hang the fedora to go and try new things. For a while I’ve been craving for a new challenge and I’ve felt the urge to try other things outside of the scope of Red Hat so with great hesitation I’ve finally made the jump. I am extremely proud of the work done by the teams I have had the honour to run as engineering manager, I met wonderful people, I’ve worked with extremely talented engineers and learned lots. I am particularly proud of the achievements of my latest team from increasing the bootloader team and improving our relationship with GRUB upstream, to our wins at teaching Lenovo how to do upstream hardware support to improvements in Thunderbolt, Miracast, Fedora/RHEL VirtualBox guest compatibility… the list goes on and credit goes mostly to my amazing team. Thanks to this job I have been able to reach out to other upstreams beyond GNOME, like Fedora, LibreOffice, the Linux Kernel, Rust, GRUB… it has been an amazing ride and I’ve met wonderful people in each one of them.

  • Recap: OpenShift Commons Gathering at Kubecon/NA San Diego [Videos Uploaded]

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering in San Diego brought together over 550+ Kubernetes and Cloud Native experts from all over the world to discuss container technologies, best practices for cloud native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem.

  • IBM Kicks Up Kubernetes Compatibility With Open Source